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rHE PURPLE AND WHITE. 



Volume I. 



QUAE FIANT, EX HOC COGNOSCES. 



Jackson, Aississippi, January 8th, 1909. 



/? £ »/ 
Pi v A*?/ 



Number 



ATHLETICS. ference next year, we will liave In the first game with Texas, 

created such a strong sentiment which resulted in a 0-0 tie, Mis- 
J ,}, is not our purpose to try to that the opposition will be too sissippi advanced the ball to Tex- 
conduct the athletic department weak to fight us. Then will peo- as’ three-yard line twice, but lost 
so as to please everybody, and pie know that Millsaps College both times by fumbles. In this 
make them see the athletic situa- is still on the globe and coming game the defensive work of the 
tion here with an optimistic eye. to the front. team was almost perfect — Welch, 

We intend to say what vre think Neill and Waters doing some ex- 

and put it in the plainest words VICTORIOUS AT RUSTON. cellen't tackling, 
possible. It shall be our [.impose The second game with Texas 

to make a fight on the ol 1 gymna- The delegates to the Southwest- 1 was won principally by the use 
sium and a plea for a ae v ere. era Students’ Conference at Rus- of the forward pass. It was ex- 
We shall not hesitate to express ton. La„ delighted tin} student ecuted successfully time and 
our opinions concerning inter-col- body Tuesday morning by march- again by Peeples and Campbell, 
legiate athletics, and shall try and ing into the chapel with the chain- White at full back and Bailey at 
voice the sentiment of the stu- pionship football pennant flying half also made some very sub- 
dent body on that subject. Nor proudly at their head. This is stantial gains through the Texas 
shall we hesitate to show up what not the first time that Millsaps lines, 
we think to be the weak points j men have brought back champion- 
of our dearly beloved Athletic ! ship trophies, but it is the first 

Association. time they have ever won out in WANTED TO KNOW : 

Recently our inter-collegiate as- football. Millsaps men who star- 
pirations have been killed with- red on the winning team were : Where Dr. Walmsley got his 

out a word of warning, so we Bailey, manager and right half; new ring. 

must start all over again and Peeples, captain and left half: why Neill and Wesson would 

make the best we can of inter- Campbell, quarter back; Neill, uo t wear their football togs at 

collegiate games. But do not center; Wasson, left tackle; Ruff, football practice in Ruston. 

think that we would have you be- left guard, Mullins, right tackle ; Misg Anstin didn’t'go 

lieve that inter-class athletics can Welch, right guard and Williams “kodaking” Xmas 

be substituted for, or even com- right end. The bovs are very , 

j .. , . , , ,, , . The price of a party ticket to 

pared with, inter-collegiate ath- much elated over the showing 

letics, rather, you must know that made by our men against such | ‘ 

they go hand in hand, each de- men as Pritchard, all-Southern the Juniors keep a watch 

pending on the other. Our most tackle for Vanderbilt, Long of " n P r °f essor Moor®. 

ardent supporters of class games Oklahoma, and one of the best How Tom Stennis is capable of 

have failed to see this, and refuse football players in the West, and ! loving so many girls. 

to believe that instead of killing Darter, a two-hundred pounder ( What has become of Dr. Sulli-j 

inter-collegiate games only add from the University of Texas. The van’s B. Y. P. U. Chemistry 

stimulus to class games. following scores tell the story of 1 e ] ass ' 



WANTED TO KNOW: 



be substituted for, or even com- right end. The boys are very 
pared with, inter-collegiate ath- much elated over the showing 
letics, rather, you must know that made by our men against such 
they go hand in hand, each de- men as Pritchard. all-Southern j 



How Tom Stennis is capable of 



stimulus to class games. — ^ following scores tell the sto 

So now, fellows, don’t permit the championship series: 

your eyes to be closed, but keep Mississippi, 5 — Louisian, 0. 

your vision clear and wake up to Mississippi , 0 — ' Texas 0. 

the true condition of athletics , r . . . . __ 

, , Mississippi, 10 — Texas, 6. 

here at Millsaps. The only wav 

we can ever win out is to compel Tpxas ^-Oklahoma 0. 
our fight to be made in conference In the Louisiana game, Pe 



Program of the Lamar Literary 
Society. 



we can ever win out is to compel lpxas 0 UKlahoma U. Declaimer— Joe Carson. 

our fight to be made in conference In the Louisiana game, Peeples Question for Debate — Reolved, 

and not an underhand, political and Bailey did most of the That college graduates have done 

move that would do credit to the ground-gaining for Mississippi — more for humanity than mer. with- 

Reconstruetion period. So let us the game being run by a sensa- out college education. 

begin the fight now and let those tional seventy-yard run by Pee- Affirmative — John Gass, Oscar 

of you whose fathers are preach- pies for a touchdown. Only once Rainey. A. A. Green. 

ers, begin on them at once, and let was the Mississippi goal in dan- Negative — Ford Buffkin, • Jake 

everybody who has the interest ger. Louisiana advanced the ball Bingham, Green, J. W. 

of Millsaps College at heart do to Mississippi’s fifteen yard line 

something toward securing inter- by a series of runs, but Prichard Both societies meet promtply in 
collegiate athletics. Then when failed to gain and Louisiana lost their halls at 8 o ’clock p . m . All 
the matter is brought up in Con- [the ball on downs. |, students are cordially invited. 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



The Purple and White THE kuston conference Nor is there any lack of in - 

eentive for men , 0 do som ething. 

Published Weekly by the Junior The Ruston Conference which The eye of the who ,le world toda >’ 
Class of Millsaps College. has just closed, means much to is. “My Kingdom fa,’" a mau "'ho 
_ ... ! . , the students of the Southwestern can and will da somet.-* 1 * 11 '^ du 

A A*witic Ed’ tor* ”^ a tes. Here you come into con- every calling and proiess. :on i- aere 
d.r 8 w^8^o A n ET 8AUM Y. M^A 1 imol: taet with strong leaders, men who is a need of a man who caJ\ DUsh 
m°l N ne A ll .' .' .' .' ■ Business Milage?' liave eau £ht th|1 higher vision and a need that is felt on all sides ol 

A. F. KELLY . . A ssistant Business Mgr. who stand f ()r th(? hJghest aud 



ROBT. H. RUFF 
L. BARRETT JONES 
A. B. CAMPBELL 



Matters for publication should be address- 
ed to the Editor-in-Chief. All business com- 
mnnicatios should be sent to M. L. Neill. 



Seventy-Five Cents. 

OUR DEBUT. 



no- 



the world. There ere question^ 
blest in college life. This means that are perpelling not only our 

a great deal for the Southern Col- own country but the whole world, 

Single c °£* e ™** F ? v e e n J w ° Copies leges as they are at a period in and that cause the nations to 

their development where this stand with outstretched arms and 

strong, virile force will have much cry, “Oh! For real men.” 
to do in shaping their career. And to whom have the nations 

Today we present the first copy Forty years ag0 Harvard was a turned, and to whom must they 
of The Purple and White, our eolle " e of sonie Hundred stu- turn? The answers to all think- 
eollege weekly. For some time 
we have felt the need of a live 
weekly newspaper gotten out in 



dents, now it has more than five ing men comes quick and sure, 

‘To the college man.” Today is 



thousand. It did not have this 

force when it was m its plastic preeminently the day of the eol- 
interest of the college. The Junior s * ate as we h ave - and the leaders lege man. He is in uemand and 
Class seeing this need, began a 



movement which has resulted in 
this weekly. It will in no sense 
be a Junior paper, its editor being 
from the Junior Class. We want 
everyone in college to feel that 



tions of importance that shall a- 
rise in the future and expects the 



I tell ns that now it is hard to ere- not by only a few corporations, 
ate among them the higher ideal but by the whole civilized world, 
which the Association stands for. To the college mau tne world 
the development of man in his leave the solutions of the ques- 
three-fold nature. 

We are now in our formative 
they have an interest in it and P er ^ od ; s0 1° speak, auf* the forces solutions of their hands. But the 
desire to make it a real force. which shape our ideals will have question that we would ask every 
... mueh t0 do with our future. Our ;Mill saps man is. what do you in- 

As unity is a requisite m the college is destined to grow large, tend to contribute to the solving? 
business world, so it is in our eol- therefore it behooves us to stand Or, do you intend to hinder the 
lege life, and we know of no bet- f or this high ideal that Millsaps solving either by oppositions or by 
ter way to unify the various col- may be known as one who deveol- 

ops in the highest sense. de 



lege interest than by a weekly 
newspaper. It will solidify the 0 p S j n the highest sense, the man 



indifference ? 

Every man may truly say of him- 
self for good or bad, 



different phases of college activi- physically, the man mentally, and p ve reared mon ument, my own 

4-1, UhKH- XT xr .. 7 * . 



ties, such as the Athletic, Y. M. 
C. A., Sosial, and other vital 
parts of college life. 



the man morallv. 



PUSHING FORWARD. 



More durable than b 

Yea, kingly pyramids of stone, 

In height it doth surpass. 



We want to make The Purple 
and White breezy and snappy, but 
cannot do it unless we have the 
hearty support and co-operation 
of the faculty and student body. 
It will in no sense supplant our 
monthly magazine which is devot- 
ed to literature, while the weekly 
will be given up to tne different 
interests of the college. 

Our college has grown from 
a 3mall institution to one of the 
foremost in the South, and to 
hold our place, we must be able to 
keep abreast with the times. We 
must have a broacy;r conception 
of college life and to make our- 
selves and college count for the 
most. Hence we make our debut 
into college journalism. 



It is not our intention to re- blast 

mind our fellow students that New Disturb its settled base, 

Year resolutions are in order, but Nor countless ages rolling past 
it is our intention to say some- Its symmetry deface, 
thing however, insignificant it 

may be upon what we choose to I shall not wholly die. Some part, 
term “Pushing Forward.” Nor that a little shall 

It is the privilege of man in Escape the dark destroyer ’3 dart, 
every walk and condition of life And his grim festival 
to push himself forawrd and to Then we would urge every man 
use every honest and legitimate to let his movement be one for 
means to accomplish the desired doing “Something.” 
end. It is more. It is his duty. Again we would say, “Push 
For we are taught that God ereat- Forward.” Do not be in the class 
ed man for a purpose. Then sure- designated by the “wielder of the 
ly no disparagement is to be plac- big stick” as “molly coddles,” 
ed upon the man who strives to but rather, be an honest “wield- 
advance himself, if at the same er of the big stick.” It is a debt 
time he leaves an honest and ben- that every man owes to himself, 
eficial legacy to the world. to his country and to his Maker. 




THE PURPLE ANE WHITE 



RUSTON CONFERENCE. 

'During the Christmas holidays 
the following of our number had 
the great privilege of attending 
the Southwestern Students’ Con- 
ference: A. C. Anderson, T. L. 
Bailey, Ford Buffkin, A. B. 
Compbell, R. J. Mullins, M. L. 
Neill, A. R. Peeples, R. H. Ruff. 
D. R. Wasson, W. A. Welch and 
F. S. Williams. They report a 
very profitable and enjoyable 
time. 

They all came back filled with 
a greater determinination to do 
more for their Savior. Two of 
them have already joined the vol- 
unteer band. Great strides are 
being made in every department 
of the Association, especially in 
Bible and Mission studies. A new 
plan of Bible study has been put 
on foot, which, I think, will be 
much more effective than the old 
one was. We hope mese men will 
continue to work, and may the ef- 
fect of the conference De seen in 
the work they do and the lives 
they lead. May they not cease to 
work until every boy in school 
shall be brought under the influ- 
ence of the Association. 

The conference was held at Rus- 
ton. La., and was conducted by 
Mr. W. D. Weatherford. lie 
was assisted by two other filter- 
national secretaries, Mr. Willis 
and Mr. McMillan. He had also 
with him as platform speakers and 
leaders, Mr. Coulter, Dr. Web- 
ber, President of Centenary, Rev. 
Paul Kern. Dr. Stevenson, Mr. 
White and Mr. Martin, a return- 
ed missionary from Africa, who- 
told in a very touching way of 
the great needs of the African 
people. Each of these men had 
charge of separate departments 
of the conference. They presented 
their subjects in such a forcible 
way that one could not help but 
catch a greater vision of Jesus 
Christ and of service and be con- 
strained to make new determina- 
i ons. 

The program for each day was 
about as follows: Breakfast at 

seven, Bible study study at eight, 
college conference at nine, insti- 
tute at ten, a life work address 



at eleven and dinner at twelve. 
The entire afternoon was given to 
athletics. The men from -one 
State would meet the men from 
another State on the gridiron and 
there wrestle for the champion- 
ship. Dinner time and the after- 
noons were the times when col- 
lege spirit was at its highest. It 
was the most enjoyable time of 
the day, and one which afforded 
an invaluable opportunity for 
making friends and acquaintances 
from every part of the South- 
west. Supper was served at six 
o’clock and another life work 
address was given at seven. Mis- 
sion study came from eight to 
nine, then from nine to ten the 
del egates from each State would 
meet and discuss the different 
phases of the Association work in 
their State. 



SOCIAL. 

Prof. Moore was the host of the 
Junior Class at an oyster supper 
on the evening of December 22nd. 
Promptly at 8 o’clock, according 
to request, the boys assembled 
at the Hotel Royal. Here they j 
were met by their friend and 
teacher and ushered into the din- 
ing room where the sumptuous re- 
past awaited them. 

After the various courses had 
been served the guests were call- 
ed upon for toasts. Almost every- 
one present responded, and at 
length when junior eloquence was 
quite exhausted Dr. Kern treated 
the crowd to cigars. 

The boys spent a very pleasant 
evening, and all feel deeply in- 
debted to Professor Moore for his 
generous hospitality. 



Another delightful occasion was 
the reception given by the Kappa 
Alpha fraternity a week later. 
The chapter house is an ideal j 
home in which to receive and en- 1 
tertain the fair friends of Alpha 
Mu. On this occasion the large 1 
rooms down stairs were elaborate* 
ly decorated in crimson and gold, 
the fraternity colors, and the 
bright fires which burned in the 
grates added cheerfulness and I 
charm to the scene. 



La'te in the evening the doors of 
the library were thrown qpen, and 
the guests beheld a dazzling 
Christmas tree. Mrs. John Gass 
made an excellent Santa Claus 
and all were deiglited with the 
toysthey received. 

The hours passed off merrily 
and altogether too quickly for the 
happy party. The guests all tes- 
tify that they had a “lovely” time 
and that the Kappa Alpha boys 
are royal hosts. 



On the evening of December 
12th the Kappa Sigmas gave a 
most delightful reception to their 
host of friends. At an early hour 
the spacious halls were filled with 
a bevy of bright, happy girls and 
as many gallant young brothers 
and friends of the chapter. The 
fraternity colors , scarlet, emerald 
and pearl white, were everywhere 
in evidence and tlie witching 
strains of music furnished by the 
orchestra completed the bright- 
ness of the occasion. 

During the evening a tempting 
salad course was served, followed 
by dainty ices and cakes and as 
usual, the punch bowl was a nev- 
er failing source of pleasure. 

But the hours soon sped away, 
and the happy company was com- 
pelled to disband. It was with 
great reluctance that the guests 
bade their hosts “good-night.” 
All agree that the event was suc- 
i cess in every sense of the word, 
and we hope that the Kappa Sig- 
mas may never lose that hospital- 
ity and chivalry which have al- 
ways been theirs. 



Program of the Galloway Literary 
Society for Jan. 8th. 

Declaimer — -W. C. Churchwell. 
Orator — C. G. Terrell. 

Question — “Resolved, That the 
time has come when protective 
tariff should be abolished in the 
United States.” 

Affirmative— R. H. Ruff, C. C. 
Hand, Y. L. Terrell. 

Negative — D. R. Wasson, J. 
A. Alford, B. A. Boutwell. 



A baby fair in need of care. — 
C. C. Hand. 




The Association has received The Rev. Paul B. Kern of 
great inspiration from the recent Xashville.' stopped off on his way 
visit of Mr. Weatherford. One from Rust on. 



Majestic Restaurant. 



ean hardly spend an hour with 
Mr. Weatherford without catch- 
ing a greater vision and receiv- 
ing new inspiration. He is a tre- 
mendous force for good in the 
Young Men’s Christian Associa- 
tion. He helps us to solve our 
problems and overcome the diffi- 
culties in our Association work. 
While here he gave us four ad- 
dresses, in which he urged us to 
* lead pure and honest lives. He al- 
so stressed the importance of Bi- 
ble Study. His speeches had great 
weight with the boys, causing sev- 
eral to take a decided stand for 
the right. We hope Mr. Weather- 
ford will come again. He is al- 
•ways welcome to our Association. 

Our last meeting was conduct- 
ed by Dr. Sullivan. He always 
has something good to tell us. 
Something that will help us to 
overcome temptation. At the close 
of the service Professor Ricketts 
gave us a very helpful talk. We 
greatly appreciate the presence of 
these two members of the faculty 
with us. It gives us encourage- 
ment and makes us feel that they 
are interested in our spiritual 
as well as intellectual de- 
velopment. And let me say 
ju3t here that all the members 
of the faculty are always cordial- 
ly welcome to attend our meet- 
ings. We hope they will come 
as often as they ean and be one 
of us for a little while. We loug 
to see them take a greater inter- 
est in the Association, for not 
only are there many things they 
can do for us, but their very as- 
sociation with us will contribute 
rounds to the building of our 
characters. For as Mr. Weather- 
ford told us, “Character is caught 
not taught.” So how shall we 
build a character worth while 
unless we come in contact with 
superior characters? 

LOST, STRAYED or STOLEN 

One plane and Spherical Trigo- 
nometry — Liberal Reward if re- 
turned to F. Wimberly. 



Several new men have matricu- 
lated since the holidays. 

Prof. Noble hunted bear and 
“dears” in Louisiana during the 
holidays. 

Dr. Kern spent Xmas with 
hoi oiks in Nashville. 

R:"M. Brown, Percy Ricketts, 
D. H. Glass, all “old fellows” 
are back in school again. 

Duke, Ridgway, Huddleston 
and Rainey, with Misses Park, 
Huddleston, Ridgway ano Rick- 
etts went on a very extensive hunt 
during the holidays. 

J. A. Alford was called home 
by a death in his family. 

We are sorry to lose F. W. 
Tinnin, who has entered at Tu- 
lane. 

Will Murrah, ’08. spent the 
holidays at home. 

A thing of beauty is a joy for- 
ever. — E. C .Brewer. 

Annanias outdone. — A. R. 
Peeples. 

God made them, so let them 
pass. — Bailey, Stennis and Mul- 
lins. 

Though ladies frown at him. he 

smiles, 

And thinks himself a king, 

Well thinks he knows their crafts 

and wiles 

But knows not anything. 

— Tom Stennis. 

How of the face proclaims the 
brains. — Bailey, T. L. 

Galloway and Haley had a heat- 
ed discussion whether it is better 
to be a “dead lobster” or a live 
“social lion. 

He blows his horn from morn 
till night, and still no sound comes 
forth. — W. E. Phillips. 

A joy to his mother. — Till. 

Who prated long of beauty’s 
charm, but ne’er looked in the 
glass. — F. S. Williams. 

Taken from my room by mistake 
one dark gray cravenette, with 
red muffler in pocket. Findey 
will please return to Chas R. Rew, 
Cooper House 



Modern — up-to-date 

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Hav e them boiled 

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PHONE 730 

GO TO 

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lower prices. . Prompt deliverty is 
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G. W. SISTRUNK ' 

Handles all Kinds of 

Good things to eat. 

Goods always fresh and prices 
reasonable . 

Give him a trial 

MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Jackson, 1 : Miss. 

Millsaps College otters courses leading 
to two degrees: B. A & B. S. 

For Catalogue, address 

W. B. MURRAH, .Pres. 

Eui 37- a* 
College 

Calendar 

Lyceum Entertainment 
Laurant, The Wizzard 

GREATEST ENTERTAINMENT 
OF THE SERIES 

FRIDAY NIGHT, JAN. 15th. 
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THE PURPLE AND WHITE. 

QUAE FIANT, EX HOCTCOGNOSCES. 



Volume I. Jackson, Mississippi, January 15th, 1909. Number 2. 



ATHLETICS. 

The most important athletic 
event of the week was pulled off 
at Founders’ Hall Monday even- 
ing, when about 35 Freshmen 
met a number of upper classmen 
in a free-for-all, good natured 
fight. It could not be said of the 
upper classmen that they met 
their Waterloo, rather it should 
be said of them that they met 
heir Thermopylae. They fought 
gamely and died bravely, but they 
were greatly outnumbered, and in 
the very heart of the Freshmen 
stronghold. The upper classmen 
were not even allowed to retreat 
with their wounded, and a great- 
er part of them now languish in 
the camp of the Freshmen. The 
defeated classmen also sustained 
heavy losses in the line of hats, 
overcoats and shirts. Although 
defeated for the present, they ar^ 
not dismayed and time only can 
tell what they have in store for 
the Freshmen. 

We are doubtful as to whether 
this should come under the head 
of “college athletics” or not. but 
if so, it is a branch of athletics 
which should be encouraged It 
has not been the custom hereto- 
fore to advocate any such violent 
or extreme measures for the arous- 
ing of class spirit, and no doubt 
the faculty is not inclined to en- 
courage such proceedings, but we 
can see no reason why a friend- 
ly rivalry between the classes 
should not be manifested with our 
college work, and it certainly does 
arouse class spirit, and teaches 
fellows to hang together Of 
course we do not mean to say 
that we are in favor of the 
knock-down and drag-out style, 
but we want to see spirit and en- 
thusiasm in everything at Mill- 
saps. Let every man in college 
think that his class is best and he 
will study harder, hit the line 
harder in foot ball and hit the 
ball harder in baseball, and work 
harder in every phase of college 



life, if he hinks that he has the 
backing of the best class in col- 
lege. There has been more good 
natured rivalry between the class- 
es in the last week than ever be- 
fore at Millsaps College, and all 
we can say is. “More class spirit, 
better classmen; better classmen 
better work.” 

Let us overflow with class spirit 
now, and when the time comes- to 
go to the oratorical contest we 
can all unite in a common cause 
for Millsaps. 

Certainly we propose to make a 
fight for inter-collegiate athlet- 
ics in conference. Isn’t it time 
we weer doing something? 
Haven’t we been idle long enough 
while others made our pleas for 
us? We have all sent long rows 
of “ones” home to our fathers. 
Still that doesn’t seem to help the 
cause any, so it beho oves us to 
try something else, and we see no 
better way than to use good, sol- 
id argument, of which we think 
we have an abundance, in favor 
of athletics. Let each one of you 
take this thought home to vour- 
selg. as individuals in regard to 
inter-collegiate athletics: “If I 

jam not for myself, who is? If I 
am only for myself, what am I? 
If not now, when?” If we are 
J not for ourselves in this matter. 

I who is for us? Rut it is not only 
j for ourselves but for the good 
of Millsaps and everything con- 
nected with it. We arc sincere 
j in our belief that nothing would 
t help our college more than inter- 
collegiate athletics, and what 
| would we be if we advocated the 
question merely for personal rea- 
sons? And if not now, when? 
They tell us to wait patiently, and 
jit will all come around all right, 
j but haven ’t we waited seventeen 
j years, and if now is not the time 
! to forever settle the question of 
inter-collegiate athletics at Mill- 
I saps College, when ? 

The Founder’s Hall “Bull- 
necks” met and defeated the 



Cooper House “Grits” in base- 
ball Saturday afternoon. Both 
teams were in the pink of condi- 
tion and they had the theory of 
baseball down to a very fine point. 
The game was won by the 
“Bullnecks” only by their superb 
heard work, and the masterly 
work of their pitcher, who yield- 
ed only twenty-nine hits, and pass- 
only fifteen men in six innings. 
The “Grits” pitcher also twirled 
in fine form,' but the thirty-one 
'errors behind him lost the game. 
For reasons best known to the 
writer, the batteries are not giv- 
en . 

It is said that “Prep” Terrell 
and Joe Carson broke a track rec- 
ord Monday night. whe s n they 
made the distance from Founders 
Hall to the Quinn House in ten 
seconds flat. 

A Tribute from the Co-Eds. 
“In Loving Remembrance.” 

Alas that thou shouldst go ! 

Alas that we should part ! 

Thy going is our woe. 

The knife is in our heart. 

Xo more within these classic nans 
Thy hearty laugh shall ring, 

Xo more when Kern, “Mr. Bout-, 
well!” calls, 

Thy voice shall answer bring. 

Oh woe it is in English class 
That we see thee not again. 

Was it because tbou couldn’t pass 
Thou gavest us this pain? 

On the Departure of 
Mr. Benjamin Addie Boutwell, 
From Sophomore English Class. 



The people of Ruston are a very 
hospitable people. They threw 
open their homes and gave the 
delegates a cordial welcome. They 
are to be commended for the hear- 
ty support they gave the confer- 
ence. They are held in great es- 
teem by the members of the con- 
ference. and a few of them, I 
think, from what 1 can hear, are 
especially esteemed by some of 
the Millsaps delegates. 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



i 



The Purple and While room or on examination. he not always responded? So suf- 

rrr. , — This form of dishonesty is one fice it to say that the Bobashela is 

ublished Weekly by the Junior of the most h «rtf ill ^nd' prevalent in need of poetry and Whe^ fit- 
Class of Millsaps College. evils in our American colleges to- erary productions. 

day. The only way that we can Remember that it is not intend- 



Editor-in-Cbief. 



ROBT. H. RUFF 

a.J^a B mpbel 0 l NES - • . A Athletic P nt Jt down is to create such a *d that it should be a creation of 



wtoq « 1 DP t DPrn o ' * Athletic EditOT. 

d. r. “a A S * G oT T 8 aum \.m 8 c C a 1 ISf' stron " se ntiment against it that the editors. It is yours! And 

Local Editor. 

a p rrnr' • • • . Business Mahager. 
a. r. KaLLY . . Assistant Business Mgr. f orm 

Matters for pubUcation should be address 
ed to the Editor-in-Chief. All business com 
mumcatios should be sent to M. L. Neill. 



Singls Copy Per Annum Fifty Cents 
Two Copies Per Annum 75 Cents 

College Honor. 



b'u s’i ness| *m ana ire r.* we not tolerate it in any when it appears, you will be re- 

We must stand against sponsible for it. When it is crit- 
this evil as does Gibraltar against icised, it will be as the Millsaps 
the rock destroying waves. 



The Wizard Tonight. 



Annual, and not as Tom Bailey’s. 
Few people, indeed, who see it 
will ever remember the name of a 
single editor! 

The editors have offered a prize 



Y. M. C. A. 



We are fortunate in having a 

We are at the beginning of our s t r °ng lyeeum course again this for the best story, and in addition 
first term examinations and we - vear - This has been made possi- to winning a prize, you may leave 
think a word to the fellows on a member of our faculty, your production as a eulogium up- 

college honor will not be untime- and as a student body we cannot on your work while in college, 
ly . We have no real honor sys- ^ ad sn PP or t him. The cost is So dig up those buried talents 
tem here, every man is placed on Poetically nothing compared and get busy! It is up to you! 

his own honor. However, a man w ^h the benefits. So let us show 

has a chance to cheat on exami- onr appreciation for his interest 
nations if he desires, and possibly by our attendance at the various 
he will never be suspected by the numbers, 
professor. 

The average student coming to and Magician. Lourant the man The meeting Friday night was 
college does not realize what it of man y mysteries. Entertain- conducted by Mr. Welch. He 
means to cheat. He has possibly ments of this nature are always told us of the many good things 
been used to it in his high school interesting, and this will be one that were said and done at the 
work and it has never had a se- of th<? best of its kind. His illus- 
rious aspect to him. He sees a trations and performances are al- 



There have two meetings of the 
Tonight we have me Wizard Association since the last issue. 



Ruston Conference. 

After his talk a short business 
pass and good grades in the end most supernatural. Don t fail to meeting was held, at which two 
and thinks he has commiteed no f ™ f and bring some one. 

harm when he takes help. If the 

grades gained were all. it would The Bobashela. 

not matter so much, but this is 

.not all. There is nothing that is so vital 

First, it is unfair to the honest in the making of a college’s rep- 
student by his side, he is not giv- utation as its publications. Es- 



new members, A . S . Raper and J . 
C. Oswalt, were received. We 
are glad to have these men come 
in with us. We hope that the 
ssoeiation will be a great help to 
them in their Christian life, and 
that they will in turn render val- 
uable service to it. Strong men 
are always needed In me ■n.ssoc?- 



ing him a square deal. It creates pecially is this true of the Annual, 
loose principles which tend to do- It is published only once a year 
feat the very purpose of his ednea- anil is more substantially bound ation. It needs men with such a 
tion. The true enit of a college than any of the publications, and force of character that will con- 
education is to build character, for that reason, is supposed to strain men to follow Christ. If 
and the basic principles of a man’s ”tain the best in the way of po- there are such men here, who are 
life are formed while he is in col- "y. stories and exhibition of col- out of the Association, it should 
lege. Dishonesty lowers the stan- byre spirit. Therefore, it would be our great aim to win these 
dard of our institution as nothing seem unnecessary to appeal to men. 

else can do. And in the end. a live college men in its behalf. On Sunday night Mr. Ruff 
diploma dishonestly gotten is a But they are human and grow gave us an interesting talk on mis- 
discredit to a man, rather than an negligent. I am sure that when sions. He told us how very eager 
honor. . the atetntion of the student body the people of Africa and other for- 

So, to be true to ourselves, our is arrested that they will respond eign countries are to have the 
fellow students and our college, liberally. For since when did a story of Jesus; how that they 
we cannot afford to be dishonest. Millsaps man fail in his dutiv to would come by the thousands and 
At one time it was a proverb that the various interests of his col- some of them from a distance of 
the sense of honor in the Southern lege ? When his class calls for an hundred miles and more, to 
College man was so high that he men to man a foot ball team does hear the missionary, whom they 
would sever his right arm before he not respond? When a call is call “the man of God,” and to be 
he would be dishonest in class ( made for anything worthy, has told of the wonderful Savior of 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 






men. He told us that the barriers 
between the missionaries and the 
people had been broken down, and 
that now instead of being hostile 
to them they looked upon the mis- 
sionary as a great benefactor. 
Mr. Ruff, in closing, urged us to 
consider the call to the foreign 
field. He showed us how urgent 
was the need for srrong men in 
the field ; how that there was only 
one ordained missionary to every 
two hundred and eyrnteen thous- 
and heathen. Mr. Ruff, himself 
has offered his life for service in 
the foreign field. Who will be 
the next -to follow his example? 

Mr. F. S. Williams, who vol- 
unteered for the foreign field at 
the Ruston Conference, will talk 
Sunday night on the volunteer 
movement. We trust that a large 
number of the boys will be out. 

The Committee on Mission 
Study met on the morning of the 
9th, and, as a result of that meet- 
ing. they have ordered one hun- 
dred copies of the life of David 
Livingston. As soon as the books 
arrive, grouped classes, with lead- 
ers. will be formed at the several 
boarding houses and at such other 
places as will be most convenient 
for the students. 

Professor Ervin has himself 
consented to conduct a normal 
mission study class for the benefit 
of the class leaders and secretar- 
ies. 

Let us urge every student to 
get a book and enroll in one of 
the classes. The story of this 
great man is not only instructive 
and inspiring, but it is thrilling as 
a novel. Every one admres the 
man who. fired with a great life 
purpose, surrenders and sacrifices 
every pleasure and ambition to 
the accomplishment of the high- 
er ideal. Such is the story of 
David Livingston. 

SOCIAL. 

Mr. J. W .Frost of the class 
of 1907, was married on New 
Year’s day to Miss Ma'ttye Crow 
of Okland . The date for this 
event had been set for the 6th, but 
Mr. Frost, who is always surpris- 
ing his friends, announced before j 



that day arrived that the wedding eompaniment with the Jews harp, 
j bells had already rung . The The exercises were exeeptional- 
! groom is an alumnus of our col- ly good. But for the interruption, 
lege, but has left his alma mater of Secretary Brewer, who saw Mr. 
[so recently that he still has a ! Mullins and the Jews harp seven 
number of friends on the campus, distinct times, all would nave been 
The Purple and White joins the well. Mr. Carson acquitted him- 
self with much honor. 

The debate, “Resolved, That 
college graduates have done more 1 ' 
for humanity than men without 
We are in receipt of an invita college education,” was spiritedly 
tion to the marriage of Mr. J. F. J debated by Messrs . Gass, Rainey 
j Campbell to Miss Zella Alethea and Green, A. A., on the affirma- 
jLong, on Wednesday. January 13 tive and Messrs. Green. J. W., 
Mr. Campbell is a former stu- Johnson, C. L., and Kirkland L. 
dent of Millsaps, having been en-.C. After the censor’s report,, 
rolled here last session, and even in which Mr. Mullines, through 
part of this. He has a host of the kindess of Mr. Kelly was ex- 
friends among the student body eused from seven fines, responsi- 
who are glad to hear of his good ble to the same Jews harp and in 
fortune and who extend to both which Mr. Gass was likewise ex- 
these young people their best cused for causing Mr. Bailey’s 
wishes for future happiness. downfall, the society adjourned.. 

The bride is a popular young 

lady of Flora. LOCAL DEPARTMENT. 



many other friends of this popu- 
lar young couple in heartiest con- 
gratulations. 



Lamar Literary Society. 

After duly opening the society. 
President Brooks was forced to 
retire, surrendering the chair to 
President Augustus Kelly, who 
wedded the sceptre in quite a la- 
cadoisieal manner. So great was 
the appreciation of his sincere 
earnestness, and so universal was 
his applause at each gracefully 
stanch, that the dulcid notes of 
a Jews harp floated back and 
forth, filling the hall with melo- 
dies well equaling the notes of 
Sousa’s (?) band. It is with great 
regret and deep expression of per- 
sonal regard that we note the faet 
that one of our honorable yea 
very honorable, members of the 
senior class, by accident missed 
connections with his chair and 
came in contact with th? hard sur- 
face of the main building floor. 
Had it not been for the eagle 
eye of Mr. John Crisler. who saw 
at four different intervals , the 
premeditated actions of a crimi- 
nal. he, (the criminal), would as- 
suredly have escaped, for the jar 
caused by Mr. Bailey’s loss of his 
equilibrium, did not awake Vice- 
President Kelly, whose snores 
were wafting sweet notes in ac- [ 



The following publication lias 
appeared up the several buildings, 
which we take pleasure in pub- 
lishing for the benent of the 
Freshmen : 

“Whereas, certain Freshmen 
have been guilty of some of the 
following misdemeanors, be it 
known that after midnight, of 
January 10, 1909. all students are 
forbidden to indulge m the fol- 
lowing praet ices : 

First. Carrying of walking 
canes. 

Second. Wearing of green or 
derby hats. 

Third Wearing of tan shoes, or 
other loud articles . 

Fourth. Standing collars or 
loud ties, and- Barrios are also pro- 
hibite. 

The penalty for violating any 
of the aforesaid rules shall be, 
that the person or persons found 
guilty shall be required to black 
the boots of the higher classmen 
in the rear of the college ehapel. 

(Signed) 

Law and Order League. 

Prof. Moore was prevented 
from meeting his classea-ofi last 
Thursday, on account of a severe 
cold. 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



Exams, begin Monday. 

Subscribe for the Purple and 
White. 

Have you seen our new athletic 
field; it’s a dandy. 

E. H. Mounger of Natchez, has 
recently matriculated. 

Is it true that Luther Neill in- 
tends to move to Ruston ? 

Louvant, the Wizard, will be 
here at the chapel tonight. 

Advice to Belhaven teachers: 
“Cast not your girls before 
swains.” 

On account of bad weather we 
will have chapel only when the 
bell rings. 

We are indebted to the street 
car company for new crossing on 
West street. 

Earnest Mobler of Gulfport, 
was with his friends on the cam- 
pus this week. 

Inspite of all that could be said 
and done, we understand that 
several of our fellows went to the 
“Devil” this week. 

Dr. Kern delivered an interest- 
ing lecture to the young ladies 
of the First Methodist Church 
Wednesday afternoon. 

The contract for the Annual 
has been given. All work and 
pictures must be in by Feb. 15th. 
The Annual will be out by the first 
of May. 



HORRORS OF THE DRINK 
HAEIT. 

Even when things seem most au- 
spicious. the hand of Providence 
comes in with a mighty tread and 
shatters the fond hopes of an ad- 
miring populace. 



THIS DOES NOT AP- 
PLY TO OLD AGE 

Most people under forty years of 
age do not wear glasses to improve vi-> 

. ion. but to get relief from pain and suf- 
fering in one form or ano her. brought 
| on by ceaseiess struggle of the compli- 
cated muscular system of the eyes. The 
! brain demands clear images and the 
| nerves and muscles under the whiplash 
of this demand overcome errors in the 
formation of the eyeballs (Errors of re- 
fraction), by an intense muscular action 
which we term eyestrain 

The object of lbe lenses then is to cor- 
| rect the error by adding to or taking 
from the refractive system of the eye- 
bull, thus doing the work in front of the 
i eye aDd thereby permitting the eye to 
[ see with its nerves and muscles at the 
rest. 

Every case is a jaw unto itself, and 
! the practicion<T must have a thorough 
i knowledge of this intricate visual ap- 
1 paratus in order to meet and overcome 
t he various and varied optical phenom- 
I ina. 

E. R. v. SEUTTER, 

Dr. of Optics, Dr. of Opthalmology 

250 E. Capitol St., Upstairs. 

Jackson, Miss. 

WHEN DOWN TOWN 

Drop in at 

Your Old Friend’s Fountain, for 
BOTH HOT and COLD DRINKS 

J. S. MANGUM, 

At Hunter & McGee’s. 

I HAVE ON HAND 

A number of last year’s Annuals 
and would like to dispose of them. 
Call and see me. 

A. B. CAMPBELL, 

At K. A. House. 

E. H. GALLOWAY, M. D. 

Century Building. 

Jackson, Miss. 



Telephone 8 — 

Majestic Restaurant. 

Modern— up-to-date 



go to 

JACKSON MERCANTILE 
COMPANY. 

for Fancy Groceries and all kinds 
of Feed Stuffs. Same quality at 
lower prices. . Prompt deliverty is 
our motto. 

G. W. SISTRUNK 

Handles all Kinds of 

Good things to eat. 

Goods always fresh and prices 
reasonable . 

Give him a trial 

MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Jackson, Miss. 

Millsaps College offers courses leading 
to two degrees: B. A & B. S. 

For Catalogue, address 

W. B. MURRAH,.Pres. 



Einy a- 

Collegre 

Calen.cL.ar 



Lyceum Entertainment 
Laurant. The Wizzard 

GREATEST ENTERTAINMENT 
OF THE SERIES 

FRIDAY NIGHT, JAN. 15th. 



When the inmates of the 
“shacks” went to eat their soup 
at dinner yesterday, a fly was 
found carefully concealed beneath 
a lusicious piece of tomato. Had 
not the insect been discovered by 
the eagle eye of Ralph Shar- 
brough. who knows what dire re- 
sults might have resulted to those 
drinking the soup. 

Let us always be observant, and 
learn from this narrow escape, 
that the victory is sometimes to 
the slow. 



Solicits your patronage 



When clothes are soiled 
Have them boiled 

Get Eizzy 
Ring Izzy 

Jackson Steam Laundry, 

PHONE 730 



LOST, STRAYED or STOLEN 

One plane and Spherical Trigo- 
nometry — Liberal Reward if re- 
turned to F. Wimberly. 



EVERYBODY COME 




You are inneedcf 
anything in the 
PRINTING LINE 
Phone 1025. 



Don’t Fail to SEE IS Before Giving 
Your Printing Out. 



H e cL erm an 
ErotiieiG. 




THE PURPLE AND 

QUAE FIANT, EX HOC .'COGNOSCES. 



WHITE. 



Volume I Jackson. Aississippi, January 22, 1909 Number 3 



ATHLETICS. 

A meeting of the Athletic As- 
sociation was called Friday morn- 
ing for the purpose of discussing 
the advisability of puieuasing new 
apparatus for the gymnasium. 
While the Association was in ses- 
sion several other matters were 
brought up. 

The meeting was called to or- 
der by President Guinn. Dr. 
Walmsley, the secretary and treas- 
urer of the Athletic Association, 
then explained that Prof. Noble 
had consented to take charge of 
the gymnasium work, provided 
the association would purchase 
new parallel bars and other ap- 
paratus which is very much need- 
ed in the Gym. Dr. Walmley 
then made a statement concern- 
ing the financial condition of the 
association, which disclosed the 
fact that it was about $300 in 
debt. For this amount Professor 
Walmsley stood personally re- 
sponsible to Mr. Brown, the con- 
tractor. for the athletic field. He 
also stated that a considerable 
sum had already been expended 
on the gymnasium this year for 
mats and other paraphenalia . 

Under these circumstances, it 
was not thought wise for the ath- 
letic association to directly ap- 
propriate money for further ex- 
penditure in the Gym., but a mo- 
tion was made by Stennis that the 
chairman appoint a committee 
of members from the Senior Class 
and the Glee Club, to interview 
the management of the Glee Club 
and see if it would be possible 
for them to give a concert, the 
proceeds of which were to go to 
the gym . The motion was carried 
and the chairman appointed Sten- 
nis and Welch from the Senior 
Class and Duke and Williams from 
the Glee Club. 

Campbell then brought up the 
question of inter-collegiate ath- 
letics and stated that the “Purple 
and White” intended to make a 
strong fight for athletics through 
its columns . He then made a 



motion that a committee be ap- 
pointed to canvass the student 
body and ascertain how much 
could be raised on a fund to 
send each individual member of 
the two conferences a copy of the 
paper. The motion was carried 
and the following committee ap- 
pointed: L. C. Kirkland, J. C. 
Wasson, Red Adams. Ramsey, 
Cavett, Stennis and Mullens. 

Before a large and enthusias- 
tic audience of spectators Holmes 
and Spann won out over Morse 
and Reynolds in a hotly contest- 
ed game of “pitching dollars. ” 
We understand that the money 
was furnished by Grafters Wil- 
liams and Neill. Holmes was the 
particvdar star. He was level- 
headed at all stages of the game, 
and it was principally by his 
generosity that his man won. 
Spann also made himself famous 
by kicking a beautiful goal from 
placement. For the losing team 
Captain Morsel played the best 
game. His playing was brilliant 
but erratic. Two costly errors 
on second greatly facilitated his 
opponents’ chances for .victory. 
Reynolds played a very good 
game, but he could not handle 
the net balls to advantage, and 
was also slightly off on his serv- 
ing. 

A fight in the bleachers between 
Gass and Davis, over a decision 
of the 1 umpire, interrupted the 
progress of the game, but the 
belligerants were q lilted by 
Sharborough. the “shack” police- 
man. and they left the game arm 
in arm. 

How many classes have elected 
basket ball managers? There is 
no reason why all of them should 
not be elected now. Of course 
not much could be done in prac- 
tice while exams are in progress, 
but the teams should be ready to 
begin practice immediately fol- 
lowing examinations. Every class 
in college should have a team. 
Even the Senior class ought to be 
able to get out a team with the 



: aid of their co-ed. Members, and 
perhaps by a professor or two . 
Let’s get a regular schedule of 
games and make the coming bas- 
ket ball contest the most spirited 
in our history . 

Don’t you think that if the 
gentleman Dr. Murrah told us 
about would hang around Mill- 
saps for a few days wnde exams, 
are on he would decide that col- 
lege boys can get enthused over 
their books occasionally? 



The leaders of the Bibe classes 
and their secretaries will meet at 
9 o’clock Sunday morning in the 
Y. M. C. A. Hall, and hold for 
30 minutes. The meeting is im- 
portant, don’t fail to come. 



D. R. Wasson will talk on Per- 
sonal work as a Force in College, 
Sunday night in the Y. M. C. A. 
Hall. 



The Volunteer Mission Band. 

The Volunteer Mission Band 
has reorganized since our trip to 
the Students’ Conference, and 
we are now beginning on our last 
term with a determination to ac- 
complish something in our work. 

R. M. Brown was elected lead- 
er and F. S. Williams, secretary 
and treasurer. Our roll consits 
of the following names: R. M. 
Brown, A. C. Anderson, C. C. 
Anderson, Jr., R. ti. Ruff, D. 
R. Wasson, Marley and F. S. 
Williams. 

We expect to begin a system- 
atic study of missions just as soon 
as the books arrive, and we hope 
we will have the co-operation and 
support of the entire student body 
in our work. 

We have had three new volun- 
teers since our reorganization, 
and hope that our work will be 
rewarded with several more be- 
fore the session closes. 

Surely, there is no greater work 
to be accomplished than the work 
of the Volunteer Band. 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



The Purple and White throu gh the papers and magazines Athletics and the World’s Work. 

— — if nothing else. A man should 

Published Weekly by the Junior keep in touch with the work, of That this is pre-eminently the 



Class of Millsaps College. 



ROBT. H. BUFF 



Editor-in-Cbief. 



A. 1 A ca R m^el°l NES - • . A BBSSS Editor* are t0 be found 0n the exchange 

ESXXSSg*? 8AUM8 Y . Ife {able • 

JOHN QA88 Local Editor. 



M. L. NEILL 
A. F. KELLY 



Business Manager. 



the other colleges by reading age of development is a fact be- 
their papers and magazines which yond doubt and cavil. 

Today man seems to have reach- 
ed the zenith of his power, the 
A college man should form the world the “high ^ier mark” 



- Asai8tant Ba3ine3a Mgr - 1 habit of reading one good book of civilization, when tomorrow 



re- 



Matters for publication should be address- nTrnpTr -.i__ . , 

ed to the Editor-in-chief, aii business com ev,r - two week3, every one is * 1 - veals some new scheme, invention 

municatios should be sent to M. h. Neill. ■ 1 ’ 



lowed by the librarian to keep it or discovery, that throws existing 
S Two‘copi?,pVr Annum ° Ut this long ' ^ readin S 1 bo » k conditions and methods into ob- 



College Library. 



e\ ery 2 weeks you are enabed livion, and that causes men to 
to read sixteen during the year ask, where will it all end! 



or sixty-four during your college New standards of life are con- 
Very few college men fully ap- course ■ This is a great educa- stantly being set up. Business 
preciate the opportunity that a *' on itself. methods once considered the ul- 

college library affords. It would You can do much of this work timate of nonsense are replacing 
be hard to place too much stress ' n sl,ck a wa y as to never miss those that have been used for dec- 
on this opportunity. This is a ^ be time. At night when you are ades. The modern scientists 
part of a man’s education that he tired with your studies, you can teach accepted trutxs that only a 
can’t afford to neglect. pick up an interesting book and few days ago would have been 

A student on entering college rea< ! several chapters and your considered the babble of lunatics, 
is in a plastic state as regards his m * nd be fresh. The mind yea, almost blasphemy, while in 
habits and tastes, these are form- does n °t need rest so much as it politics, as nowhere else, radical- 



ed during his four years in col- nee( ls variety, 
lege and will have much to do in 



[ism is the trend of the day. Pol- 
So men, let s don’t miss this iticians hold one view today, only 
making or maring his future. To £ rea t opportunity. We have one to advocate another on the mor- 
acquire a taste for good literature the bes t libraries in the South, row. "Verily this is the strenuous 
and to form the habit of careful, b y means of which we are enabled 
constant reading i 3 an education to come into contact with the 

, greatest minds of the past and 



Needless to say thesecondjtions 
call for all round men. trained 
men who can think and act under 
the most trying circumstances, 
money has been put in it and wko h as facts, figures and statis- Then, obviously man must be ed- 
very few students will possibly tics at his tongue’s end, is always ucated in the requisites of the 
ever hav e such another opportuni- a f° r ce. 



within itself. 

Our library is the result of time P re sent. Now is the time to pre- 
and labor. A large amount of P ara yourself for life. The man 



age. 



ty. The books are selected by 
men of ta3te and judgment and 
there is no chance for one to ac- 
quire a taste for a cheap grade 
of literature. 



Get Your Collegians. 



The Collegians that remain aft- 
This is a phase of college life cr the distribution in the chapel 



age’s successful man. And it is 
to call attention to the value of 
athletics as a means of obtaining 
the desired training that this ar- 
ticle is written. 

In the first place athletics de- 
velop consistency which is said to 
be a rare jewel. The successful 



that is not required, being whol- on the morning of their issue, are 
ly optional, but by doing things placed in the reading room of the I athlete must be a consistent play- 
that are not compulsory, we do library. Call and get them, and er above everything else. He 
much towards developing strength read them. It is a college man’s must subordinate “starring” for 
of character. A man who does magazine and worth reading from “team-work. ” So it is in the 
no more than is required of him, cover to cover, not forgetting the business world and life. The 
is a slave, but the man who does advertisements. Certainly every j many successful changes of today, 



more, is a free man. 

It causes a man to economize read the Millsaps Collegian, 
in his time, he will cut out things However, if you are not a lover 



Millsaps man ought to take and which seem at first glance the 

work of a day, are found upon 
closer investigation to be the 



that are not essential in order to of good literature, at east take 
go to the library. There is no your copy and send it home or 



work of months, yea, of years. 
Thus athletics tend to teach the 
better antidote for loafiing and somewhere else — there is always first requisite of success, consist- 

library' | someone who is interested in Mill- jency, or, as some may choose to 



idleness 

habit.” 



than this 



j saps mainly because you are there 



Spend at least two or three and he (or she) will appreciate 
hours each week reading the cur- the magazine the more if it comes 
rent news. Go in and look ( from you. 



call it, endurance. 

Again, the “man of today” 
must be nervy and capable of in- 
dependent action. In this day 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



and time the man who is afraid to 
risk anything or to act alone when 
occasion calls for such, is lost. 
It is almost an axiom that, “to | 



cess of the work will depend 
largely on the class eader. It is 
to be hoped that the leaders will 
put forth every effort to keep 



Whether it is due to the “Hon- 
or System,” or to poor “jack- 
ing,” we are unable to say, but 
certain it is, a great many stu- 



win, one must risk. ” Nor do we J their classes live and working, dents are “busting” on exams. 



Get busy and have your picture 



mean rashness, when we say We feel sure, that under the ef- 

nerve . But we do mean a wil- ficient leadership of our normal ma( j e f or the Annual The work 
lingness to act when the chances leader. Dr. Kern, and with the in- mus t be in by Feb. 15. The An- 
are anything like e^uai. And if spiration that some of them re- nua i w j]l be a failure unless your 
there is any one requisite of the j ceived at the conference* these picture is in it 
athlete, it is the ability, or wil- leaders will accomplish great 

good . To be the leader of a class 



Dr. Kern, (in Junior English 

class — Mr. Enochs, what three 
affords a splendid opportunity for , . , ~ . , c , ■ 

r J kinds of poetry do we find in 



lingness to tak e chance when nec 
etsary. 

In the third place, athletics call doing persona work. It gives a \ n f,j 0 Saxo^nT 
for and develop the ability to man the privilege of directing, to Epjc Lyrje flnd Paregoric 
think on one ’s feet and in a pinch, j a eertain extent, the conversation, 

The demand of the world today the thoughts and the very lives 



I. C. Enochs — 
Paregoric . 

The Millsaps Quartette was da- 
is for men who can think in a of those of his class. We"are 1 ^ htfully entertained Tuesday 

crisis, men who have “head- glad to have such good attend- P ' PI ^ n .^ at ^ r ‘ ’ 

work.” And if there is any place ance and we urge every man in ’ ai, A on treet. e 

in the world where crises arise college to join one of these P res< npp 0 se\ era y oung a les 

thick and fast and have to be groups. He cannot afford to leave ^ a e e evenings 

met with instantly, that place is off the Bible study, for several en j°y nlPn t- 



in athletic contests. 



Gans Johnson says that Pearl 



If you think it doesn’t pay to 



reasons, first, because the Bible is 

But to us. the greatest good God’s message to us, and we Ri ver water is bad enough, but 
of athletics is, that one who really should not be ignorant of his will when it comes to drinking the wa- 
succeeds therein must be sober in concerning us. Second, it is an tpr f rom Laurant’s black bottle- 
life and not only sober, but also essential part of our education. !!!!! ■ ? • 
honest. He, who would succeed j A man is not considered educated 
in sport must not be dissipated, j unless he knows something about advertise in “Purple and White.” 
Even the smallest amount of dis- the Bible. But even if we should just remember the large crowd of 
sipation will often ruin a man’s get nothing from the study of the people who attended our last Ly- 
chances of “making good. ” And Bible itself, the close friendships ceum number. The attraction 
so it is in life. The day has come that are formed with the members was advertised in this paper. 

In Freshman Latin class the oth- 



when the drinker, the gambler, jof a group will be of lasting ben- 
or he who is dissipated in any | efit. 
way is being set adrift like so 
much dqadwodd by many con- 
trolling corporations. More than 
that, the day is fast approaching 
when the dissipator will find no 
berth in a responsible position. 

And in spite of all opposition, 
we still think that athetic3 are 
valuable as a force for training 
men for th e world’s work. 



Y. M. C. A. 

The Bible Class met Wednes- 
day night and nearly every man 
was present. This one feature 
shows that the new plan of Bible 
Study is going to be a success. 
With the classes meeting at night, 
in the boarding houses, it is con- 
venient for every one and if any 
happens not to come the secretary 
can step around to his room and 
bring him in. Since the attend- 
ance is going to be good the suc- 



LOCAL DEPARTMENT. 

Cram, 

Exam, 

Flunk. 

Trunk. 

How old was Anne, anyhow? 

Subscribe for the Purple and na l this week 
White . 

A. C. Anderson has been elect- 
ed treasurer of the G. L. S. 

Neither of the societies or Y. 

M. C. A. will have a meeting to- 
night. 

For special policeman and de- 
tective work, apply to C. E. 

Holmes. 

John Bratton wants to know: 

“Who wrote Myer’s History of 
Ancient Greece?” 

It is rumored that Miss Austin 
is writing a novel entitled, “The 
Chivalrous Law Student. ” 



er day Dr. Swartz, in discussing 
the probability of there ever hav- 
ing been a Trojan horse, used as 
an example the following illustra- 
tion: “Why, Mr. Enochs, do you 
really believe George Washington 
cut down the apple tree ? ’ ’ 

Some of the boys wonder why 
Dr. Sullivan is looking so pater- 
If they roomed in 
the vicinity of his house, they 
would know that there is a new 
co-ed there. 

There has been a great deal of 
jubilation lately among the dele- 
gates from Ruston, La., responsi- 
ble to the receipt of several let- 
ters. Messrs. Peeples and Camp- 
bell, A. B., received notes of 
thanks, acknowledging the receipt 
of “the pretty little book” they 
so kindly sent. 

A quintette, composed of 
Messrs. Anderson, Buck, Gwin. 
Williams and Wright, rendered 
some very fine music at the Y. M. 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



C. A. Hall Sunday evening. 
Something of thi3 kind has been 
needed for a long time, and it is 
certain that the efforts of these 
young men will be greatly appre- 
ciated . 

- One of the “preps” from the 
“piney woods” visited a barber 
shop the other day, and not wish- 
ing to leave anything undone, 
called for a shoe shine. The 
“shine” looked at the number 
elevens resting on the foot rest, 
and turning away, said. “Boss, 
you doesn’t take me for a house 
painter, does you?” The “prep” 
bought some Shinola, and now 
shines his own shoes. 



Very Pretty Marriage. 

The following report of the Bur- 
well-Dyer marriage of Lexington, i 
from the current issue of the Lex- 
ington Advertiser, is of murh lo- 
cal interest, the groom being a 
graduate of Millsaps College and i 
is well and favorably known in 
this city: 

hTe marriage of Mr. Stephen 
Luse Burwell and Miss Mary 
Keim Dyer was solemnized at I 
the Methodist Church Tuesday 
morning at 10:30 o’clock. The 
chancel was transformed into a 
springtide bower o» palms and 
ferns and other tropical foliage. 
Behind this screen of emerald 
beauty, Miss Lindholm’s magic 
touch on the organ, mingled with 
the rich notes of Mr. Joe Levy’s 
violin for the entry ana recession- 
al music, and in softened cadence 
during the ceremony solemnly and 
impressively said by Rev. J. W. 
Dorman. 

The bridal pair were preceded 
to the altar by the ushers, Mr. 
Brooke Burwell, Mr. Claude 
Keirn. Mr. Lester Barr and Dr. 
Jack Ewing of Vicksburg. 

The fair bride’s toilette was 
electric bue broadcloth with hat 
to harmonize and she carried 
American, Beauty roses 

The 11 o’clock train bore the 
happy pair away to the Southland 
of blue skies and golden sunshine, 
which we hope will always arch 
over their coming days. 

Miss Dyer is the bright and 
charming daughter of Hon. and 



Mrs. James Monroe Dyer. 

Mr. Burwell is one of the most 
iyloung aia..6$a ia..$aia . 

' talented and progressive young 
business men in the State, and 
claims a large circle of friends 
and admirers. The union of the 
two aristocratic families is an 
event full of interest and elicited 
warmest felicitations. 

The out of town guests were: 
Mrs. Nolan Stewart and Mrs. E. 
F. Noel of Jackson ; Mr. and Mrs. 
Brooke Burwell of Ebenezero Dr. 
and Mrs. McDonald of Durant; 
Mr. and Mrs. Will Burwell, Dr. 
Jack Ewing of Vicksburg; Mrs. 
James M. Dyer. Jr., and Mr. 
Howard Dyer of Glendora. 

Mr. and Mr.s Burwell receiv- 
ed a number of beautiful present s . 



Found. 

A fountain pen. Owner can 
receive same by proving the 
property and paying all the charg- 
es of this advertisement. 

A. A’. Kern. 



THIS DOES NOT AP- 
PLY TO OLD AGE 

Most people under forty years of I 
age do not wear glasses to improve vis- | 
ion, but to get relief from pain and suf- | 
fering in one form or another, brought 
on by ceaseless struggle of the compli- 
cated muscular system of the eyes. The 
brain demands clear images and the 
nerves and muscles under the whiplash I 
of this demand overcome errors in the 
formation of the eyeballs (Errors of re- 
fraction), by an intense muscular action 
which we term eyestrain. 

The object of lhe lenses then is to cor- 
rect the error by adding to or taking 
from the refractive system of the eye- 
bull, thus doing the work in front of the 
eye and thereby permitting the eye to 
see with its nerves and muscles at the ( 
rest. 

Every case is a jaw unto itself, and 
the practicioner must have a thorough 
knowledge of this intricate visual ap- 
paratus in order to meet and overcome 
the various and varied optical phenom- 
ina. 

E. R. v. SEUTTER, 

Dr. of Optics, Dr. of Opthalmology 

250 E. Capitol St., Upstairs. 

Jackson, Miss. 

WHEN DOWN TOWN 

Drop in at 

Your Old Friend’s Fountain, for 
BOTH HOT and COLD DRINKS 

J. S. MANGUM, 

At Hunter & McGee’s. 

E. H. GALLOWAY, M. D. 

Century Building. 

Jackson, Miss. 



go to 

JACKSON MERCANTILE 
COMPANY. 

for Fancy Groceries and all kinds 
of Feed Stuffs. Same quality at 
lower prices. . Prompt deliverty is 
our motto. 

G. W. SISTRUNK 

Handles all Kinds of 

Good things to eat. 

Goods always fresh and prices 
reasonable . 

Nice line of Stationery on hand 

Give him a trial 

I HAVE ON HAND 

A number of last year’s Annuals 
and would like to dispose of them. 
Call and see me. 

A. B. CAMPBELL, 

At K. A. House. 

Telephone 8 — 

Majestic Restaurant. 

Modern — up-to-date 

Solicits your patronage 



When clothes are soiled 
Have them boiled 

Get Eizzy 
Ring Izzy 

Jackson Steam Laundry, 

PHONE 730 
MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Jackson, Miss. 

Millsaps College offers courses leading 
to two degrees: B. A <fc B. S. 

For Catalogue, address 

W. B. MURK AH, Pres. 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 
College Photographer. 

Jackson, 

Miss. 

Capitol St., near Bridge. 



HERERMAN BROS. 
Printers and Publishers 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



Volume I. 



ATHLETICS. 



The Varsity Foot Ball Team. 

At the first meeting of the Ath- 
letic Association last rail, it was 
decided that the Athletic Com- 
mittee of the faculty should se- 
lect from the various class teams 
an all-class or varsity team, and 
that only varsity men would have 
the privilege of wearing the 
“M’s” at Millsaps. This com- 
mittee was composed of Dr. 
Kern. Prof. Moore and Dr. 
TValmley, all of them good judges 
of what it takes to make a foot 
ball player, and close students 
of the game. After the season 
closed, fifteen men were selected, 
and full right has Millsaps to be 
proud of her team. 

In writing up me “Varsity 
team.” it shall not only be my 
purpose to show tnat the men 
who wear the “M” for Millsaps 
are representative foot ball men 
and form a representative team, 
but that they are men in whom 
you will find represented every 
phase of college life. I will go 
further than that and say that 
they are the leaders at Millsaps 
College. It is said that the prin- 
cipal argument used against in- 
ter-collegiate athletics, is that 
the teams, when away from col- 
lege. would indulge in all kinds 
of immoral practices, and that 
they would become so engrossed 
in athletics that they would lose 
all sight of their other work. 
But we refuse to believe that 
anybody would be inclined to 
make such a statement concern- 
ing any member of our ’Varsity 
foot ball team. 

Every man on the team is a 
member of the Y. M. C. A., 
and mcsi of them have at some 
time held offices in the Associa- 
tion . All fifteen of them are 
members of the literary societies. 
\nd nine-tenths of them are now 
.elding oT‘" J ial positions in the J 
societies. We find on this team 
the three business managers of 
the college publications, the Ed- 
itor-inChief of the Annual, the 
President of the Y . M . C . A . . | 
a student volunteer, and the man 
who made the brightest grades in 
his class for three years. None 
of these boys ever played foot 
ji'all before they came to Millsaps. 
»nd what they know about foot 
ball, they learned on our campus, 
but with a little coaching, we 
would be willing to see them go 
jnp against any team in Mississip- 
pi without the least fear. 

Taking up the individual mem- 
bers of the team we have first. 
Captain Peeples, he weighs 145 
pounds and is 5 feet and 8 inches 
tall. “Rip” is the lightest man 
'on the team, and yet he gains as 
much ground as any of the heavy , 
fellows. He is a, sensational 
player, and will break through 
the line for a long run just at 
the time it is least expected. Not 



QUAE FIANT, EX HOC COGNOSCES. 



Jackson, Mississippi, January 29, 1909. 



Number 4. 



only is he par excellence at car- 
rying the ball himself, but he 
makes fine interference for “the 
man behind.” Peeples shows 
good headwork. and can always 
be relied upon. He has yet to 
master the use of the “stiff arm.” 
and when this is acquired it will 
greatly accelerate his ground 
gaining qualities. On defense, he 
is an expert at keeping his eye 
on the ball, and is a deadly tack- 
ier. On account of partial ob- 
jections. he did not play ball in 
his Freshman year, but was right 
half on the champion team this 
year. He is a member of the 
Kappa Alpha fraternity; censor 
in L.L. S. ; Y. M. C. A. dele- 
gate to Ruston; ’Varsity base ball 
’08: Soph. Basket Ball ’08; Cap- 
tain of Mississippi team at Rus- 
ton. La.; Sophomore 

In R. 0. Jones, manager and 
left end Millsaps boasts of her 
best all round athlete. “Ro.” 
weighs 150 pounds, is six feet tall 
and eighteen years old. He is 
what might be termed a “born 
athlete,” and takes to football 
like a clean kid to a tar bucket . 
But not only in foot ball is he a 
star, but in tennis, basket ball and 
foot ball he shines with equal 
brilliancy. His “head work” in 
athletics has made him famous. 
Few of us will forget how he won 
the game for Millsaps against 
Tulane last spring by the use of 
his noodle. Jones is fast on his 
feet, an excellent tackier and has 
few equals when it comes to 
handling the forward pass. He 
is also in the top-notch when it 
comes to advancing the ball. No 
man is quicker to see an opening, 
and when once clear, it takes a 
man who can do a hundred in the 
flat to catch him. Kappa Alpha; 
half back and captain on Fresh- 
man team ’07 ; end half back and 
manager on Soph, team ’08; 
’Varsity Base Ball ’06; ’Varsity 
baseball team ’08; Soph. 

In “Bill” Bailey, left tackle, 
we have a man who is not only 
a foot ball player of superior 
ability, but is universally recog- 
nized as the most influential man 
in college. He tips the beam at 
170 pounds, is 5 feet, 9 inches tall 
and twenty-one years of age. 
“Bill” is fast and muscular, and 
is not afraid to tackle anything 
that plays foot ball, as was evin- 
ced in Ruston . He was the main 
stay of his team in ’08. and it wa s 
only his personal efforts that the 
team was enabled to complete 
their schedule. But it cannot be 
said that the “judge” is most at 
home on the gridiron — rather, 
give him a literary society hall, 
where he uses his fluent vocabu- 
lary to advantage and displays 
his marked oratorical abilities. 
He has covered himself with hon- 
ors since the hour he entered 
school, and while it has not been 
officially decided, it i3 generally 
understood that Mr. Bailey will 



represent Millsaps at the next M. 
I. O. A. Sophomore orator 
’06; Historian Sophomore class 
’06 ; Mid-Session Debater ’06 ; 
President L. L. S. ’07; Com- 
mencement Debater _ ’08 ; Repre- 
sentative to Whitworth Chautau- 
qua ’08; Collegian Short Story 
Medal ’06 and ’07 ; Local Editor 
Collegian ’07- ’08; Editor-in-Chief 
Bobashela ’08- ’09; twice a dele- 
gate to Ruston; Manager Found- 
ers’ Hall ’07- ’08; Freshman foot- 
ball ’05- ’06; Sophomore football 
’06- ’07; Right half on Freshman 
team of ’08; Manager and right 
half on victorious Mississippi 
team at Ruston; Kappa Sigma 
and member of Senior class. 

“Prep” Wasson is the man of 
whom we boast when good grades 
are mentioned. Nor do we re- 
main silent when the question of 
line-bucking and play-smashing 
is brought up, but we at once 
think of our 180 pound “prep.” 
He is 6 feet tall, and twenty-three 
years of age. There is not a 
pound of surplus flesh on him . 
It is all bone and muscle, and with 
the proper amount ox coaching, 
“Prep” Wasson could be made 
one of the best guards this side of 
the Mason and Dixon line. He 
was elected for the position of 
guard on the ’Varsity, although 
he originally played at tackle. 
Y. M. C. A. ; delegate to Rus- 
jton; Oakley Scholarship prize; 
Vice-President Y. M. C. A.; 
Chairman Membership Commit- 
tee Y. M. C. A. ; Secretary G. 
L. S. ’09. Y. M. C. A. Editor 
Purple and White ; Full back on 
Sophomore team ’07 ; Right tack- 
le on Junior team ’08; Junior. 

Few will forget Terrell’s line- 
j plunging in the football games 
last, and so impressed was the 
[ committee with his work that they 
i selected him as left half back on 
| the ’Varsity. He is twenty-one 
years of age. 5 feet and 3 inches 
tall and weighs about 155 pounds. 

.“ Blair" hitf- v'lLa. Unr> Unr-it am ] low 

| and when once started, there is 
no stopping horn snort of eight 
or ten yards. He is not only a 
ground gainer of exceptional abil- 
ity himself, but is second to none 
when it comes to pushing an- 
other man through the line. On 
defense “Bish” has broken up 
many a play, and his hard tack- 
ling is the terror of his oppo- 
nents. Above everything else 
Terrell is consistent with his play- 
ing. and this is one indispensible 
quality in a good football player. 
Assistant Business Manager Col- 
legian ’08- ’09: Vice-President 

Sophomore Class ’07- ’08: Secre- 
tary G. L. S. ’07- ’08: Left Tackle 
on Freshman team ’06: Right 

half on Sophomore team ’07 : Man- 
ager Sophomore base ball team 
’08: Kappa Alpha: Junior. 

With “Prep” Welch at right 
guard we fear no harm. He is a 
strone. fearless player, and with 
his 170 pounds of brawn his is a 



power to be coped with. He is 
twenty-four years of age and 6 
feet tall. “ Prep has been a 
recognized leader among the stu- 
dents of Millsaps for several 
years, and some of his stunts will 
long be talked of on our campus. 
He is a good, all round college 
man, and is always overflowing 
with college spirit. President 
Founder’s Hall Club ’06- ’07; for 
three years steward at Founder’s 
Hall; President G. L. S. ; ’07- ’08; 
Secretary G. L. S. ’08- ’09; 
President Y. M. C. A. ’08- ’09; 
twice a delegate to Ruston; Class 
Historian ’07- ’08; Class Secretary 
'08- ’09; Y. M. C .A. Editor for 
Collegian ’07- ’08; Business Man- 
ager Collegian ’08- ’09; Com- 
mencement Debator '08; Class 
Orator Patriot’s Day ’07; Center 
on Sophomore football team ’06; 
right guard on Sopohmore foot- 
ball team ’08; Right guard on 
Mississippi team at Ruston; 
Senior. 

Galloway at full-back has been 
a star on the champion Sophomore 
team, and no doubt he can star 
still more at his old position with 
such men as Terrell and Peeples 
as running mates on the ’Varsity. 
He weighs 168 pounds, i3 5 feet, 

4 inches tall and twenty-one years 
of age. He probably gained 
more ground on his team last year 
than any other man. He rarely 
ever failed to gain the required - " 
distance on last down, with 
from one to four yards to gain. 
He is also a fine interferer and 
puts his man out of the way 
without the slightest tendency to 
use hands and arms . Galloway is 
a very valuable player on defense, 
as his tackling is hard and clean. 
Half-back on Prep, team ’06 ; full 
back on Fresh, team ’07; full back 
and captain Soph, team ’08 ; Kap- 
pa Sigma; Sophomore. 

In Charlton Jones we have a 
| quarter-back of exceptional abil- 
ity, and with a bright football 
’ ca r e e r ttrfore him . Tie is 
teen years old, 5 feet and 11 inch- 
! es tall, and weighs 160 pounds. 

As Captain and half-back of his 
team of ’08 he was the bright and 
particular star. He rarely ever 
loses his head in a game, and at 
most stages of the game his con- 
ception of plays i3 perfect. He 
can easily punt fifty yards and has 
no equal in school in executing 
the forward pass. Prep baseball 
team ’08; captain and half-back 
on Prep, foot ball ’08; Third Year 
Preparatory. 

Applewhite showed up so well 
at end on the Junior team ’08 
that he was selected for right 
end on the ’Varsity, and a wise 
selection it was. Ralph is nine- 
teen years old, i3 5 feet and 11 
inches tall and weighs 165 
pounds. He is a heady, consis- 
tent player, fast down the field 
and a good tackier. As a catcher 
of forward passes he is in a class 
Continued on Page 3). 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



The Purple and White 



Published Weekly by the Junior 
Class of Millsaps College. 



ROBT. H. RUFF . . Editor-in-Cbief. 

L. BARRETT JONES. . Associate Editor. 

A. B. CAMPBELL Athletic Editor. 

MISS MARGARET SAUMS . Social Editor. 
D. R. WASSON . . . . Y. M. C. A. Editor. 
JOHN GASS Local Editor. 

M. L. NEILL .... Business Manager. 
A. F. KELLY . . Assistant Business Mgr. 



Matters for publication should be address- 
ed to the Editor-in-Chief. All business com 
municatios should be sent to M. L. Neill. 



Application made for entry as second-class 
matter at the Postofflce at Jackson. Miss. 



Singls Copy Per Annum FHty Cents 
Two Copies Per Annum 75 Cents 



EDITORIAL. 



Athletics. 



to a live college. This can never 
be done with class games. It is 
true that our inter-class games 
were a success in many ways this 
season, but it was due to the fact 
that the fellows were looking for- 
ward to intercollegiate football, 
and were using this as a stepping 
stone. 

We believe that this is a phase 
of college life that cannot be neg- 
lected without serious harm to 
our college. We are sure that the 
men back of our college are men 
who would not knowingly do any- 
thing that would harm the col- 
lege in the least. As students 
and patrons, we all desire a Great- 
er Millsaps. 



In making a fight for inter- 
collegiate athletics we desire to 
show the conferences our side of 
the question in a fair and square 
way. We believe that the recent 
action taken was done in good 
faith, but that they did not have 
full light on the subject. The 
objections were sustained, because 
we were not expecting a fight 
and consequently did not have a 
representative there. 

Many of the men who voted on 
this question know nothing of 
college athletics. They have seen 
the professional side of athletics 
such as Sunday ban games and 
the other evils and judge college 
athletics to hold the same bane- 
ful results. But such is not the 
case. There is a sharp distinc- 
tion between the two. each having 
different ends in view. 

Some hold gambling as an ob- 
jection to intercollegiate athlet- 
ics. It is true that is an evil in 
some of the colleges, hut it has 
never manifested itself here. 
Barring us from playing until ath- 
letics is purified is worth} 7 of be- 
ing placed along with the like 
idea that a boy should not go in 
water until he learns to swim . 

The argument that it lowers 
the scholarship which is held by 
some, is really the weakest. Be- 
fore a man can play on any team 
here, even a class team, he must 
make a certain grade on all his 
studies. The regulation was rig- 
idly enforced during the past 
season, several o f the best, pi av- 
ers in school being knocked off. 
Furthermore a student i3 requir- 
ed to have a certain amount of j 
work, which knocks out the idea I 
that a boy can come here just to 
play ball, and do nothing else. 
The conference heard of a few 
who failed on examinations who 
had taaen part in athletics, and 
concluded that this was the cause, 
but there w ill be some men 
“bust” even if there is no ath- 
letics of any kind. 

We ask you to carefully inves- 
tigate the conditions here in re- 
gard to athletics and its various 
details, and see if the most influ- 
ential men in college are not men 
who are equally interested in the 
athletic life. Only in the last 
few days three of our men who 
played on the winning football 
team at Ruston, volunteered for 
the foreign field. 

Without intercollegiate athlet- 
ics we can never develop that 
eolleee snirit which is necessary 



What the Athletic Association 
Means to the College. 



The athletic association means 
to the college three things in 
particular: college organization 
college spirit and physical exer- 



cise. 



A college education today is in- 
finitely wider than in our fathers’ 
day. The pale cloistered student 
is no longer the idea, held up be- 
fore us, we are taught to admire 
the man who has developed his 
manifold nature so that in class 
and out of class lie is a man of 
power, one who is a leader and 
not a “blind mouth. ” As a re- 
sult, the world looks today for 
college men to direct it. whereas 
in the last generation the college 
man was at a discount in the 
world of life. The active world 
was not altogether to blame at a 
time when it was considered a 
compliment to call a man a 
“book-worm” and to say that he 
was in his room studying when 
other men were on the battlefield. 
Today the business firm, or the 
trustees of the Rhodes fund, want 
a statement that the man was a 
leader in the college organizations 
Of all these forms of organiza- 
tions the athletic association is 
the most democratic, every other 
has some limitation of member- 
ship. but this is the one in which 
every man can make himself felt 
as a motive power. 

f very pliace nf ,v> „ v ’y ■'*- 

life shall develop college spirit if 
his college is worthy of a spirit, 
but for this purpose the athletic 

association is especially fitted. 
Every man in whose veins runs 
good red Anglo-Saxon blood lov- 
es a contest, and every step in 
the upward march of the individ- 
ual, the church, the nation, has 
been gained after a “good 
fight in which the faith was well 
kept. Personally I gravely sus- 
pect the moral strength of the 
man who is not ready to throw 
his heart and body into a good, 
clean fight for his cause, whether 
it be the cause of a Paul at Ephe- 
sus, a Luther at "Worms or a Lad 
Jones in a Yale-Harvard football 
game. College men will manifest 
their spirit whenever thir man 
wins in an inter-collegiate ora- 
torical contest, an inter-collegiate 
debate, in any inter-collegiate fea- 
ture. but in the nature of things 
there contests are more spectac- 
ular and better fitted to focus in- 



terest when in the athletic line. 
Some of us fondly dream that 
had we the making of human na- 
ture, we would make it perfect, 
that all men would be moved by 
the highest ethical motives to per- 
sue a hard course unwaveringly 
for the sake of its ultimate ad- 
vantage, but to be absolutely hon- 
est we never were such paragons 
ourselves. I am old enough to 
acknowledge that it was the in- 
cidents of life that moved me 
mor e when I was a boy than great 
principles of duty; that my spir- 
it of enthusiasm was more aroused 
by the Sunday Sehoo? picnic than 
by the Sunday School ethics. I 
have known many a man gradu- 
ally developed into a student and 
later into a useful man. whose on- 
ly interest in his college at first 
was that he might help beat a 
neighboring college at baseball. 
The one crying need of Millsaps 
today is more college spirit, a far 
graver need than for more profes- 
sors, more salary and more con- 
crete walks. 

Today it is almost useless to 
call attention to the need of phys- 
ical exercise, ever} 7 business man 
is waking up to the fact that his 
success depends largely upon his 
physical nature. A prominent 
business man of Jackson tells me 
that he is especially interested in 
what we do for his boy physical- 
ly, because the pressure of busi- 
ness is becoming so strenuous that 
the boy must have a better phys- 
ical foundation and more nervous 
energy than the father. Mat Nor- 
ton says that the nervous strain 
today is about twenty-five times 
as great as it was fifty years since. 
When we face the increasing 
number of suicides, of cases of in- 
sanity and of nervous break-down, 
when we see the president of a 
great steel trust collapsing after 
six months’ work from the mental 
strain, we see that we must do 
more for our physique than was 
done in the day of our fathers 
with their amatively simple life. 
To accomplish this purpose espe- 
cially the athletic association is 
organized, and there is no one 
institution which the college, as 
an organizat ion needs so much to 



opportunity of development to the 
largest possible number of stu- 
dents. our system of inter-class 
games very nearly approximates 
this end. Last season no fewer 
than fifty men were called into 
service by the several class foot- 
ball teams. This spring a much 
larger number will go into base- 
ball . Our system glv*-s every man 
who has any aspiration to become 
an athlete, a chaneo to display 
his physical qualities. 

To make things more interest- 
ing. it might be suggested that 
our inter-class contests be unified. 
Let each class have a team in 
football, baseball, basketball and 
tennis. The classes play rather 
for the year’s athlervc champion- 
ship than for the championship 
of baseball or football. In this 
way our interest would be sus- 
pended through the entire year. 

Field Day also mtgnt be observ- 
ed as a further means of keeping 
our athletic spirit from flagging. 
On this day the decisive games of 
the season might be played, con- 
tests on the track and a gymna- 
sium exhibition, might also be 
given. This would be a very fit- 
ting year to begin The observ- 
ance of field day because our new 
athletic field comes into use. The 
naming of the field might be done 
with proper ceremony on such a 
day this spring. 

In conclusion, I should urge 
that we lose no opportunity to in- 
terest all of the students in ath- 
letics. 

There are numbers of men who 
are physically capable to render 
us good service on the athletic 
field if they would but overcome 
a little indisposition The call of 
the classes should be so urgent 
that these men cannot resist it. 

Prof. S. G. Noble. 



Y. M. C. A. 



We are indeed glad to note the 
increase in the interest an 1 at 
tending of the Y. M. C. A. *■» 
vices. The leaders have 



encourage and to support as this 
association. 

Dr. J. E. Walmlev- 



Our Athletic Policy. 



Since we are not permitted to 
have inter-collegiate games, it be- 
hooves us, for the present, j to 
make the best of our inter-class 
games. We have proved in past 
that the athletic spirit which ; 
thrives in rivalry is easily kept 
from stagnation by our inter- 
class contests. So far as those 
games are concerned, there should 
be no flagging of interest as a re- 



putting more time amt thought 
the propositon of their subjec^ 
We hope the future leaders 
follow their example. Eve 
service offered excellent opport 
nity as the highest ideal of ma 
hood. Here the leader in the s 
lection and preparation of th(^ 
subject should have Christ arj 
His relation to young men coil 
stantly in mind . 



conference. We must never let 
it be said that things are dead at 
Millsaps because we do not have 
inter-collegiate games . 

Besides, we are getting much 
good from these games among 
ourselves. If, as many think, the 
chief pnd of collefire athletics is 



Not only should each man 
strive to hold up Christ in his 
religious activity but he should 
hold up in his daily life. The 
truth is we can’t hold up Christ 
any higher than the plane of our 
daily lives. If in our daily lives 
we are living in the dark in the* 
impure atmosphere of the barn- 
yard. We cannot hope on Sun- 
day night to hold Him up in the 
Dure atmosphere of the stars. 






THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



(Continued from Page 1). 

Athletics. 



to himself. H e is one of the 
most popular men in college, and 



C1 «« Histor- We are too prone to magnify the I This is partially true but oonaid- 
r “ d *"*■* - — P« «.■ par, r„i 



orator ’05; commencement debat 
er ’09; chairman Y. M. C. A. 



A delegate tx w natn „ o I By requirin ? an athlete to av- door sports wher e intercollegiate 

A. delegate to Ruston ; Secretary erag e a certain fair grade before games are barred, or are not in 

DeeiaWr e -n7. ry q A ^ 18 qual,fied to i ,la -V on a team, prospect, and you will invariably 



a recognized leader. Sophomore man Declaimer ’07 JV 7 " ^ ^ t0 play 

orator ’05: commeneenve^ D ! daimer °' ; Sophomore the eagerness to hold 



position 



orator ’08 : right tackle on Fresh 

a »»*** an dUUlLK 

reception committee; class editor f ° h ° tba t + 6am \ eU half , stimulus to study. Besides, 

Bobashela ’08- '09: ’Varsity base T* T? ' that * a 

ball ’Og.wwLn no ' . “ d Ca fT ° ^ footbal l ■ difference in a stuomfs grades. 

team 08: Sophomore baseball 



or gain his find the ratio of those benefitting 



ball ’08; basket ball ’08; tile. 

Club ’07- ’08; right tackle on 

Soph, team ’06; right end on Jun- team aT Ruston" 
lor team ’08 ; Kappa Sigma ; Sen- 

ior. 

With Luther Xeill at tackle you 
can always know that there is 
something doing in that vicinity. 

“Luke” is twenty-one years old, 

6 feet tall and weighs 165 pounds. 

He is a very active, powerful 



will be an additional by these healthy sports much 
I smaller. 

Observation has demonstrated 
that the rivalry incident to in- 

, ns . ^ . . . , r . . . . tkink are too quick to ^t- ! tercollegiate games infects a hem- 

team at U Rnstnn aC ~ ° n * ISSI * S1PP ‘ £ ^ ^ ^ “ * U Ph ’ VSiCal d ^- 

letics. and it never seems to come opment in a college; the gvm- 

to us that some boys in a college 1 nasium is thrown open and at- 



intercollegiate Athletics from the are ju^ naturally 7 * T “ thr °r ° pe ” and at ‘ 

Viewnoint of an Alumnus a,u '.. , 7 T te ” de . d . : . the traek teams start »P> 



Viewpoint of an Alumnus. 

C. A. Alexander. 



Ask some presidents of both and field day sports are revived— 
kmds of institutions; you will the whole atmosphere becomes 



Gentle reader, are you opposed 
to intercollegiate athletics? Do 



find that it will maintain univer 
sally an average ratio. 



more or less permiated. The feats 
of others the cheers of their 



player, and is of the aggressive you possess the prerogative of a , Ur . ^ ono1 '^ 
kind. He alwavs mans tn (mt vote and a. vnieo wlnnii nmiia ^ the time 



kind. He always manages to get 
in more tackles than any of his 



vote and a voice which could go 
„ to its very vitals at our Alma Ma- 

team-mates. . While his original ter? If you do. then you want to ^ la ^ P ar Ges fieque 
position is at center will consider all ohasec .->f tlu c_ to llim that never saw a 

more gentlemanly crowd of stu 



What about the temptations? mates, the congratulations of 
Our honored President told me. professors and the admiration of 



e did have ath- the ladies urges other students on 



position is at center. h e will show consider all phases of the ques- 
up equally as well if not better lion unbiased. I shall endeavor 



, , ^ ^mVAATAJUS UI1 

letics and were away from home to hard training for the position 
that parties frequently remarked in prospect. In a student’s mind 



at tackle. Ilis playing at Ruston to present the views of one alum- 
was spectacular. Business Man- nus. 



dents than Millsaps’. We have 



lh e large part of the incentive to 
hard work on a debate is the 
mental picture of being carried 



ager Purple and White; Bible 
study leader; Secj-evarv G. L. 



Seven years at Millsaps College 
as a student, with one of these 



the right men in authority, and off the rostrum a winner. The 
the proper influences. Respected same principal is applicable here. 



instructors always accompany the 

S. ; steward at cottages; center years to remember as the time P anis ° n their three or four trips, tion and rivalry are the life of 
on Soph, team ’07 ; center on Jun- we could “play with our neigh- and dle kn ' s au ’ subjected to trade. Just as certainly, in the 



In the business world competi- 
tion and rivalry are the life of 



ior team 08; Y. M. C. A. dele- bors’ boys;” a lapse of six years 
gate to Ruston ; Center on Missis- with one year spent at a Univer- 



close physical regulation and college athletic world comneti- 

U , ... 1 ni. • i T - 



sippi team at Ruston ; Mid-session sity which advocates intereolle- 



, strict hours by their coach. In 
stead of presenting temptations. 



debater ’09; Pi Kappa Alpha: 
Junior. 



tion and rivalry are the life of 
physical development. Let it be 



giate games, and never having 
been a member of any kind of out- 



In “Red” Adams we have a door college athletic team; one 



. - l It UL 

i am convinced healthy athletics known emphatically and finally 
stimulate pure thoughts and that Millsaps College has no hope 



deeds. 



for intercollegiate athletics, and 



, - ~ v. — -c - *>'***— > v “'- /i . nvoj auu 

powerful, aggressive center, and year as manager of the Millsaps . an we onestly -.intend that there will in the future be turned 

flanked by two such guards as gymnasium, and at present be- ' ntereo lb’g'ate athletics detract out men only two-thirds equipped 

Wasson and Welch, thev form an ing chairman of the nhvsical de- 10m reP £* 0US interest? Our col- for life’s work. 



Wasson and Welch, they form an 
impenetrable trio, 
nineteen years old, over 



ing chairman of the physical de 
Red” is partment of a city Young Men’s 
6 feet 



tall and tips the beam at 185 with a present resolution to fair 
pounds. He seems tireless, gets 



ove rthe field rapldiy, and has a 
keen eye for the ball. In addi- speak to you. 
tion to this, he is an accurate 
passer and feeds the ball well to 
his backs either for kicks or runs 



par l in cut ujl a. city xoung men s ma ini :a ined primarily to The great international Young 

Christian Association; together tram f utur e Methodist ministers. Men’s Christian Association, in 

1 i. * • anc l provide a good Christian ed- considering all-around develop- 

ucation at a minimum cost. Will ment for men. has adopted as its 
intercollegiate athletics deflect motto : 



ly treat the Sjubject, should in 
some measure qualify one to 



“SPIRIT. MIND,’ 



this aim? I hav e in mind a de- BODY.” The neglect of any one 
nominational college where the of these retards dovelopmentmore 



vm.V, I'M. LIUU Ui. UUC- 

and the captain of the baseball third because of their close rela- 
team and the best all-around ath- tion. A developec* uody with a 



To plunge into our subject : » vii/pmcui U1UIU 

What are our objections to inter- rna ' la ^ tr °f lhe football team, than in the proportion of one- 

collegiate track meets, basket ball. 

Center on Prep, team ’06; center base ball and foot «iall? Prin- 

on Fresh, team ’07 ; center on Soh. cipallv these: Some ot the letes ar e theological students. 

team ’08 ; Sophomore. games, and, especially foot ball. * ^ a 

In Haley, Campbell; J. B. and are too rough, and, as a conse- *'P e ’ and tt* e y a re the most highly developed mind with weak 
C. L. Kirkland we have four quence, men are injured more or P°P u ^ ar students in college, and body and low spiritual develop- 

men who are not only football less seriously. It takes a stu- ^ le mos t influence with their ments results in a crank; and so 

but dent’s mind off of his studies, and tinuouoly at his desk does not on, we see that an ideal devel- 

low grades result, it subjects a ^ wa Js nrnke the best grades, nor opment depends upon a propor- 

_ _ ! is his the nurest mindpd nm. ic vinnat., x 



lack of spirituality and mental 
there are others of the same mor- development residts in a brute; a 



players of marked ability, 
who are A No. 1 college men. 



" v/ avuuii, . . i X "I'vu a, pupui- 

They could be substituted on the boys to temptations when away ls ls ^ 10 P uresl minded, nor is tionate development along these 
’Yarsity without weakening the from college. It absorbs a man’s | U fitting himself to sway and three lines. There nn o-rarwtei- 

n, r , ; .. Six i . . i . x x ^ : , 1 — onmxnn + 1 , .... Tx ..- A — influence 



team in the least, and in consider- serious thoughts. It encourages 



men. 



■nay and three lines. There no grander 



ation of their work last fall they betting. Only a few students of 
have been made sub ’Yarsity men. 

Haley weighs 158 pounds, 6 feet games, 
tall and eighteen years old . Full 
back on Fresh, team ’06; half- 
back on Soph, team ’08; Kappa 
Sigma; Sophomore. 



w T ork of God than a beautifully 



* ** 

x — There as no doubt, bets placed d pv? loped physical man, with eyes 
a college can participate in the on the outcome of every intercol- 1 shining with intellectuality and 
Doesn’t that cover the class games or anything stands w ^h a soul reflecting its Maker; 
ground fairlv? 



Considering the whole country. 
J we do read in the papers occa- 
sionallv. of some one being in- 



o v 7 

legiate game, but can we say that there is 110 mor e pitiful sight than 
immune to the bet? The wagers a hodv. neglected and debauched. 



are placed by the natural gam- a<,: expense of its mind. The 

bier — I have seen a few bets physical man has strength to be- 



placed on these occasions and I eome the most cultured, and the 



J. B. Kirkland weighs 165 jured in a game. But does it uu meat- uccasiuus ami i x*xvou umuicu, auu me 

to you that m the United have never seen this varied. The cultured man becomes the most 

i 1.1 _ _ a * a . i Vi/iTT -I** X, „n _ i cninti + ifin n+V.1 



pounds, is 5 feet, ten inches tall occur — 1UV 

and twenty years old. Class States where there are estimated boy in college who is always 

president ’08- ’09; ’Varsity basket three thousand games of football, ready to bet it witr rain, or that ,, v „.,„ 

ball ’08; quarter-back and man- to say nothing of the other sports, black is white, comes around with ^ speak from my own and others’ 



scientific athlete. 

Intercollegiate athletics, (and 



ager Prep, team ’08; sub Fresh- annually, with sixty-six thousand a “fiiver” to place on the game, experience), fosters and stimu- 
man. men and boys playing at least He’s the college bluff — the bully l a tes a love and pleasant recollec- 

T n 3 • • X — lxxxlxx 1 -£• -fi nml HIta 4-U ^ ^ ’ „ 1 tlVln fnT* rmi» rvl /J HTni 



man. 

L. C. Kirkland is eighteen one whole game, and forty-five 
years old, weighs 185 pounds and thousand individuals actually par- 
is six feet tall. ’Varsity basket ticipating in the games and prac- 



ball ’08; manager class basket ties, we hear of only a dozen se- „„„ 

ball ’08; full back on Prep, team rions accidents, and these come lv shows him off. 

-lx m 1 1 1 £ 1x1 * ~ 1„ O rpv /loll liOT-Inr, xxTTax. 



’08 sub Freshman. 

Campbell is nineteen years old. ...... 

veighs 165 pounds, and is 6 feet ing on Thanksgiving Day alone 

n n r r m in«r i . i li i* ii . i j 



largely from public schools? There call having ever seen a bet placed 
are as many men killed out hunt- on any college game, ’(and I have 



■and, like the poor, he is always f° r yonr old Alma Mater as 
with us. whether we have inter- nothing else will. Quadratic 
collegiate games or not ; the ath- 1 equasions, the Greek verb, the 
letics do not create him — it mere- formula for sugar are forgotten, 
I cannot re- ! the “great games” stand as 



iveigirs xou pouuus, auu is u xeei mg ou l iiaiiasgiviug uav diuue. seen very few), by any one whom 
all. Secretary L. L. S. ’07; but shall we for that reason stop I did not personally know to be. 
“x:- :« t. t. o >09; Assistant hunting? The average boy has in college slang, a “sport.” 
Bobashela got to have a certain amountof “But ” mms nn? -snvro “ 



■ritic in L. L. S. 
Business Manager 



07- ’08; Business Manager Boba- roughness — it has been thus since 

‘fiVHtnr the world began — it’s his nature, jto 



a constant and pleasant reminder 
of college days — you Tove the old 
school more because you remem- 
ber it better — and, mind you. you 
have had the mental and spiritu- 

Only a al training just the same; and. I 

handful of students can take part. | sa y. you cherish your college by 
the exclusion of the others, (these pleasant rivalries that dot 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



your monotonous career of six 
years — you do not cherish her 
alone by the recollection of the 
hard “grind” under the little 
“green lamp shade. This fact 
may be decryed by some, but it 
is nevertheless a fact. 

Besides, the college gets an in- 
calculable amount of advertising. 
As little as we might at first 
think, boys have a great deal to 
do with the college they shall at- 
tend. Their Maker has endowed 
them with a fondness for sports; 
they read the newspapers of the 
college games and become famil- 
iar with the institutions and want 
to go where they can get the ben- 
efit of these sports; they do go, 
and are satisfied — it’s their 
choice. Again, athletics among 
the college helps greatly to bring 
all classes of boys together and 
discourage clannishness: it makes 
him alert, vigorous, healthy and 
a thorough partisan for his Alma 
Mater in after life, and he looks 
forward to returning at the pleas- 
ant intervals of the matches and 
cheer his college on . 

If you will pardon a person- 
ality, indulgent reader. I am a 
professional man, and I believe in 
going to a specialist when I want 
anything done in his line. If I 
have appendicitis, I consult and 
rely on a man who has studied 
and knows about the appendix; 
if I get my land deeds complicat- 
ed, or am indicted for this article, 
I will consult a lawyer who knows 
whether I have a title or am guil- 
ty. If I wanted to do the best 
thing for a college I would leave 
the matter with those whose life 
work is running a college and 
training men. Tatre a list of all 
the colleges in the United States; 
pick those with the most promi- 
nent educators in charge and we 
find they almost universally en- 
dorse intercollegiate games. Let 
us ask the professors, the trustees 
and president of Millsaps College 
what THEY think of intercolle- 
giate athletics for oar school. If 
they do not endorse it, I for one. 
shall agree with them and be sat- 
isfied with their verdict. 



Mr. F. S. Williams, a student 
volunteer, led thes ervices Snn- 
day night. His subject was. 
“Why We Should Volunteer to 
go to the Foreign Field.” He 
first showed us how relentless was 
God’s call to service . How that 
God does not give a man up, but 
keeps pressing the cause upon 
him, a3 in the case of Jonah, when 
he ran away from the call of God, 
the Lord followed him and caused 
him to come back and do what he 
was bidden to do. He showed us 
how dangerous it was to resist the 
call of God. As he spoke, we 
were impressed with the fact that 
Jesus was a missionary, and that 
he laid down his life for us, and 
that he bid his followers to go in- 
to all the world and tell of him. 
and how that the only way the 
Savior had for spreading his gos- 
pel was for those who knew him 
to carry his message to others . 

Next he laid before us the ur- 
gent call from the foreign field. 
! . 



nia and help us.” He gave us 
several striking illustrations 
which showed that we ought not 
to wait for an individual call but 
that we ought to place ourselves 
in an attitude for God to use us 
if He wants us. He asked this 
question,, that if we saw a child 
drowning in a river, would we 
wait for the father 01 the child to 
come down and give us a special 
command to go after it, or would 
we go immediately. Or if the 
President were to call for volun- 
teers, would we sit down and say 
we would not go unless the Pres- 
ident himself came and gave us a 
personal call. Then he said that 
the great general call, “Go ye in- 
to all the world and preach the 
gospel to every creature,” had 
been given, and that it was the 
duty of every one, who could and 
was able, to go. 

The attendance Sunday night 
was usually good. We were glad 
to see so many out . vV e feel that 
the talk did a great deal of good. 
Mr. Williams is a promising 
young man and we are sure the 
Lord has a great work for him to 
do. 

The following members of the 
College Glee Club have organized 
themselves into a Y. M. C. A. 
“Quintette,” and will sing at tre 
Y. M. C. A. Meeting every Sun- 
day night: A. C. Anderson, 

Robt. Wright, J. !5. Buck, F. S. 
Williams and J. M. Gwin. These 
young men sang for us last Sun- 
day night, and it added a great 
deal of interest to the meeting. 



To Prof. H. T. Moore. 

To you well taught in wisdom’s 
school, 

My head in l-everent awe. 

Though oft in class I played the 
fool, 

Well schooled in aught but folly’ 8 
law. 

To you, if ere my life shall hold, 
Aught worthy of the world’s es- 
teem will be due, 

Will be the due. for thy hand 
rolled, 

The clay of life that formed the 
dream . 

A new society has recently been 
organized by the young ladies of 
the college. The purpose of this 
club is to bring all of the girls 
together in a common interest so 
that they may work for the pleas- 
ure and good of all. Meetings are 
to be held on Wednesday of each 
week, and a committee on pro- 
grams will arrange the entertain- 
ment for each meeting. The fol- 
lowing officers have been elected 
and duly invested with power: 
President, Miss Clingan; vice- 
president. Mis3 Ricketts ; secre- 
tary, Miss Saums; treasurer. Miss 
Graves . 



WHEN DOWN TOWN 
Drop in at 
Your Old Friend’s Fountain, for 
BOTH HOT and COLD DRINKS 
J. S. MANGUM, 

At Hunter & McGee’s. 

E. H. GALLOWAY, M. D. 
Century Building. 



LOCALS. 



Good morning! Have you 
busted? 

History a sop? Somebody falsi- 
fied. 

A horse, a horse. My kingdom 
for a horse ! 

If wishes were horses, preachers 
would ride. 

Mr. H. H. Breeland, represent- 
ing the Current Literature 
Scholarship Fund, was on the 
campus for a few days last week. 

The Law of Gravitation has had 
a marked effect on the Physics 
grades. 

Neither the societies or the Y. 
M. C. A. will meet tonight. 

Mr. James R. Bright. ’07, a 
prominent young minister of the 
North Mississippi Conference, was 
a campus visitor this week. 

T. A. Stennis, Esq., announces 
that the French Club will meet at 
some future date, possibly at 
11:591-2 o’clock Saturday night, 
for the purpose of having their 
pictures made. 

Rev. Dr. Broom of the Sea- 
coast, is again domiciled at Brooks 
Cottage. 

All the Mission Class leaders 
are requested to meet at ?rof. 
Ervin’s home Saturday afifrnoon 
at 6:30. 



Hederman Bros. 
Book and Job 

PRIMING 

We Make a Spec- 
ialty of Book 
Printing. 

IF YOU ARE IN NEED OF ANY- 
THING IN THE PRINTING 
LINE SEE US BEFORE GET- 
TING IT PRINTED. 

Hederman Bros. 

PHONE 1025. 

Cor. Pearl and Congress Streets 



THIS DOES NOT AP- 
PLY TO OLD AGE 

Most people under forty years of 
age do not wear glasses to improve vis- 
J ion, but to get relief from pain and suf- 
fering in one form or ano’ber, brought 
on by ceaseless struggle of the compli- 
cated muscular system of the eyes. The 
brain demands clear images and the 
nerves and muscles under the whiplash 
of this demand overcome errors in the 
formation of the eyeballs (Errors of re- 
fraction), by an intensa muscular action 
which we term eyestrain 
The object of the lenses then is to cor- 
rect the error by adding to or taking 
from the refractive system of the eye- 
ball, thus doing the work in front of the 
eye and thereby permitting the eye to 
see with its nerves and muscles at the 
rest. 

Every case is a law unto itself, and 
the practjcioner must have a thorough 
knowledge of this intricate visual ap- 
paratus in order to meet and overcome 
the various and varied optical phenorn- 
ina. 

E. R. v. SEUTTER, 

Dr. of Optics, Dr. of Opthalmology 
250 E. Capitol St., Upstairs. 
Jackson, Miss. 



go to 

JACKSON MERCANTILE 
COMPANY. 

for Fancy Groceries and all kinds 
of Feed Stuffs. Same quality at) 
lower prices. . Prompt deliverty is 
our motto. 

G. W. SISTRUNK 

Handles all Kinds of 

Good things to eat. 

Goods always fresh and prices 
reasonable. 

Nice line of Stationery on hand 

Give him a trial 

I HAVE ON HAND 

A number of last year’s Annuals 
and would like to dispose of them. 
Call and see me. 

A. B. CAMPBELL, 

At K. A. House. 

Telephone 8 — 

Majestic Restaurant. 

Modern — up-to-date 

Solicits your patronage 



When clothes are soiled 
Have them boiled 

GfeTEmy 
Ring Izzy 

Jackson Steam Laundry. 

PHONE 730 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Jackson, Miss. 

Millsaps College offers courses leading 
to two degrees: B. A & B. S. 

For Catalogue, address 

W. B. MURRAH,.Pres. 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 

College Photographer. 

Jackson, 

Miss. 

Capitol St., near Bridge. 



Found. 

A fountain pen. Owner can 
receive same by proving the 
property and paying all the charg- 
! es of this advertisement. 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



QUAE FIANT, EX HOC COGNOSCES. 



Volume I. 



Jackson, Mississippi, February 5, 1909. 



Number 5. 



ATHLETICS. 




N a five-inning farce I 
masquerading un- 
der the name of 
i mm base ball, the Foun- 
ders Halil boys silenced the I 
Cooper House nine to the 
tune of nine to three. The ! 
weather was entirely too cold for 
baseball, and the game was re- 
plete with errors. Some of the 
antigs of the players wonld have 
f been more in place in a circus 
; than on a baseball diamond, and 
yet some of the playing was very , 
[ creditable. For the Cooper 
House. Robinson at short played 
the best game . He made several 
pretty stops but was rather weak 
in throwing. Both pitchers were 
wild, and the catchers could hard- 
ly have been worse. The teams 
lined up as follows: 

Cooper House. 

Rickets, p; Peeples, c: Russum. 
lb: Blount, 3b; Jones. 2b; Hand, 
cf; Carson, rf; Campbell, If; Rob- 
inson, ss. 

Founders Hall. 

Thoms, S3 ; Ryols p ; Rankin. 3b : 
Collin3. 2b ; Converse, sf ; Davies, 
lb ; McCoy, e ; Stennis,- rf ; Graves. 

If. 

Umpire — L. B. Jones. 

The Junior class had a meeting 
Tuesday afternoon, and elected 
E. C. Brewer basket ball man- 
ager, and A. B. Campbell base 
ball manager. It is to be hoped 
that the other classes who have 
not already elected their man- 
agers will follow the example of 
the Juniors and proceed at once 
to their election. We have been 
having some ideal base ball weath- 
er recently, and now that exams 
are over we should get the teams 
organized at once and pictures 
*h Vth Annual before Feb. 



TENNIS. 

What has become of our tennis 
players this year? There, are 
ib out fifteen men in the club, and 
ret they seem to have lost inter- 
est in the game. In an interview 
tvith Prof. Moore, the president 
-I the tennis club, he said to a 
reporter for this paper: “I in- 

tend to arrange for a tournament 
between the classes. Let each 
dass have a tennis team and play 
aut a regular schedule for the 
mile go championship.” 

Sit up and take notice, ye ten- 
nis enthusiasts. Here is an op- 
portunity for yon to win fame 
-or yourself and your class, 
[tome out. and begin practice at 
mce. We want to have “ some- 
thing doing” in athletics all the 
time between now and commence 
nent. and show Conference that 
because we can’t ge? the whole 
eiece of pie, we will not sulk in 
tmr tents and take none. Be- 
sides we are going to have in- 



ter-collegiate athletics “next 
year,” and we want to be prepar- , 
ed . 

Attention Co-Eds! 

Since the second term began 
several new co-eds have been ad- 
ded to our list, and it seems to us 
that with their increased numbers 
they would be able to start some- 
thing in the line of athleties. We 
have three tennis courts that are 
rarely ever in use, and the gym- 
nasium is open to them three aft- 
ernoons every week. . If sug- 
gestions are in order, allow us to 
suggest that two managers of ath- 
letics be selected from the ranks 
cf the co-eds, and that the girls 
then be divided in two sections 
equal as nearly as possible ac- 
cording to numbers and athletic 
ability, and then pick a team irom 
each division. It would also be 
well to have a name for each team 
such as the “Purples” and 
“Whites.” This would eliminate 
the class games, but if conducted 
properly a great deal of enthu- 
siasm should be aroused. The 
prospects for a very exciting 
contest last year were good until 1 
one team accused the other of 
“excessive pulling of hair and 
use of finger nails. ” Careful 
steps should be taken this year 
to avoid such serious catastrophes. 

Baseball Captain. 

There is a college base ball 
manager to be elected at the next 
meeting of athletic association . In 
selecting this man we should have 
in mind a man who understands 
base ball thoroughly, and who can 
organize and manage organiza- 
tions. The position of baseball i 
manager has never been filled as 
it should have been. The man- 
ager has heretofore been a mers ! 
figure-head . As we understand 
it. he should have charge of base- 
balls. mits, bases, bats and all 
base ball parephanalia belonging 
to the athletic association. He J 
should look after the making out 
of a schedule, should be on hand 
at all games to see that none but 
members of the athletic asso- 
ciation participate. He should 
also decide all questions arising 
while the schedule is being play- 
ed. Above all things, he should 
be a live, red-hot energetic and 
yet conservative college man. 

Why not have a track team this 
•spring? 

Millsaps will be represented on 
the two leading college baseball 
teams in Mississippi this spring. 



Y. M. C. A, 




To avail yourself ofTm, im- 
mense spiritual advantages which 

this study brings you. 

To bring yourself into a fuller 
ETE committee of the sympathy with your Lord’s pur- 
Missionary Depart- pose to save men — the world.' 
ment of the Y. M. To strengthen your faith by 



C. A., at its last 
meeting appointed Messrs. J. A. 
Alford, R. M. Brown, R. J. 
Bingham, A. B. Campbell, C. 
E. Cain, R. H. Ruff. D. R. 
Wagson. F. S .Williams. J. 
D. Wrotan, leaders -of. classes 
to be organized in the study 
of “Effective Workers in 
Xeedy Fields. ” These men have 
the books on hand and will call 
on all the boys soon . 



giving you a new sense of His 
saving power. 

To bring you into a proper re- 
lation to missionaries and their 
work . 

To give you an interest in all 
men as your brothers. 

To make you a citizen of the 
world and intelligent about world 
affairs. 

To create a love for mission- 
ary reading. 



We were glad to nave with us 
The question will likely sug- on Sunday night Mrs. Ballington 
gest itself to you. Why should I Booth, who had come down to 
study missions?” The answer is visit thevRankin State farm . Mrs . 
that you have much to gain from Booth is president of the “Prison 
such a study. Mission study has . League. ” The object of the 
a claim on every earnest and am- B ea g Ue j s to visit the prisons of 
.itious student. A few reasons the country in the endeavor to 



may be briefly stated in reference 

to you as a student. 

A consideration of the problem 
of non-Christian countries brings 



help the convicts to higher ideals 
and to assist them in overcoming 
the depressing influence of the 
world, on leaving prison. It has 
established homes in different 
you a breadth of outlook. In- par t s 0 f the country for the ben- 
stead of thinking in the small of paroled convicts. Through 
sphere of the college or even nla- these homes several tnousand men 
tional life, one can think in con- have passed and been helped, 
tinents having taken a look into she talked we were led to 



the inner life of the hidden na- 
tions. It will add greatly to 
your practical equipment of your 
life career. 

It bears more or less directly 
on many other branches of study. 
Whether economist, historian, 
lawyer, physician or educator, 
the knowledge of the people, 



feel as she said we ertight to feel, 
more in sympathy with the con- 
vict; that he is not a brute driv- 
en about by the whip, but that 
beneath that grim, repelling coun- 
tenance there is that which is akin 
to God — a soul. She said to learn 
what manner of man he had been> 
but that we should think ho*w 
Christ could transform and 
their customs, habits, works, laws, | br j„ bten life, and that we 
their follies in the application of ou „ bt to speak sotne word or do 
science, and their Intellectual life sompt hing that would enable 
means much in the preparation Chl q st to get control of his life, 
for your life work. g bp beg g pd xis to act kindly to- 

ward the prrsoners and to remem- 
It embraces events and facts bpr that wben we get 1ip yon der. 

that I. if I be a thorough student - t win bp sa ; d of , ls << T wa3 in 

must know. If it is important prison and yp visited me> ” or “I 
that you should know the general was j n pr j S o n a nd ye visited me 
course of the Hundred Years’ not » she urged us. also, not to 
War. or the Seven Years’ War und< , reat j m ate the power of God. 
for Independence or liberty, of for j ust as He was able to c i efU ise 
how much greater importance is fhp ]pppr hpal the blind or raise 

it that you should know of the ^ dpad j ugt s0 He able to 

Nineteen Hundred Years’ of War c]eanse the beart of the hardest 
of Christ in the world the war CT j m i na ] and pvd a new spirit in 
for liberty, enlightenment truth, 



peace 

love? 



and unselfish brotherly 



What has become of our Gym- 
nasium? Let’s get busy, fellows, 
and stick by our director. We 
can have a field day in the spring 
that will reflect credit oh us. 
We have a good director, and by 
spending a little money can have 
our Gym . well equipped . 



Undoubtedly, Mrs . Booth 
is doing a great work by show- 
ing kindness and lending aid to 
men. just at the time when the 
world is pointing the finger of 
scorn at them and refusing to 
shelter them . 

Owing to the fact that it was 
not generally known that Mrs. 
Christ is vour Booth would be he»v, tnere were 



These four summed in one To 

Be a Thorough Sudent. 

Then, as a Christian, there are 
other reasons: 

Because Jesus 

Lord and I must know about the not as many boys out as should 

progress of your Master’s King- have been, though the hall was 

dom. nearly full. We wish to express 

our appreciation to the ladies for 

To equip yourself to lead in the coming out to hear Mrs. Booth. 

missionarv activities of the and we feel sure that she appre- 
* 

church. ciated it also. 







THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



The Purple and White port your publications, both by 
— - = ; contributing material for publica- 

Published Weekly by the Junior tion and in a financial way, 
Class of Millsaps College which is just as important. Be 

loyal to your class, strive to make 



BOBT. H. RUFF .... Editor-In-Chief. .. ,, 

»• •• a* 50 ® 1 *'® Editor, it the best class m college. 

A. B. CAMPBELL ... Athletic Editor. & 



men who had sought their couch- Herculean efforts, he \ succeeded 
es after a night of weary work. [ in knocking off a couple of 
Prep. Welch was one of the first j planks, thus intimidating the 
to discover the akful conflagra- ( flames. He announced in bold, 
tion, and after circling the main palpable language that his de- 



If building for five consecutive times tective instinct told him that the 



£Tw M a A s R S ^ BET SAUM y m S c c *a Editor' i ^ ou ean at all, try to make and touching all four corners of fire wa3 of incendiary- orrgin and 



m°l N neill '. ; ; ' B^ines Ed M*r ^ c0 ^ e £ e Glee Club an oppor- the campus in geometrical pro- that he would have the quaking 

a. f. kelly .... Assistant Bu». Merr. tnnl+-»r whioL gression, then proceeded to town malefactor before Dr. Murrah in 



All matter for publication should be ad- 
dressed to the Editor-In-Chief. 

All business communications should be a 1- 
dressed to the Business Mgr., M. L. Neil . 



Application made for entry as second-class Contests that are Open to VOU 
mail matter at the Postofflce at F jvu. 

Jackson. Miss. 



Single Copy Per Annum 50 Cents 
Two Copies Per Annum 75 Cents 



EDITORIAL. 



RETROSPECTION. 

We have just passed through a 



time that has tried our souls. 
But there is nothing that helps to 
bring a man to the realization of 
what he has been doing more than 
examinations. One of the great- 
est temptations that confronts a 
college man is that of careless- 
ness and indifference to his work, 
and it i3 necessary that he check 
himself up occasionally. 

We do not think that it would 
be amiss at the present time, just 
as we are entering upon our sec- 
ond term, to call attention to some 
of the duties and responsibilities 



Assistant Bus. Mgr. tunity which is to be envied . 

Speak in every contest that you to extend an invitation to the fire ■ less than twelve hours, 
have a chance. If you are a department to meet with us. We hang our heads in shame 

fail to avail yourself of the two However Aunt Jones had seen , to think that we are harboring 

the fire fully thirty minutes be- a character so vile that would 
It would be trite to show the 1 fore it originated, and was ready perform such a magnanimous 
average student the value of de- on the scene with seven beautiful, deed as this. If there is such a 
veloping his physical nature, for separate and distinct reasons why one here, he must immediately 
every intelligent man knows the the building burned. But the [ sever his connection from this in- 
great value of college athletics, j two great heroes of the night were J stitution of learning. His pres- 
The mental and moral man de- those two gallant knights, Ralph ence is not desired and we will 
pends to a great extent upon the : Sharborough and Ralph Apple- positively not tolerate any such 
physical man. A person with a white. [ acts of decency, 

strong physique is far more able The last named gentleman did There were several other the- 
to withstand the mental and the peripatetic, perambulating , ories advanced by the surging 

moral strain which is wrecking so dressing stunt between the shacks , throng, among which are the fol- 

many of our brilliant men. and the fire. When he drove up lowing: 

But the intellectual and phys- ' he dashed into the midst of the First. That is was caused by 

ical must not be developed at the flames with all the intrepidity of the reaction of Jeff. Davis’ speech 
expense of the moral. And in a Wellington. Ralph Sharbor- in the Senate, 
college it is necessary for a man ough. the hero from the land of Second . That it was the work 
to take a stand for good or bad, the sunset, and of horned toad of night riders, (there ueing sev- 
and if he goes through college fame, did stunts which surpassed eral bales of hay in the barn, 
without taking a stand for the that of the hero of the same name. Thereby that it was “Glubity 
Christian life, the odds are great- He dashed upon the roof of Dr. I Slub,” the Chinese god who ap- 
ly against his ever doing so. For Sullivan’s barn before forty gars poared at the chapel, seeking ven- 
this purpose, the Young Men ’s could have skinned a minnow, and geanee ; and fourthly and lastly. 
Christian Association was insti- 1 in a well-worded harangue, de- an d most probable, that the in- 
tuted. Join it, and make your- fied the flames to advance. cendiary was domiciled in the 

self a part of it. You must have Dr. James MagrucTer Sullivan dormitory. 

something to tie to. or else you was the next character to appear. As your paper is gotten out in 



that fall upon us. . . 

A<i A a wlU drlft through your whole and with pleading and burning el- the interest of suffering humanity. 

college aereer. oquence exhorted the by-standers you are urged to make a thor- 

If we have not had this idea of to pay close attention and help ough investigation and report to 

college life, let us make some rad- him save his homo and fireside, the Law and Order League. 

ical changes. We are here amid Never did a general on any bat- There were many distingushed 

exceptionally good opportunities tlefield acquit himself with more men on the scene, from all parts 

and as sensible men we can not \ courage or valor than he, like the of the known campus. The fire 

afford to trifle with them. Take immortal Caesar leading his tenth department graciously responded 

. part in all of the various activi - 1 legion to victory, he was every- , after the fire had been extinguish- 

The primary purpose of being tieg that gQ to make a strong) where at the same tIme . He was ed. 

in co ege is to stu y, t is s ou c v j r jj e man. Strive to be a lead- cool, brave and daring and could We think on a whole, that the 



invoice of his stock at least once 
a year, so would it not be wise 
for us, as live college men. to 
make an inventory to see whether 
we are richer or poorer in knowl- 
edge and character by our being 
here. 



be placed over and above all. This 



has a three-fold value, the knowl- 



er. Be faithful to every duty. | have told you the properties of fire was a howling success, even 



and do the work placed upon you the rare compound H 2 0 at any < Morris Storm sajd mat in many 



edge learned from the text books, ... ., , , „ , » ., 

_ . with the best of your ability, stage of the game. 



the ability to study and the train- howeyer smaU it may bg 



respects it outrivaled the bril- 



ing of our minds to do clear, con- 
cise thinking. Although of great 



R. J. Mullins, hearing the in- liancy of the fire of Moscow at 



If you have macre row grades, 1 spiring words of his beloved which he was an interesting spec- 

and are dissatisfied with your 1 friend and teacher, at whose feet tator. 

importance, a stu ent s ou uot work , check your account and see he had sat in Geologv,( making A collection was started to er- 
consider this all of his college , „ ,, ., . A .... . - . . 

■ . whose tault it is. uet in the twelve on examination in the ect a marble slab on the snot 

work. A man developed in the , . .. | , , i .. / 

, habit of doing good, systematic same), was seen by your corres- commemorating tne hero ^ho.-z, 

c ass room a. t e expense o is work Cut ou ^ skows an( j 0 th er pondent to jump flat-footed a ten- mopping brilliancy caused him 

other iHCultiGs is 3 , crsiik . . . . * 

. . . things that attract vour time and foot fence in order to stand by the originate such a bold schem 

A student o be well rounaea attent j on f r0 m your work, or side of the intrepid leader and The crowd adjourned sine dV 
and equipjie , must take part in y 0U w ju s00n awa k e to the teacher. and the announcement of any lik 

all phases o co ego 1 e. e rea jj za ^.j on ^hat y 0ur college ca- R. M. Brown, seeing how the event will appear in the Collegian,. 



reason that college men are be- 1 
coming such a force in the world 
today is due to the fact that they ! 
are all round men . While in i 
college, you have an opportunity 
to develop every faculty of your , 
being. 

To do this, you cannot afford 
to neglect the literary society 



reer is a failure. Determine to land lay amd realizing that he which is guaranteed never to be 



do your best during the remain- 
der of the year. 



had to have a pass in Junior more than three months ahead of 
Physics grabbed six buckets of itself, 
water and was on the roof in less 



Awful Conflagration. 



(Special to the Purpie and White) 



time than it took Dr. Kern to 
bust the Junior English class. 
Dr. M. W. Swartz appeared as 



Phi Delta. 



January 28. the official representative of the 



The Phi Delta entertained a 
number of their friends in a 



work. We have never heard an 



Your correspondent was a wak- faculty. He ruled Dr. Sullivan 1 smoker given in their new hall. 



ened this morning at 1:30 by the out because he was trying to play on last Tuesday night. The oc- 
alumnus say that he regretted aw f u j C ry of fire, which was waft- a double role, that of fire chief casion was one of much pleasure 
the time he devoted to this work, e( j across the campus on the and president of the faculty when and enjoyment to all who attend- 
but invariably he tells you that ka | my m i dni ght air. After a something. happens : Dr. Swartz, ed. 

he regretted not having taken a thorough search the fire was reminded the crowd that the fire This is the first public enter- 
more active part. To be a potent f oun( j to be in the vicinity of Dr. was very' much like the one in tainment given by the Phi Deltas, 
factor in your trade or -vocation j ames Mngruder Sullivan’s, and which Nero played the first fid- though they have been in exist- 
vou must be able to express your j a t er developed that it was the die. and the only objection he saw ence for soma time. They have 
ideas clearly, and to be able to x) 0r mitory barn, which was situ- to the present fire was that the some strong men among their 
think quickly and rapidly' on your ate( j - n tbe middle of the campus heat could not be stored away number, and we predict for them 
^ ee ^- and thought by many not to be a until cold weather comes and the [ a bright future. 

To fully appreciate your col- joy forever. flames converted into matches. j 

lege, you must have a live college Howsomever and notwithstand- Dr. Ackland. ^official umpire The Kappa Alpha boys enjoy- 
spirit, and to have this you must j n g this, the aforesaid alarm was and referee, came running up and ed a rare treat in the way of a 

• 1 — A *— * all Vnnt mnlwiiTn/wrlnl in rJ I oV n rr a -inof a.-* -fVi n m i r*li f vr mn nf flamoc rlinn^r frivon Viv Afr* T P Tl nAollv 



PURPLE AND WHITE 



lovely home on West Capitol 
street was thrown open and at 
6 o’clock the entire chapter was 
present to partake of its hospi- 
tality. The dining room was 
richly decorated in crimson and 
gold, the colors so dear to the 
heart of every Kappa Alpha. 
The elegant dinner was served in 
seven courses, during wmch many 
toasts were exchanged. Evdry 
one present reports a happy ev- 
ening and all consider Mr. Enochs 
a gracious host. 

The Millsaps Jewels will enter- 
tain their friends this evening at 
the home of Miss Bsesie Huddles- 
ton. 

Miss Will Anderson has been 
visiting relatives in Jackson for 
the past two weeks. Her stay has 
been one of ( great pleasure, for 
during this time she has attended 
many festive occasions in Jack- 
son’s social circles. Miss Ander- ' 
son has won many friends in the 
Capital City and has made her- 
self a social favorite here as well 
a3 in her home town . She has a 
number of friends on the campus 
who hope that she will visit her 
“Dear Old School” before re- 
turning to her home in Water 
Valley. 



LOCALS. 



The 

over. 



ordeal is past. They’re 



Belhaven gave a recital 
night. Who got stung? 



last 



A. C. Jones says he passed all 
his classes with (four)ce. 

Dr. W. B. Murrah preached 
twice at Vicksburg last Sunday. 



On the night of Jan. 29th Dr. 
Sullivan’s buggy was mysterious- 
ly stolen. The local representa- 
tive of Pinkerton Detective Bu- 
reau. of New York City, Mr. T. 
L. Bailey, of Mathiston, Webste^ 
county, Mississippi, is on the trail 
of the criminal. In the next issue 
we shall hope to have unraveled 
the mystery surrounding it, and 
brought the criminals to justice. 



Annual on the safe 
Rubicon ! 



side of tne 



The Down-and-Out Brigade. 



Puzzle picture: Find the man 
who passed in Junior Chemistry. 

Rev. Gann Williams. ’04, vis- 
ited his club mates and the cam- 
pus last week. 



Have your pictures made, and 
all your work in for the Annual 
by February 15th . 



We hope the faculty are satis- 
fied with the results. The stu- 
dents are not. 

0 

“In this abbess was a brother! 



Oh, speak a word of comfort to 
the Down-and-Out Brigade — 
j The men who ’ve done their best 
and yet the goal they’ve never 
made ; 

The fellows who must toil each 
day with nothing much in view 
And though the world is wreath- 
ed in smiles, their lot is only 
rue. 

Oh. lend a hand for helping to the 
Down-and-Out brigade — 

The men who’ve lost but not be- 
cause they ever seemed afraid : 
We don’t know all the causes 
that may drag a fellow low 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Mr. Boyd Campbel will talk 
on Clean Athletics Friday night 
in the Y. M. C. A. Hall*. 

Both societies will meet in their 
halls tonight at eignt o’clock. 

Prof. Erwin will meet the mis- 
sion leaders at his home, Monday 
evening at 6 :30. 

The Jewels will give their en- 
tertainment at Prof. Huddles- 
ton’s tonight. 

I 

All class histories and poems 
must be handed in to Mr. Apple- 
white before the 12th of Febru- 
ary. 

E. L. Marley will conduct the 
Y. M. C. A. Sunday night. His 
subject is God’s Call to Men. 
Don’t fail to come. 



minstrel,” etc. -Jr. English ex- And maybe; if the truth were told 



This evening at Professor Hud- 
dleston’s. the Millsaps Jewels will 
entertain at a Five Social from 
five minutes to seven till five min- 
utes after eleven o’clock. The 
Jewes are too well known to neea 
any introduction to the college 
world, but some unique features 
are promised at tonight’s enter- 
tainment. Various games have 
been provided for the amuse- 
ment of guests, and friends of the 
society, among others Miss Key, 
Miss Robertson and the college 
Glee Club have agreed to aid in 
a musical program. 

Five cents admission will be 
charged, and refreshments will be 
served by the young ladies, the 
proceeds to be devoted, as is gen- 
erally known, to the local chari- 
table work of the society. Ev- 
erybody is cordially invited . 



am. paper. 

We regret that Dr. Sullivan has 
been confined to his room for sev- 
eral days of this week. 

After much ado and prepara- 
tion the French Club has at last 
had its picture made. 

Mr. R. M. Brown was initi- 
ated into the Kappa Sigma fra- 
ternity several nights ago. 

The Glee Club has gone to 
Yazoo City to give an entertain- 
ment at the opera house. 

We are glad to welcome into 
our midst Misses Alice Brown and 
Eram Griffin, two new co-eds. 

Dr. Swartz is having a “house 
raising.” Someone suggested 
that he wanted to get as near 
heaven as possible. 



they didn’t stand a show. 

Oh, try to put new courage in the 
Down-and-out brigade — 



We call attention to the adver- 
tisement of Mr. A. L. Chambers 
in this issue. Besides being fast 
and accurate with the typewriter, 
he is an expert linotype opera- 
tor, having charge of the linoy- 



The men who’ve wept above the type machine in Hederman Bros.’ 



grave where all their dreams 
were laid: 

Who’ve walked the ways of sad- 
ness and of heartaches and of 
pain. 

And soon will sleep beneath the 
stars upon life’s battle plain! 

—Ex. 



office, which enables him to do 
better work than the ordinary 
stenographer. Mr. Chambers 
makes special rates to the college 
boys. Don’t fail to see him when 
you have speeches or anything 
you want to have typewritten. 



A Duty. 

The Purple and White was bom 
with a mission to fulfill. That 
mission is to study the college 
needs and to suggest in a modest, 
yet bold manner, the best reme- 
dies that our thought and love 
can produce. You will pardon 



GLEE CLUB. 

The greatest musical treat of 
the season will be offered at Mill- 
sape College Tuesday evening. 
February 16th, when the Millsaps 
Glee Club gives its annual spring 
concert. Those who were so for- 
tunate as to hear the concert last 
fall will remember wwh pleasure' 



to 



A Freshman’s Plea. 

Oh speak a word of comfort 
the busted Freshman class, 

The ones who’ve always done 
their best, of whom so few hav e 
passed . 

We do not know the reasons that 
have pulled us down so low, 
But, maybe, if the truth were 
known, we haven’t had a show. 

Oh give some jacks and ponies 
to the busted Freshman class, 
And, maybe, on the next exams, 
a few of us will pass . 

We have failed in Geometry; in 
Solid and in Plane, 

And if you’ll give these jacks to 
us. we’ll never fail again. 

Oh try to put new courage in the 
busted Freshman class, 

And tell ns not to weep, for the 
horrible time has passed. 

And make us feel that we have 
not been at all neglected, 

For where there’s such a little. j 
but little is expected. 

—A. M. C. 



A new book has just been pub- 
lished, entitled “Wild Criminals 
I Have Initiated.” by Hon. 
Frank Starr Williams. Price 10c. 

Posters are up all over town 
for Max Figman m “The Substi- 
tute, ”^o be at the Century Sat- 
urday, Feb. 6. Prices 25c to 
$1.50. 

“Bist” Terrell and Brian 
Campbell went home during ex- 
amination. Also Mr. Mayfield. 
Likewise Messrs. Blount and Joe 
Carson . 

Dr. Walmsley in Economics: 
“What is a genius?” 

McCarty: “A genius is a man 
who knows all about other peo- 
ple’s business, but knows noth- 
ing about his own. ” 



ns, therefore, for again reverting i the sweet music rendered by the 
to a phase of the Bobashela work, members of the club on that oc- 
As you well know, it takes mon- casion. Since then, by reason of 
ey to keep the wheel going. So hard practice, every man on the 
we wish to urge upon the stu- club has improved very much in- 
dents not only the necessity for deed. 



subscribing for the Bobashela, but 
also the necessity for looking 
after the pictures and the settle- 
ment for space The fifteenth 
day of February i3 the date by 
which all this must be arranged. 
So let the class treasurers get 
busy and adjust this matter, for 
the publishing house will not 
move one peg until they hear the 
“pinks” of the corn. 

You can thereby greatly assist 
Campbell and his assistants by 
giving this your immediate at- 
tention . 

Neglect will only cause delay 
and unnecessary trouble. Surely 
no man would do this, for in all 
our experience with college af- 



Th.5 Bonp «rv> "11 n-r'W and 

are composed by men who have 
; made the writing of glee club 
music a specialty and this of 
course is positive assurance that 
every song contains its share of 
the laughs, which are a great part 
of a Glee Club performance. 

College Glee Clubs are being 
imitated on the stage today more 
than ever before, and it is for the 
simple reason that they are be- 
coming more and more popular, 
and those theatrical organiza- 
tions featuring them are certain 
of a good patronage; and yet, 
after hearing one of these so-call- 
ed glee clubs, there is a feeling on 
the part of the hearer of disap- 



fairs. we have never known a pointment, for the club seems to 
more earnest and conscientious lack something. And it does 
worker than he. It was largely lack something. It lacks the true 



A Good Motto: 

Early to bed, 

Early to rise. 
Subscribe for this paper, 
And advertise. 



due to his energy that last year’s 
Bobashela did as well as it did. 
He is interested in his work, full 
of love for Millsaps and capable 
to a marked degree. Give him a 
chance, and he will anchor the 



college spirit, which a real col- 
lege glee club shows — the spirit 
that makes a college man willing 
to give all he has to make the 
name of his college more famous. 
Than too, your professional glee 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



club artist is paid to sing, while 
the college glee club man sings 
because he enjoys it, and feels 
like singing. This is especially 
true of every man who sings on 
the Mi lisa ps Glee Club. Every 
man is bubbling over -with col- 
lege spirit, and when he stands 
before an audience he 3ings with 
one thought uppermost in his 
mind: “I must do my best for 

the honor of old Millsaps!” And 
he does his best with the result 
that the audience hears songs that 
come from the heart, and after 
hearing the songs, they realize 
that nothing is lacking in the true 
College Glee Club. 

For these reasons, then, every 
college man, and erery lover of 
true music, should do all in his 
power to promote the interests of 
the Colllege Glee Club, and the 
best way to do this is to be pres- 
ent at the concert on the above 
mentioned date. 



Before It Is Too Late. 

• 

If you’ve a gray-haired mother 
In the old home far away. 

Sit down and write the letter 
You put off from day to day ; 
Don’t wait until her tired steps 
Reach heaven’s pearly gate. 

But show her that you think of 
her 

F fore it is too late. 

If ou ’ve a tender message 
Or a loving word to say, 

Don ’t wait till you forget it. 

But whisper it today. 

Who knows what bitter memories 
May haunt you if you wait ? 

So make your loved ones happy 
Before it is too late. 

We live but in the present, 

The future is unknown; 
Tomorrow is a mystery. 

Today is all our own. 

The chance that fortune leads us 
to 

May vanish while we wait; 

So spend vour life’s rich pleasure 
Before it is too late. 

The tender word unspoken, 

The letter never sent, 

Tfle long TDTgoiirT -mcssugt.n. j 

The wealth of love unspent — 
For these some hearts are break- 
ing 

For these some loved ones wait; 

So show them that you care for 
them 

Before it is too late. 

t 

Leave the Shadows Behind. 

If you would like to increase 
your happiness and prolong your 
life, forget your neighbor’s faults. 
Forget all the slander you have 
heard. Forget the temptations. 
Forget the fault-finding, and give 
little thought to the cause which 
provoked it. Forget th'e pecu- 
liarities of your friends and only 
remember the good points which 
make you fond of them. Forget 
all personal quarrels or histories 
you may have heard by accident, 
and which, if repeated, would 
seem a thousand times worse 
than thev are. Obliterate every- 



sweet memory’s sake, only those 
things which are lovely and lova- 
ble. Thus you will make life bet- 
ter worth living. — Household. 



Cigarettes. 

The London Lancet states that 
the most deleterious product in 
the combustion of tobacco is car- 
bon monoxide, which is the dead- 
ly constituent of water, gases and 
is present in comparatively large 
quantities in tobacco smoke. This 
is the poison that is responsible 
for the utter demoralization of 
that unhappy individual who has 
come to be known as the cigar- 
ette fiend, whose pale face, shat- 
tered nerves and liopeless posi- 
tion in the community is recog- 
nized as applying to many of our 
American youth, wliose oppor- 
tunity for usefulness and happi- 
ness has passed away. 

The pipe or cigar smoke draws 
the smoke into his mouth and ex- 
1 pels it. with the result that the 
j minimum of the products of com- 
bustion — namely, nicotine, the vol- 
atile oils, and the deadly carbon 
monoxide (CO) gets into circula- 
tion. The cigarette smoker, how- 
ever, takes a deep inhalation of 
the smoke, which at once reaches 
the upper air passages of the 
lungs, where almost immediately 
are released into his circulation 
these products, causing ths slight 
dizziness and the mild urged to 
take it. You can refuse bread 
and butter, meat and potatoes, 
and even coffee without a word 
of remonstrance, but never wine. 
— San Antonio Express. 



BAKED HASH. 

Mix together 1 cupful of chop- 
ped meat, 2 cupsful of boiled rice, 
2 cupsful of stewed tomatoes and 
half a cupful of bread crumbs. 
Season with salt and pepper and 
bake for half an hour. 



DON’T FAIL TO ATTEND THE 
GLEE CLUB CONCERT 
In the College Chapel on 
FRIDAY NIGHT, FEB. 16th. 

Subscribe 

FOR 

THE 

PURPLE 

AND 

WHITE 



Single subscription 50c per year. 
Additional Copies, per annum, 25c 



A curious tree without a leaf 
I grows in one of the Islands of the 
Pacific. It grows to nearly thir- 
J ty feet, with branches spread- 
ing like a huge umbrella, yet it 
is completely leafless. Its sap is 
useless as a medicine, but as fuel 
' the wood is worse than useless, 
being as hard as iron and quite 
as difficult to burn. 



An eniment English scientist 
has just advanced the theory that 
blushing is an aehievemtn of 
which every one should be proud. 
He says it requires brains to 
blush. Idiots cannot blush ; neith- 
er can animals. He calls atten- 
tion to the fact that infants do 
not blush, although they learn to 
at* an early age, just as soon, in 
fact, as the brain begins to exer- 
cise its functions. No individual 
blushes of his own free will. Nei- 
ther for its coming nor its going 
is there any exercise of will. It 
is controlled, he says, solely by 
the brain, and is a positive sign 
that there is an active brain 
there. 

TYPEWRITING 

Neatly and Accurately Executed. 

SPECIAL RATES to STUDENTS 

A. L. CHAMBERS, 

Care Hederman Bros. 

Residence ’Phone 1208. 

Jackson, :::::: Miss. 



E. H. GALLOWAY, M. D. 
Century Building. 
Jackson, Miss. 



Hederman Bros. 
Book and Job 

PRIMING 

We 3Iake a Spec- 
ialty of Book 
Printing. 

IF YOU ARE IN NEED OF ANY- 
THING IN THE PRINTING 
LINE SEE US BEFORE GET 
TING IT PRINTED. 

Hederman Bros. 

PHONE 1025. 

Cor. Pearl and Congress Streets 



THIS DOES NOT AP- 
PLY TO OLD AGE 

Most people under forty years of 
age do not wear gla-ses to improve vis- 
ion. but to get relief from pain and suf- 
i fering in one form or ano her, brought 
on by ceaseless struggle of the compli- 
j cated muscular system of the eyes. The 
brain demands clear images and the 
nerves and muscles under the whiplash 
of this demand overcome errors in the 
formation of the eyeballs (Errors of re- 
fraction), by an intense muscular action 
which we term eyestrain 
The object of the lenses then is to cor- 
rect the error by adding to or taking 
from the refractive system of the eye- 
ball, thus doing the work in front of the 
eye and thereby permitting the eye to 
-ee with its nerves and muscles at the 
rest. 

Every case is a law unto itself, and 
the praeticioner must have a thorough 
knowledge of this intricate visual ap- 
paratus in order to meet and overcome 
the various and varied optical phenom- 
ena. 

E. R. v. SEUTTER, 

Dr. of Optics, Dr. of Opthalmology 
250 E. Capitol St., Upstairs. 
Jackson, Miss. 



go to 

JACKSON MERCANTILE 
COMPANY. 

for Fancy Groceries and all kinds 
of Feed Stuffs. Same quality at 
lower prices. . Prompt deliverty is 
our motto. 

G. W. SISTRUNK 

Handles all Kinds of 

Good things to eat. 

Goods always fresh and prices 
reasonable . 

/ 

Nice line of Stationery on hand 

Give him a trial 



I HAVE ON HAND 

A number of last year’s Annuals 
and would like to dispose of them. 
Call and see me. 

A. B. CAMPBELL, 

At K. A. House. 

Telephone 8 — 

Majestic Restaurant. 

Modern — up-to-date ' 

Solicits your patronage 



When clothes are soiled 
r ‘ Hstve them boiled 

Get Bizzy 
Ring Izzy 

Jackson Steam Laundry. 

PHONE 730 
MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Jackson, Miss. 

Millsaps College offers courses leaaing 
to two aegrees: B. A & B. S. 

For Catalogue, address 

W. B. MURK \H,. Pres. 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 
College Photographer. 

Jackson, 

Miss. 

Capitol St., near Bridge. 



WHEN DOWN TOWN 

Drop in at 

Your Old Friend’s Fountain, for 
BOTH HOT and COLD DRINKS 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



Volume I. 



ATHLETICS. 

FOR EVERY MAN. 

In writing this article it is not 
our purpose to make the plea for 
inter-collegiate athletics our main 
theme, although we believe that, 
if the advice here given was to 
ha acted upon by tha students 
of Millsaps, inter-collegiate ath- 
letics would follow as a matter 
of course. Our purpose in writ- 
ing this article, however, is to 
appeal to every student in this 
college to make the most of the 
advantages we have here at Mill- 
saps, and we believe that this is 
necessary before we can hope for 
inter-collegiate games. 

Some years ago the people in 
a certain community in North 
Georgia, were stirred up by a 
fanatic who made them believe 
that the world was soon to come 
to an end. The result was that 
everybody went about neglecting 
their business, and shouting with 
joy at the thought of the great 
day soon to come. Finally, 
however, the old Methodist 
preacher whose worn for the time 
being forgotten, came upon a 
crowd of these people, and com- 
manding their attention for a 
moment, he said: “Brethren, I 

think it’s time for you to quit 
singing ‘I want to i?e an angel,’ 
and say. ‘With God’s help, I’m 
going to be a man.’ ” 

The effect of this speech com- 
ing from this good old man was 
magical. The people seemed to 
realize how neglectful they had 
been, and discovered that sever- 
al poor, sick people, whom it was 
their duty to assist, had died, an a 
so they returned to the leadership 
of the good old Methodist preach- 
er. And we should strive to be 
men above all else; for if we 
would have to be like Christ, he 
being the example of manhood, 
and to be men, we must be strong 
physically. Can we picture a 
perfect man who is a weakling. 
No, a man may be learned, and 
he may be good, but the world is 
^sappointed in him as a man 
unless he is strong physically. 

We are living in an age today 
*-*>an men are needed; men who 



QUAE FIANT, EX HOC COGNOSCES. 



Jackson, Mississippi, February 11, 1909. 



Number 6. 



have not only intellect, but who 
have a physique equal to a stren- 
uous life. As far as intellect is 
concerned, the average college 
man is endowed with a sufficient 
quantity; but many men have 
failed, and are failing today, not 
irom a lack of intellect, but from 
lack of physical strength. Their 
bright minds are handicapped by 
weak bodies. 

The great Y. M. C. A., which 
is today one of the greatest in- 
fluences in the world for good 
realizes the need of strong men. 
and wherever the Y. M. C. A. 
is found, there will be found a 
gymnasium, as a part of its nec- 
essary esuipment; and many men 
have joined the Y. M. C. A. for 
the benefits of the gymnasium, 
and through association with the 
Christian men found there, they 
have been led to Christ. 

Every fellow in this college is, 
we are sum anxious to be a true 
man, and for true manhood there 
are three requisites which we 
shall name here : First, is a desire 
to be like Christ, the perfect man 
Second, a strong mind, capable 
of grasping truth, and of con- 
ceiving lofty principles. And 
third, a strong body, capable of 
carrying us through the hard- 
ships incident to life, and able to 
back up our high principles. 

We have every advantage to 
learn of Christ, on the campus, 
and at the many churches in our 
city. We have every opportu- 
nity to develop our minds, our 
teachers being men of wisdom, 
and high principles. And fel- 
lows, we have the opportunity 
here to develop our bodies. We 
have an athletic field that is go- 
ing to be one of the best in the 
South; but to make it thus, we 
must unite our efforts, and use 
it . Every man should make use 
cf the track, and all who can, 
should use the field for baseball, 
and other games. 

Then, we have a gymnasium 
which, although we admit that it 
is a poor one, is worth your while . 
A few dollars is all that is needed 
to purchase the small amount of 
paraphenalia needed' to make it 
almost complete, and if some of 



our fellows would make use of 
what we have, there would be 
Hewer stoop-dhoiildered men on 
the campus. 

So let’s get busy! We should 
all take some part m everything 
pertaining to true manliness, and 
excepting Christianity, a good 
physique is as important a re- 
quisite as any other. So, work 
hard with what we have, and in 
time, we will have a good gymna- 
sium, with baths and everything 
else needful. Let’s get busy! 

Let’s be men in every sense of 
the word, and we will be success- 
ful in life, where others have fail- 
ed. 

J. S. D. (23). 



GLEE CLUB COURT. 

Two of the finest vocalists in 
Jackson will be heard at the Glee 
Club Concert Tuesday night, 
February 16. 

Mrs. James B. Cooper and 
Miss Reilly have consented to 
sing on that occasion, and this 
means much to those Who have 
heard these ladies sing. Mrs. 
Cooper has been in our city so 
long, and is so well known that 
it is hardly necessary to comment 
on the rich quality of her voice; 
and she has a most delightful 
stage presence, which adds great- 
ly to the charm of her magnificent 
voice. 

Miss Rielly has only been in 
Jackson a short time, but she 
has endeared herself in the hearts 
of the music-loving people of 
Jackson, to such an extent that 
her every appearance is hailei 
with delight. She comes from 
Tennessee and has a personality 
that is rarely found, except in 
Tennessee’s fair daughters. She 
sing 3 with that expression which 
is peculiar to true singers; and 
she sings songs that are pecu- 
liarly adapted to her exquisite 
voice. 

The Glee Club will present sev- 
eral new members, which are not 
on the program, and Messrs. 
Duke, Moore and Jumper will 
present the funniest sketch ever 
seen in Jackson. It is entitled, 
“April Fools ” and is a laugh 



from start to finish . 

There are also several other 
special features being arranged 
for, and the Club promises the 
greatest concert ever heard in 
Millsaps Chapel. Come and bring 
her. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Nothwithstanding the fact that 
there were several attractions, 
along the line of socials and 
shows, in town Friday night, a 
good number of the boys were out 
to hear Mr. A. B. Campbell’s 
lecture on athletics. First, he 
told us of the great interst taken 
in athletics at the Ruston Con- 
ference and how athletics was 
coming to be a real factor in the 
Young Men’s Chrisitna Associa- 
tion, how it brings men into closer 
fellowship and develops them in- 
to better all-round men. He then 
dwelt at some length on the phase 
of clean athletics. It means 
much to have such a man as 
Campbell, who is a leader in ath- 
letics, to take a bold stand for 
clean athletics, and hold it up 
before the student body as the 
only proper and honorable stan- 
dard to follow. 

At the close of the service 
three men, Messrs. A. R. Peeples, 
H. B. McClure and E. H. Moun- 
ger, were received. We are 
proud to have these men join our 
ranks, and hope that they will 
make useful members. 

The records show that only 
about fifty per cent of the boys 
in college are Association men. 
This is much too small a per 
centage. We cannot hope to get 
every man, but we ought to have 
at least three-fourths of them. 
Let U3 not depend too much upon 
the membership committee to se- 
cure men. buet lot each member 
use his influence in bringing these 
men into the Association. 

And now a word to the non- 
members who are asking why 
they should be long to the As- 
sociation : 

You should belong because it 
is the only religious organizati"" 
of the college, and as such, LC * 

(Continued on -cut 



The Purple and White 

Published Weekly by the Junior 
Class of Millsaps College 



BOBT. H. RUFF .... Editor-In-Chief. 

L. BARRETT JONES . . Associate Editor. 

A. B. CAMPBELL .... Athletic Editor. 
MIS8 MARGARET SAUMS . Social Editor. 
D. R. WASSON .... Y. M. C. A. Editor. 
JOHN GASS Local Editor. 

M. L. NEILL Business Mgr. 

A. F. KELLY .... Assistant Bus. Mgr. 



All matter for publication should be ad- 
dressed to the Editor-in-Chief. 

All business communications should be ad- 
dressed to the Business Mgr., M. L. Neill. 

Application made for entrj as second-class 
mail matter at the Postofflce at 
Jackson, Miss. 

Single Copy Per Annum 50 Cents 
Two Copies Per Annum 75 Cents 

EDITORIAL 

BAILEY WINNER. 

On last Wednesday the faculty 
selected Mr. Thomas L. Bailey 
to represent Millsaps in the Mis- 
sissippi Inter-Collegiate Oratori- 
cal Contest. This is the highest 
and most important honor that 
the college can offer. The fact 
that we have lost for the last four 
years caused the faculty to be 
more careful in the selection of 
the representative for this time. 

Bailey i3 in his Senior year, hav- 
ing entered the Freshman Class in 
1905. He was born in Webster 
county and prepared for college 
in the Eupora High School. He 
has forged his way to the front 
— always standing in the foremost 
ranks in all phases of college life . 

As a speaker and writer his 
record is exceptionally good. H* 
has held every office in his lit- 
erary society, besides having rep- 
resented it in both the mid-ses- 
sion and commencement debates. 
In his Sophomore year, he was a 
contestant for the Oscar Kearney 
Andrew’s medal and won the 
Collegian Short-story prize. He 
was the representative to the 
Whitworth Chautauqua last year, 
and has been identified with all 
the older college publications, 
having been local editor of the 
Collegian, and at present editor- 
in-ehief of the Bobashela. This 
year his literary society, in rec- 
ognition of his earnest and merit- 
ed work, bestowed her greatest 
honor, the office of Anniveraarian. 

As an athlete, he has made 
good, having played with the 
present Freshman team. At the 
close of the season, he was select- 
ed as ’Varsity tackle. 

As a member of the Young 
foil’s Christian Association, h'e 
- held several official positions, 



and was twice a delegate to Rus- 
ton. 

With Tom Bailey as our repre- 
sentative, we are going to win! 
He is a forcible speaker and high- 
ly capable of writing a manuscript 
that will take the first rank. 

| He i3 well liked and popidar 
among the boys, for to him, a 
man is a man, be he Senior or 
Prep. 

| We are all pleased with the se- 
lection, so let’s stay by him and 
keep him by our encouragement, 
to win back the glory that is our , 



j “Bill” Murrah, ’08, played 
right tackle on the Vanderbilt 
scrubs this year. He is singing 
base on the Glee Club. 

Rev. Paid B. Kern of Nash- 
, ville, who conducted our revival 
service in 1905,- ’06 will hold a 
similar series of meetings during : 
the coming spring at both the A. 
& M. and the University. 

The “Five Social” given by, 
l the “Millsaps Jewels” last Fri-j 
day evening was a marked sue- , 
cess. The number present came 
I fully up to the expectations of . 
the members and the evening was 
one of great pleasure for every j 
one . Special selections rendered j 
by the “Glee Club” and several 
solos by Mr. Duke, our matchless 
tenor. Delicious refreshments 
were sold by the young ladies of 
the society, this giving each one 
present an opportunity to h^lp 
them in their missionary work. 
The “Jewety’ are gratified by 
the success of their latest effort 
and greatly appreciate the man- 
ner in which the Millsaps boys 
always respond to their call. 

The new club organized by the 
co-eds has developed into a lit- 
erary society known as the Min- 
nehaha. Some one has suggested 
that the name would be more ap- 
propriate if Spelled “Many ha 
ha!” but the young ladies are in 
earnest and intend to make the 
organization a success. 

“Brother Goat” has again been 
at work on ehe campus. Satnr- 
: day night, Feb. 6th, was the reg- 
i ular initiating time for all of the 
fraternities,, and as a result sev- 
eral of our Freshmen have passed 
' through the mill. Messrs. Car- 
son. Bnck, Robinson, Blount and 
, Ramsey are now wearing the Kap- 



pa Alpha badge.. The Kappa Sig- 
mas have claimed Messrs. Hunt- 
ley, Thoms, Thompson, Rainey. 
Ryals, Green and Morrison, while 
Messrs. Dorman, Wright, Carlisl e 
and E. Jones have been initiated 
into the ranks of the Pi Kappa 
Alpha . 

Oh Wednesday Miss Adele 
Knowles was the guest of honor 
at the meeting of the Minnehahas. 
She spent the entire day on the 
campus with her friends and for- 
mer school mates. Miss Knowles 
is the same jolly girl who was so 
recently in our midst, and we are 
always glad to have her with ns. 

Dr. Murrah will talk on Re- 
serve Force in the Y. M. C. A. 
Hall Sunday night. Don’t fail 
to come. 

The Work of “Old BUI.” 

And when the day of Pentecost 
was fully come they were all with 
one accord in one place. 

And suddenly there came a 
sound from Heaven, as the rush- 
ing of a mighty wind, and it fill- 
ed all the houses where they were 
sitting. 

And there appeared unto them 
cloven tongues, like as a fire, and 
and it sat upon each of them. 

And they were filled with the 
Holy Ghost and began to speak 
with other tongues as the spirit 
gave them utterance. 

And they were all amazed and 
were in doubt, saying one to an- 
other, what meaneth this? 

Others mocking said, these 
men are full of new wine. 

Then they gladly received the 
Word and were baptized, and on 
the same day there was added 
unto them about twenty-one souls. 
And fear came into every soul. 

This is the scriptural version 
of what happened in the several 
fraternity halls Saturday night. 

Three days of long and horri- 
ble suspense reigned in the land. 

Each day brought forth more 
fear and dread of the mysterious 
initiation. Finally the night ar- 
rived and the “William Goat 
was brought forth from his dark 
and secret hiding place. Then 
there was joy and gladness in the 
hearts of the “.Greek” mCn. But 
it was not thus among the “Rid- 
ers. ” Their countenances depict- 
ed the fear and trembling that 
made the&e few hours miserable 
for them. 



The “Riders” were easily per- 
suaded to perform many remark- 
able and ridiculous “stuns” ig- 
norant of the fact that they were 
furnishing endless- amusement for 
the aforesaid “Greek” men. 
Many of the young gentlemen 
were legally authorized to sell 
newspapers . 

The oratorical skill which they 
displayed in announcing the 
“News” would have done credit 
to a Demosthenes. Some kneel- 
ing with outstretched arms, show- 
ed much ability in mailing love. 
They waxed eloquent with sweet 
words and endearing expressions 
which declared their deep and 
enduring love — for sota pillows. 
Singing “coon” songs and solos 
and (preaching sermons were 
among the many other wonderful 
things of the evening’s program. 
The old negro’s prayer was heard 
many times above the noise and 
tumult: “Lordj if you ain’t 

gwine ter help me, foh Gawd’s 
sake don’t help dat hear.” 

The goats of the different fra- 
ternities were busy until the wee 
small hours of the night. The 
successful riders were as follows: 

Kappa Sigma— C. E. Ryals, 
J. R. Carson, J. S. Buck, J. 
W. Robinson and L. M. Blount. 

Kappa Sigma — C. E. Royals, 
David Thoms, W. W. Huntley, 

Joe Morris, Fulton Thompson, Os- 
car Rainey and E. H. Green. 

Pi Kappa Alpha — Edd Jones, 
R. H. Wright, W. M. Dorman 
and Geo. L. Carlisle. 

Phi Delta— Dan Buffkin, R. D. 
Peets, W. E. Morse, E. R. 
Holmes, C! S. Till and S. S. 
Backstrom . 

These are all promising young 
men and we believe they will be 
a credit to their respective fra- 
ternities. 

E. H. GALLOWAY, M. D. 

Century Building. 

Jackson, Mias. 



G. W. SISTRUNK 

Handles all Kinds of 

Good things to eat. 

Goods always fresh and prunes 
reasonable. 

Nice line of Stationery on han<I 

Give him a trial 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



(Continued from page 1). 
should have) y<fiir earnest sup- 
port. The Association will help 
you to guard and develop your 
own spiritual life. It will give 
you a splendid opportunity for 
doing personal work, and not 
only this, but the special feature 
will give you great pleasure and 
inspiration. By joining it you 
become a member of the greatest 
student’s movement the 

world . 

The Association stands for 
clean, Christian manhood and ag- 
gressive Christian work for and 
by the students. It provides 
opportunity for thorough and sci- 
entific study of the Bible and mis- 
sions . It gives a touch with men 
and an experience in dealing with 
men which is of great value. To 
the non-Christian it offers an ex- 
cellent opportunity for getting 
light on the subject. 

Let me urge every one that is 
not a member to consider the 
question and give in hi3 name at 
once to be presented for mem- 
bership. You can add much to 
the success of the organization; 
and its success means much to 
the college. 

BASEBALL GAME. 

In a ten-inning game Saturday 
afternoon the Founders Hall team- 
defeated a picked team from va- 
rious parts of the campus. The 
game was well-played and inter- 
esting from start to finish. The 
pitchers were especially good. 

Rankin of Founders Hall, was 
at all times master of the situa- 
tion and allowed only two- hits 
during the entire game. Dunlap 
Peeples wa3 in fine form and for 
seven innings did not yield a sin- 
gle hit. He began to weaken in 
the eighth, howevetl. and in the 
last half of the ninth the “Bull- 
necks” garnered enough hits off 
him to tie in the ninth, but he 
was unable to stem the tide. 

For the picked team Morse, 
Spann and Collins played the best 
game. Morse made several pret- 
ty stops at short, while Collins 
and Spann accepted everything 
that came their way, and Collins 
got one of the two hits. The 
prettiest play of the game was 
when Converse ran from deep 
center to left, catching a high fly 
after Ryals had misjudged it. 
•8£antley made the hit that 
brought in the winning run in the 
f'ast half of the tenth inning. The 
,Jfeeams lined up like this: 



Picked Team. Mr. Stennis is one of the most'dignant and said that he was go- 

A.B. H. R. E. popular men in college, and hi3 ing to answer one of the articles 

Spann, cf 5 1 1 popularity will make him the through the New Orleans Chris- 

Holmeq. e 5 2 more efficient for the position, tian Advocate. Now this is not 

Peeples p. & 3rd .. 5 1 1 2 He is a great ball player and is treating us fair. Let’s fight it 

Russum, rf 4 competent to manage any kind of out through the columns of our 

Rickets, 2b 5 2 1 baseball organization $rqm the own paper. We will be only too 

Collins, If 4 1 Millsaps team to the Chicago glad to publish any and all ar- 

Jones, 3b. & P. .. 4 2 Cubs. | tides sent us in regard to athlet- 

Morse, W. E., ss.. 4 2 Dr. Walmsley made a motion ics, in fact it will be doing the 

Morse, J. M. , lb.. 4 1 1 that a committee; »e appointed athletic editor a great favor, to 

to invite Bishop Galloway to de- send him material to fill up space. 

Founders Hall. liver his address on Jefferson We are anxious to know the ob- 

A.B. H. R. E. Davis in our chapel for the bene- jections raised in Conference 

Ryols, If 5 1 1 1 fit of the Athletic Association, against athletics, and we feel sure 

Therrell, lb 5 1 2 Stennis, chairman pro-tem then that members of conference are 

Converse, cf 5 1 appointed Dr.- Walmsley, T. L. perfectly willing to have us pre- 

Williams, 3b 5 1 1 Bailey, A. B. Campbell and R. sent our side to them. In order 

McCoy, c 5 2 H. Ruff on the committee to in- to start the ball rolling, let us 

Thoms, ss 5 1 2 2 terview Bishop Galloway. suggest that those opposed to ath- 

Huntley, 2b 5 2 1 3 Out of appreciation of his faith- letics at Millsaps answer some of 

Stennis, rf 4 1 2 1 ful work and efficient coaching the following questions through 

| Rankin,, p 4 2 on the Prep, footbqll team, the the columns of our paper: 

Preps, donated Pro. S. G. Noble j Why are you opposed to inter- 
I Two-base hits — Stennis, Hunt- a handsome gold watch in chapel collegiate athletics? 

ley. Monday morning. Dr. Kern ^ What is the policy of confer- 

Hits apportioned — Off Rankin, made the presentation speech, enee i n regard to athletics? 

2; off Jones, 1; off Peeples, 7. which brought forth rounds of j How many college men are 

Passed balls — McCoy, 2; applause. Professor Noble was j n conference who attended col- 



Founders Hall. 



Therrell, lb 5 

Converse, cf 5 

Williams, 3b 5 

McCoy, c 5 

Thoms, ss 5 

Huntley, 2b 5 

Stennis, rf 4 

I Rankin,, p 4 



men are 



- • ■ "X' i 

Holmes, 2. quite overcome, but he expressed leges where inter-collegiate games 

Umpire — Davies. his sincere appreciation for the -were allowed? 

Time — 1 :40 . gift in words that came from the ^ How many members of confer- 

heart. The irrepressible Juniors ence ever played football? 

New Tennis Club. then gave fifteen ’rahs each for what per cent of the members 

Kern, Noble and Preps. of conference are college men? 

A new tennis club has recently j How many of hose opposing 

been organized on the campus, Manager Brewer of the Juniors, a thletics know the true condition 
consisting of the following mem- Had his colts out at basket ball 0 f athletics at Millsaps College? 
bers : Smith, Coggin, Ray, Peets, * practice last week, and he says J -^y should conference have 
Beasley, Buffkin and Kirkland. | that they bid fair to become a t he p 0Wer 0 f regulating athlet- 
The games are played on the old very potent factor in the race for j es ? 

courts near the main building, the pennant. J Now gentlemen, please come 

This makes the third tennis club early and avoid the rush, for we 

now in existence on the campus. -^- e no t e with pleasure the wa nt to give you something to 
Why not arrange for a touma- stan( j that the Collegian is tak- think about between now and 
ment between them? ing for inter-collegiate athletics. next December. Then is the time 

Th e editorial in the January is- when a motion permitting inter- 

niT ,„ r At vw:~., sue was strong and well written, collegiate athletics at Millsaps 

and with the permission of the College is going through confer- 

, writer we intend to publish it in ence like greased lightning, but of 
"I uedemtand mat year boy ^ of m .-pa,. con „ e waul to wdcrataud 

osta is a goo ea o an -White” at tome future the question thoroughly before 

,, , ^ date We herewith extend the y 0U vote for it. 

“Yes,” answered Farmer Corn- aaie - . “ J 

.talk, “I’m kind o’ worried Colieg.au a hearty mv.M>o * 

about Josiah. Since I seen him i»“ “ th '\ “e 1 * Notice. 

. . , ,, , , , mate athletics, and when we have 

jumpin’ over parallel bars an i" 1 ’ „ • n 

turning’ sumersaults jes’ for the won ont we Wl1 * le V hG , mit, In order to & et * his matter per ' 

wrrli-li 4-V» « Pnrrtlo RT1.1 W 111 lG _ . i • .. 



Notice. 

In order to get this matter per- 



tuming’ sumersaults jes’ for the In order to get xms luau-ei 

fun of it, I’m downright afraid j°' n t e urp 6 an fectly clear, I beg to bring to 

. ms i s • is . _ s _ in claiming the honors. u-s rmp-stirm of 



mu it, x ill uunuiiguv mj.* # — 

he will work hisself to death when in doming the honors . JO ur attention the question of 

he gets on the farm where thar’a paying for the engravings for the 

practical bizness to ’tend to.” — We are beginning to get re- Bobashela. The price is five dol- 
Ex. ports from the papers we are j a rs per page., and no matter if 

sending out. Several ministers ' there are twenty-five in the pic- 

Baaeball Manager Elected. have said that they were in sym- ^ ture, or only one, the price will 

pathy with our movement. One ^ the same. Now This is very 
The Athletie Association met in has said that he had been entire- reasonable, and is hardly half as 
Dr. Walmsley ’s room Tuesday ly converted to our side by the a s has been charged before 

afternoon and elected Mr. T. A. athletic issue of the Purple and — j n f a ct, it is les3 than we 
Stennis baseball manager for ’09. White. Another became very in- tually pay for making th 



PURPLE AND WHITE 



and the space which it occupies. 
Now. every inch of space must be 
paid for by Feb. 15th, for the 
Annual is coming out on time this 
year, and nothing will be sent 
in until it is paid for. Nor will 
we delay the pictures and wait 
for payment, but will have it out 
entirely. For example: If ten 

men have paid for their picture 
in a football group, and the elev- 
enth refuses to pay, the money 
will be refunded to those who 
have paid, and the picture will 
not appear in the Annual. This 
may seem a little severe, but we 
have been forced to adopt some 
such means, and I feel sure that 
with the exceedingly low prices 
you will find no difficulty in meet- 
ing the payment. Let me urge 
the managers of athletic teams 
and the treasurers of classes to 
find the pro rata share of each 
member and collect it at once. 

Please do not get this confhsed 
with what you paid the photog- 
rapher. He is paid for making 
and grouping the pictures, and 
you are to pay me what it costs 
to ge tthe engravings made from 
the photographer’s, and to have it 
put in a page in the Annual. I 
feel sure that this plan will meet 
with your approval and that you 
will lend all assistance possible I 
in carrying it out. When the 
Annual comes out and you find 
some picture missing, you can at 
once conclude that somebody in 
that picture refused to pay his 
part, and certainly more could 
reflect more discredit. 

Remember, you only have un- 
til Feb. 15th. 

A. B. Campbell. 

Business Manager. 



LOCALS. 



W. C. Leggett has returned to 
school after an absence of several 
weeks. 



The Glee Club left Tuesday aft- 
ernoon for Grenada, Columbus 
and other points in North Missis- 
sippi. They will return Satur- 
day. 



Rev. J. T. MeCafferty, ’01, 
pastor at Moorehead, spent a 
couple of days this week on the 
campus with his club-mates. 



Tom Stennis was erected base- 
ball captain at the meeting of the 
Athletic Association Tuesday. 



Dr. Kerp has been invited to 

deliver his lecture on Irwin Rus- 
« 

sell before the Peripatetic Club at 
Brookhaven. 



Strom and Whitson have enter- 
ed the Current Literature contest. 



Caesar Josephus Swain, rep- 
resenting Stall’s Books, has been 
on the campus visiting Peg Buff- 
kin. 



Dr. Kern umpired the basket 
ball game last Friday at Clinton 
between Mississippi College and 
the A. & M., much to the sorrow 
of the Junior English class. He 
has been invited to umpire an- 
otherother game. 



Dr. Walmsley was unable to 
meet his clashes last Thursday 
and Friday on account of illness. 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 
College Photographer. 

Jackson, 

Miss. 

Capitol St., near Bridge. 



Dr. Murrah will preach at the 
Y. M. C. A. Hall Sunday night. 



It seems that there is such a 
strong friendship between Mrs. 
Cooper and Hendrix Mitchell that 
she is constantly calling him up 
at night over the telephone. 



•i 



WHEN DOWN TOWN 

Drop in at 

Your Old Friend’s Fountain, for 
BOTH HOT and COLD DRINKS 
J. S. MANGUM, 

At Hunter ft McGee’s. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Jackson, Mi^s. 

Millsaps College offers courses leading 
i^o two degrees: B. A & B. S. 

Catalogue, address 

W. B. MURR\H, Pres. 



The Collegian is making great 
strides to greatness. The Ed- 
itor-in-chief has offered a free trip 
to Africa to the person securing 
five thousand subscribers, an au- 
tomobile for twenty-five hundred 
and a Barrios diamond ring for 
one thousand. 



R. P. Mitchell Millsaps, ’04- 
'05, has been elected manager of 
the University footfall teem for 
the coming session. 



Millsaps Glee Club 



COLLEGE CHAPEL 
FRIDAY NIGHT, 



FEB. 1 6 



Mrs. J. B . Cooper and Miss Reiley will sing, and other features 
will be added to the regular program. 



Prof. Moore, with Messrs. Duke and Jumper, will present that 
laughable farce, in one act, 



“April Fools” 



ADMISSION 



50 AND 25c. 



LOOK 



J Boys, Ur. Bitsia, Rsprescatlng ] 



LOOK 



f s 



Caskey Tailoring Co.” 



Will be at the K. A. Chapter House Saturday, February 13th, 
from 9 to 4 o’clock displaying the finest line of Spring Samples 
in the city. It will pay you to call and look over his samples as 
he is making a reduction to Millsaps College Boys. 



TYPEWRITING 



Neatly and Accurately Executed. 



THIS DOES NOT AP- 
PLY TO OLD AGE 



SPECIAL RATES to STUDENTS 



A. L. CHAMBERS, 

Care Hederman Bros. 
Residence ’Phone 1208. 
Jackson, :::::: Miss. 



When clothes are soiled 
Have them boiled 



Get Eizzy 
Ring Izzy 



Jackson Steam Laundry. 



Most people under forty years of 
age do not wear glasses to improve vis- 
ion. but to get relief from pain and suf- 
fering in one form or another, brought 
on by ceaseless struggle of the compli- 
cated muscular system of the eyes. The 
brain demands clear images and the 
nerves and muscles under the whiplash 
of this demand overcome errors in the 
formation of the eyeballs (Errors of re- 
fraction), by an intense muscular action 
which we term eyestrain. 

The object of the lenses then is to cor- 
rect the error by adding to or taking 
from the refractive system of the eye- 
ball, thus doing the work in front of the 
eye and thereby permitting the eye to 
see with its nerves and muscles at the 
rest. 

Every case is a law unto itself, and 
the practicioner must have a thorough 
knowledge of this intricate visual ap- 
paratus in order to meet and overcome 
the various aud varied optical phenom- 
ena. 



PHONE 730 



E. R. v. SEUTTER, 



I HAVE ON HAND 

A number of last year’s Annuals 



I Dr. of Optics, Dr. of Opthalmology 
250 E. Capitol St., Upstairs. 



Jackson, Miss. 



and would like to dispose of them. 
Call and see me. 

A. B. CAMPBELL, 

At K. A. House. 



GO TO- 



JACKSON MERCANTILE 



Telephone 8 — 



Majestic Restaurant. 



Modem — up-to-date 

Solicits your patronage 



COMPANY, 
for Fancy Groceries and all kinds 
of Feed Stuffs. Same quality at 
lower prices. . Prompt deliverty is 
our motto. 



- 






THE PURPLE AND WHITE 





QUAE FIANT, EX HOC COGNOSCES. 




Volume I. 


Jackson, Mississippi, February 19, 1909. 


Number 7. 



ATHLETICS. 

Notwithstanding the very un- 
favorable weather conditions ot 
the past week, athletics has by 
no means been on a standstill. 
The tennis courts have been un- 
der water a considerable portion 
of the time, but the baseball dia- 
mond being on higher ground, 
the teams have been able to work 
out to an advantage and the man- 
agers can tell pretty well the 
personnel of their teams by this 
time. The Juniors and Seniors 
have combined ana should put 
out a very strong team with Ap- 
plewhite to speed ’em over and 
Brooks to do the receiving. The 
most likely candidates for this 
team are Applewhite, Brooks, 
Morse J. M., Neill, Alexander, 
Campbell A. B., Enochs, Kelly, 
Augustus, Welsh, Crisler, Hand 
and Johnson. Manager Peeples 
of the Sophomores says that his 
team is fast rounding into form, 
but that he thinks they need a 
warmer climate in which to train 
and he will very likely take them 
to Florida or California. Those 
who will make the trip are Pee- 
ples, Davis, Galloway, Spann, 
Haley, Ricketts, Cooper, Camp- 
bell B. L ., Till. Buck, Green A. 
A., and Jumper. 



For the information of our 
readers and our good friend, the 
Daily News, we will say in the 
language of John Paul Jones that 
we * ‘ have just begun to fight. ’ ’ j thing which can above all things 
We herewith extend a cordial in 



Y. M. C. A. 



hope to advance. Those of us 
who have had the best interest of 
the college at heart have The devotional services Friday 

hoped, almost prayed, for the one n 'ght wds by Mr Wroten. 

He gave us some very helpful 

give us unity and spirit— inter- thoughts on the subject of temp- 
collegiate athletics.” Pretty good tation. 

Sir Charles. Call again. 

Have you seen the ’varsity men da . v ni e ht Mr - Lucian Smith was 
their new sweaters? They receivt!d into Association. Re- 



At a short business session Fri- 



vitation to the Daily News and 
to any other publication in Missis- 
sippi which believes in ntercolle- 

giate athletics, and which has the | ]n tneir new sweaters? tney I — 

good of Millsaps College at heart 1 wear them upon any and all oc- P orts were heard from the dif- 



to join with us in our fight. The 
question has heretofore been a 
subject of warm discussion; we 
propose to make it a red hot is- 
sue. If a few more newspapers 



casions and are always very par- ^ erent chairmen of committees, 
tieular to arrange their coats so T he devotional comimttee report- 



that the M will be prominent. 
It must be said that our husky 
’varsity men presented a very 



in Mississippi would take the ' striking appearance thus attired, 



stand for us that the Daily News 
has taken we would have no cause 
to doubt the outcome of the ques- 
tion when it is brought up at 
Brookhaven next fall. What we 
want is to get our side of the 
question before the friends and 
patrons of the college, and get 
them and a majority of the mem- 
bers of the conference to see the 
athletic situation here as we do. 
Some time ago the Daily New3 
came out with a very strong edi- 
torial in favor of intercollegiate 
athletics, which editorial we in- 
tend to publish in our columns 
as soon as possible. 



and the picture of the football 
team is nothing short of a ‘‘cut- 
ter. ’ ’ , 

Kittrell. one of our old men, is 
doing some sensational playing 
on the basbet ball team of the 
Physicians and Surgeons at Mem- 
phis, Tenn. He was the partic- 
ular star in a recent game with 
the University of Mississippi, 
which resulted in a score of 29 
to 11 in favor of the Physicians 
and Surgeons. 



It is high time to begin work 
on the organization of our track 
! team. The first step is to elect a 
manager who will take the prop- 
of er amount of interest in the work 



The gifted athletic editor 
Although most of the avenues the Collegian comes at us with and who will devote his time to 
of hope in that direction were ; something like this in the Jan- 'it. Prof. Noble stands inreadi- 
closed last fall when Bishop Mor- uary issue: “For the past two ness to rend any aid possible, and 

rison set his foot down on inter- years Millsaps has lacked one es- is very anxious to see a team 
collegiate athletics, the student sential element— unity. Without here. He has had a great deal 
body of Millsaps College has by unity of the student body she of experience in track work, and 
no means given up the effort to e an never hope to rank among the under his coaching we should 
secure a reconsideration of the greater institutions of the South, have a very creditable team. 

matter and a reversal of the edict where, with her ideals and facul- 

which went out from the Yazoo ty, she deserves to stand. At 
City conference. present this school is one mass 

The Weekly “Purple and of individuals, without a single 
White,” a publication gotten out bond of unity. Each man is for 
by the students, keeps continual- • himself and his only thought is, 
ly hammering on the question in' “ego. mei, mihi — me. me!” There 



an effort to induce the board of 
bishops of the Methodist church, 
under whose auspices the college 
is conducted, is backed up by nu- 
merous arguments in favor of in- 
tercollegiate games . 

It is understood that the facul- 
ty is practically unanimous with 
the boys on the question but they 
are as helpless as the boys them- 
selves. — Jackson Daily News. 



is absolutely nothing in common 
between the Freshman and the 



Owing to the lack of other in- 
door exercise, the Founders Hall 
boys have recently taken to pug- 
ilism. Peg Bufkin, Graves, 
Thomas and Converse are the 
most interested and from all re- 
ports, they will soon be giving 



Battling Nelsofn something to 

Senior, no common cause in which 
they all pull together. College 
spirit indeed! An abundance of 
college spirit can be aroused by 
class games, I am sure! How, 
pray, can any one expect college 
spirit to flow from empty preten- 
tions? Still without this one es- 



We call attention of our readers 
to the editorial of Mr. Fred Sal- 
lens on the subject of “kissing.” 
See the Jackson Daily News for 
the fifteenth beginning. “Now, 



sential commodity, no college can Gwendoline . ” 



ed that all meetings had been pro- 
vided with leaders, and that the 
leaders had been taking more in- 
terest in the preparation of their 
subjects than heretofore and that 
there had been a marked increase 
in the attendance of late. 

The missionary committee re- 
ported that the work was pro- 
gressing nicely, and that the nor- 
mal class was doing some good 
work under the leadership of 
Prof. Erwin. 

Since officers are to be elected 
at the next business meeting, a 
nominating committee was ap- 
pointed. A great aeal depends 
upon the action of this commit- 
tee. For +he success of the As- 
sociation depends largely upon 
the ability of its officers to direct 
the work. We should have the 
best talent in school for officers of 
the Young Men’s Christian Asso- 
ciation, for it is the most import- 
ant organization of the college. 

Tnere was no meeting of the 
Association Sunday night on ac- 
count of bad weather. 

J. A. Alford will lead the Y. 
M. C. A. Friday night. His sub- 
ject, “Christ in Business. ” 



A Card of Thanks. 

We, the undersigned, do most 
sincerely thank the boys of the 
Junior class for the beautiful and 
costly valentine which they so 
kindly sent 113 . We shall al- 
ways keep it in the library as a 
token of love and esteem of our 
class mates. We also wish to 
express our thanks to Mrs. 
Swartz for he r prompt delivery of 
the precious box entrusted to her 
care. 

(Signed) . Junior Co-Eds. 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



Class of Millsaps College 



The Purple and White averages them by rank. The j Campbell is a member of the 

■ - • one ranking highest is awarded Junior Class, and is one of the 

Published Weekly by the Junior the first medal, wnile the next best speakers and all round men 

highest wins the second medal. * in college. 

Should a tie result, as occurred As Athletic Editor of the Pur- 
at Meridian last spring, the Sec- * pie and White, he has made an 

retary proceeds to average the excellent record, making a 

grades in per centage, and as strong and untiring fight for in- 



ROBT. H. RUFF .... Editor-ln-Cblef. 

L. BARRETT JONES . . A*sociate Editor. 

A. B. CAMPBELL .... Athletic Editor. 
MISS MARGARET SACMS .Social Editor. 
D. R. WASSON .... Y. M C. A. Editor. 
JOHN GABS Local Editor. 

M. L. NEILL Business Mjjr. 

A. F. KELLY . . . . Assistant Bus. Mffr. 



above the medal 



awarded to ter-eoilegiate athletics and every- 



All matter for publication should be ad- 
dressed to the Editor-In-Chief. 

All business communications should be ad- 
dressed to the Business Mgr., M. L. Neill. 



the one with the highest average. 

The Association will soon meet 

to hold its fourteenth session, 

Application made for entrj as second-class and it is to be hoped that our 
irail matter at the Postofflce at . ... 

| record for the past few years will 
I be altered and be placed back on 
I its old standard of winning first 



Jackson, Miss. 



Single Copy Per Annum 50 Cents 
Two Copies Per Annum 75 Cents 



EDITORIAL. 



M I 0 A 

In the summer of 1896, there 
was organized at Crystal Springs, 
Miss., what is popularly called the 
State contest. The founders of 
this association were representa- 
tives from the four leading mall 
colleges in the State, namely: A. 
& 51. College, Mississippi Col- 



rhing that goes to develop an 
interest for athletics and a live 
college spirit. 

He is a member of the Lamar 
Literary Society and one of the 
commencement debaters . At 
present he is Business Manager 
honors. Our representatives for of the Bobashela, Athletic Editor 
the past four years have suffer- Purple and White, ’Varsity foot- 
ed a gradual downfall, which is ball and baseball, Assistant Bus- 
not encouraging to us. In look- iness Manager Bobashela ’07, 
ing up the history of this Asso- Class Historian ’06 and ’07, Pa- 
eiation . we find that out of the triot’s Day speaker ’08, Y. M. 
thirteen contests, that Millsaps C. A. Delegate to Ruston. Secre- 
lias succeeded in bringing away tary L. L. S., contestant on 
six first honors, and two second Freshman and Sophomore contest, 
honors. Now that gives us twice right tackle on Preshman foot- 
as many first places as the Uni- ball team ’06, left half on Soph- 
versity or Mississippi Col- omore team ’07, left half and 

captain of Junior football team 
’08. Sophomore baseball ’08, 



| lege, and six times as many as the 
A . & M . Of course these second 
lege, I niversity of Mississippi 'nonors will not be rejected, but quarterback on Mississippi team 
and Millsaps College, who were the truth about the thing is that at Ruston. We feel sure of the 
invited there by the Mississippi they are not coveted. While 'we medal with Campbell as Millsaps 
Chautauqua Assembly to meet in do not wish to be greedy or self- representative. 

an oratoripal eontcat . j must— confess t hat w e ■ 

Their purpose in organizing want all the honor we can pro- A Great Constitutional Speech, 
this movement was to promote the j cure, and in order to effect this ' 

general educational interest we must support our representa- Friday night was election nignt 
throughout the State; to institute tive. in Galloway Literary Society, and 

eloser bonds of friendship and 1 despite the inclemency of the | 

union between these leading col- Representatives to the Chautau- ' weather, the members turned out 
leges; to elevate and encourage^ quas. : in large numbers to celebrate this 

the study, art and cultivation ot ' The faculty on Wednesday most exciting event. Since we 
oratory; and to meet annually in morning chose John W. Crisler were to select officers, the pro-’ 



contest to determine the promo- to represent Millsaps at the Crvs- 
tion, progress and advancement tal Sprlrjlgs Cnautauqua, which 
that we are making toward this comes off in the summer. The 

j faculty made a wise choice in 
The method which the associa- * selecting Crisler, as he is a strong 
tion has adopted for awarding and pleasing speaker and is hign- 
the medal is by no means im- ly capable of writing a good 
practical. It i3 this: Two sets of speech. 

judges, composed of three men j Entering college in 1907. he 
each, are appointed — one to grade will graduate in 1910, doing four 
the manuscript and the other to years’ work in three. He won 
grade the delivery. The four the Oscar Kearney Andrew’s 
vontestants are required to make Medal for oratory last year. He 
three copies of their speeches, has been chosen by the Lamar 
these are numbered and a copy of . Literary Society as one of the 
each is sent to the three judges ; commencement debaters, is a 
who have been chosen to grade member of the Y . M. C. A., Jun- 
manuscripts. When these have ior football and baseball, and is 
been graded, the results are a member of the Pi Kappa Al- 
mailed to the Secretary of the As- j pha fraterrfity. We are confi- 
sociation. who keeps them until dent of success with him as our 
the contest is over and the other 1 representative . 
set of judges has handed in their A . Boyd Campbell was also 
report, then he opens the sealed ehosen to represef.t Mills aps in 
grades before the audience trad the Hattiesburg cK^fltauqua . 



gram was not rendered, and in 



due time we found ourselves on; 



the verge of selecting 



officials 

to bear the burden of responsi- j 
bility in managing the proceed- 
ings of our society for the third ^ 
term . When this had been fully j 
carried out, the following results 
were announced: 

President T. A. Stennis; Vice- 
President, C. G. Terrell; Treas- 
urer, A. C. Anderson; Record-} 
ing Seceretary, H. M. Frizell; 
Assistant Secretary, W. A. 
Welch; Corresponding Secretary, 
S. S. Baekstrom. 

It has been our custom for sev- 
eral years to select the fourth- 
term President on this memora- 
ble occasion, so as to make him 
a conspicuous cognomen by in- 
serting a representative diagram 
of his facial features among the 
many famous characters who are 
so fortunate as to occupy a space 



in our Annual . After two stormy 
ballots on Messrs. Churehwcll, 
Hand and Witt, Mr. Thomas A. 
Stennis arose, and in a startling 
and impressive manner, insinuat- 
ed that fradulent methods were 
being used by the supporters of 
each candidate so as to effect their 
leader’s nomination. Mr. Frizell 
forthwith and immediately en- 
dorsed the veracious denuncia- 
tion of his predecessor in his ever 
ephemeial expression, “Evidently, 
Mr. President, something is radi- 
cally wrong.” The President 
then ordered a ballot, directed 
according to the Mississippi Code 
of Laws, where each man voted 
as his name was called, which re- 
sulted in an overwhelming vic- 
tory for Mr. Benjamin Franklin 
Witt, on first ballot. 

The principal feature of the 'ev- 
ening was Mr. Stennis’ speech on 
the constitutionality of the amend- 
ment offered by Mr. Mitchell, 
which provided for a Moot Court 
on the first meeting of each 
month and scarcely had the au- 
thor finished the indefatigable hill 
when the above gentleman launch- 
ed himself for an argument equal 
to that of James Z. George in 
defense of the Mississippi consti- 
tution . We would like very much 
to print his brilliant remarks in 
this edition, but owing to the ab- 
sence of the stenographer, a copy 
cannot be had at present. 

He first directed our attention 
to our mental unfitness to si't in 
a judge’s capacity, but to remove 
this inability to serve it was sug- 
gested that a member of the Law 
class might occupy the bench. 
He further stated that the pro- 
ceedings were to he carried out 
by the Mississippi Code of Laws, 
which would force us to execute 
the judge’s decree, thus assuring 
us of exciting times, should this 
he attempted, and possibly result 
in eliminating some of us from 
this institution. 

The President now ruled the 
speaker’s time up, and Mr. Welch 
began at once to defend the 
amendment from the standpoint 
that nothing like it had been 
brought before the Society pre- 
viously. After having discussed 
at length the benefits that would 
be deduced from this efficarious 
alteration of the legal document 
of the organization, the floor was 
yielded to the author, who began 
in burning eloquence to make a 
defense in behalf of the changed 
constitution, but to our regret the 




« to adjourn had come to ad- 

. rn, and the President issued a 

^ ol \'lamation declaring the House 

prr oumed. 

adj 

SOCIAL. 



fhe students of Millsaps were 
. ten quite a surprise on Monday 
^ l , pn they learned of the mar- 

TOJJ i 

ge of one of the eo-eds, Miss 
*n Griffin, to Mr. Oscar Pitt- 
n. a traveling salesman. The 

‘ prise, however, was not eonfin- 

SUr 

to the students. It aroused 

A I 

I entire community for no one 
rept the lovers themselves had 
ex '^Ti admitted to the secret. 

hf* k 

'^n the wedding morn Miss 

p tffin apparently started to 1 

jr )ool as usual, hut on her way. 1 
sch " 

^ ; was met by her affianced who 

jned her steps in another direc- 

fi. A waiting carriage soon ! 



^ : j j 

jned her steps in another direc- 1 
fi. A waiting carriage soon ! 

Tied the happy young couple 

l -the home of Rev. Charles W. I 

.ler, where, at 10 o ’clock that 

oe performed the solemn 

Is which made them man and 
wo 

wif * ! 

*. and Mrs. Pittman then re- 

x ?d to the bride’s former home 
*e they obtained forgiveness 
^received parental blessings. 

. /jj25_lbey hoarded the train 
for Gulfport, where they will stay 
for a while at the Great Southern, 
and from that city they will go 
on to New Orleans for Mardi 
Gras. j 

The bride is one of Jackson’s 
fairest daughters. Her rare beau- 
ty and charming maimer have 
won for her a host of friends and 
•—admirers. She belongs to a 
prominent family and has for some 
time held an enviable position in 
Jackson ’sf social circles. The 
marriage of this popular world is 
of especial interest to the little 
“campus world,” since the bride 
of today was so recently one of 
our number. Miss Griffin was en- 
* rolled as a student of our col- 
l lege at the beginning of the sec- 
ond term, only two weeks ago. ! 
Her stay among us was brief ; yet 
she has a number of friends on 
the campus who wish her all hap- 
piness. 

The groom is a traveling sales- 
man, representing a large shoe, 
factory in New York. For the! 
past two years he has made our; 

apilal City his headquarters aud 
V-re he is regarded as an excel- 
lent young business man 

The Purple and White joins the 
many other friends in heartiest 



congratulations and best wishes, ly announcing his belief in the 
Last Saturday evening Miss theory that kissing is unsanitary. 
Adele Knowles entertained the During his lectures through the 
Kappa Alpha and Kappa Mus at northern part of the State, Dr. 
a quaint and original valentine Mayer announced his belief, and 
party. Her home was charmingly | while his remarks were half in 
decorated in colors of both the jest, they were received with much 
brother and sister fraternities. ! seriousness, especially when he ad- 
The most interesting feature of dressed the student bodies in the 
the evening was a spirited valen- j State educational institutions at 
tine contest. Each girl was Oxford. Columbus and Stark- 
given a card and a pencil and told ville. ” — Jackson Daily News, 
to write thereon an original verse . 

Professor Walmsley acted as Stuart G. Noble, Jackson, Miss., 
judge, hence no one has question- Should you ever want to kiss 
ed the decision. The gentlemen’s Any maiden you may know, 
pribe, “The Fair Mississippian, ” Heed Fred Mayer and go slow, 
was awarded to Mr. A. B. Camp- 
bell, while Miss Bertha Ricketts “His remarks were half in je3t,” 
won the ladies’ prize, a bunch of But the other half is best, 
white carnations. Should you fail, or should you 

Dainty refreshments were then kiss, 
served by two dainty little maids, j There is danger — hit or miss. 
Misses Margaret Walmsley and 
Derail Knowles. Be a sanitary man. 

Kiss as gently as you can, 

Dr. and Mrs. Swartz enter- 1 Let it be a blunder-buss 
tained the Rev. Dr. Sullivan and Which would prove disasterous. 
wifd at dinner last Saturday. 

This was a most enjoyable occa- — W. F. M., ’06. 



This was a most enjoyable occa- — W. F. M., ’06. 

sion for the hosts and the guests 
who partook of their hospitality. 

Dr. Sullivan has been confined to : College Directory, 

his room for quite a long time, ' 

and we &i» gi*d to know Qr* Edit^in F 
he is again able to be out: I- Witt. 

. i Business Manager — W. A. Welch. 

The Pi Kappa Alpha boys were Bobashela, Editor-m-Chief T. L. 
the fortunate guests at a recep-' Bailey. 

tion given on the evening of the Business Manager— A. B. Camp- 
fifth by Miss Mary Bailey in hon- 1 bell. 

or of her friend, Miss Dorothy Purple and White, Editor-inChief 
Riddick, from Canton. | Robert H. Ruff. 

Miss Bailey’s home was taste- Business Manager M. L. Neil, 
fully decorated in the fraternity President Galloway Society T. 
colors, garnet and old gold, and Stennis. 

these, combined with the beauti- . President Lamar Society— R. J. 
ful costumes of the young ladies J Mullins, 
served to make the scene a most Representative M. I. 0. A. T. 
attractive one. During the ev-i k. Bailey, 
ening fruit was served, followed , Crystal Springs Chautauqua J. 
by a delightful course. The hours i ^ • Crisler. 
flitted past on magic wings, and Hattiesburg Chautauqua A. B. 
only too soon were the young men Campbell, 
forced to bid their charming Representative Southern T niv. 
young hostess “good-night,” as- j Debate R. J. Mullins, Robt. 



young hostess “good-night” as- j ueoate— it. u. 

suring her that such courtesies as Ro- 

llers are long cherished in the t Baseball 'Manager T. A. Sten- 



hearts of college men. 

To Stuart G. Noble: A Post-Val- 
entine Reflection. 

“Dr. Fred G. Meyer, field lec- 



Basketball Manager — J. M. 

Gwin. 

Gym. Director — Prof. S. G. No- 

l.le. 

The following fraternities have 



turer of the State Board of active chapter: Kappa Alpha. 1 
Health, who is now conducting Kappa Sigma and Pi Kappa Al- 
a campaign of sanitation and hy- pha . The Phi Delta fraternity, 
giene in the State, has created local, and Kappa Mu. local sor- 
somewhat of a furrore by public- ority. 



Lamar Literary Society. 

The literary program for the 
night was above par, not only 
were all of the debators present 
but they all fulfilled their parts 
with credit. The debate: Re- 

solved, That State Colleges and 
Universities Should Be Preferred 
to Those Under the Control of 
Religious Denominations, was 
well debated on the affirmative by 
Messrs. Hollified, Coggin and 
Donnell ; on the negative by 
Messrs. Cooper. Livingston and 
Savage. Tne judges favored the 
negative fjide. The .\x tempo ra- 
ucous debate excited more inter- 
est than any other part of the 
program. The question: Re- 

solved That the Burning of the 
Dormitory Barn Was a More 
Heinous Crime Than the Dis- 
memberment of Dr. Sullivan’s 
Buggy, was one that was fresh 
in the minds of every one ; surely 
no one had forgotten those hor- 
rible (crimed. The debators on 
the question were, for the affirm- 
ative. Messrs. CrlsKn and A. A. 
Green: for the negative, Messrs. 
Ford Bufkin and Gus Kelly. La- 
mar himself could not have ex- 
celled the last speaker on the neg- 
-*-yr- /n*--. — —key nut only 
proved to the society Thai the 
burning of the barn was a good 
deed but he also showed that the 
dismemberment of the buggy was 
a most heartless crime that could 
have been committed oMv hv har- 
dened criminals. He pictured very 
vividly the buggy hunt that was 
made by Dr. Sullivan, Carruthers 
Sullivan and Dr. Ackland on one 
of the coldest mornings of the 
season. 

The following term officers were 
elected : President third term, R. 
J. Mullins ; president fourth 
term. A. F. Kelly; treasurer, 
Ilollifield ; recording secretary, 
Wimberly; corresponding secre- 
tary, Brewer; critic, Crisler; cen- 
sor, Guinn; door keeper, Savage; 
monthly orator, Donnell. 

The following from “Just Out 
of College,” has been submitted 
to the editor for publication: 

“According to Sully. Sully 
His equasions are always right, 

He is always an authority from 

Oxygen to Sulphite, 

'Cording to Sully, Sully 
In Cheur or Physies bully 
To gain a Bachelor’s degree 
Be ruled according to Sully. ” 



i 



THE PURPLE AMD WHITE 



LOCALS. 

Fail in line. Get a pompadour. 

I. B. Ridgway is taking vapour 
battles to reduce his weight. 

The Detective-Preacher Pinson 
has just departed. Look out for 
opium dens in Jackson ! 

Ed Brewer of the Junior Latin 
class, is quite anxious to know 
“who rode his pony away.” 

We deeply sympathize with our 
fellow-student. W. B. McCarthy, 
in the loss of his mother. 

W. E. and T. H. Phillips 
were called home last wek on ac- j 
count of the death of their grand- 
mother. 

Time : Tuesday morning, tem- 
perature freezing. Scene: a sport 
and a co-ed meet on the walk. 
Theme discussed: the weather. 

Strange! Strange!! Dr. Sulli- j 
van refused to let the Junior 
Chemistry class take notes Tues- 
day morning. 



made the hit of the evening was Telephone 8 — 
that rendered by Messrs. Moore, 

Duke and Jumper, entitled, 

“April Fools. ” This novel and 
original part of the program of- 
fered much laughter and joy to 
all present. 



Mr. Ralph Moore, Prof. 

Moore’s younger brother, has ma- 
triculated with us. All the Sophs, 
pronounce him a “snark” in 
chemistry ; and the Junior Physics 
class is afraid that he will break 
the Junior Class record and pass 
for the year. 

Our Glee Club “song birds” 
have returned from their annual 
tour of the northern part of the 

State, mittog Colnmb^, Great- j g P j; CI ^ L kaWT, STUDENTS 
da and Carrollton. Tney all re- 



Majestic Restaurai |t 

Modern — up-to-date 

Solicits your patronage 



TYPEWRITING 

Neatly and Accurately Executed. 



G. W. SISTRUNK 

Handles all Kinds of 

Good things to eat. 



_A new LySfy^t^le h^j^ eS 



— 

B. students interested will call on 
Mr. C. C. Hand, also Mr. Ralph 
Applewhite. 

A new book has just been pub- 
lished by Prof. H. T. Moore, en- 
titled, “now to Live on $4.98 a 
Week, (and love).” Price 25c 
Railroad edition, 15c. 

Some one Suggested that 'he 
did not see where any fault could 
be found in dancing. According 
to his statements, even the saints 
dance. Upon being questioned, 
he suggested, St. Vitus. 

We note with great regret the 
grievous calamity and humiliation 
of two of our fellow students, 
Messrs. John Crisler and Henry 
Frizell. If yon want to know of 
their troubles, “Ask Ruth Grey. ” 
liadies free. 



port a great time, and at Colum- 
bus, Prof. Moore was afraid that 
he was going to lose two or three 
of his famed singers. All can 
guess the attraction. 

The November, December and 
January numbers of the Collegian 
embodied under the name of 
“The January Issue,” came tear- 
ing out a few days ago. We are 
glad to note the fact that the Col- 
legian is a book, although there 
is nothing in it. 

During €he Psychology pe- 
riod Tuesday manning, “Prep” 
Waqson informed Dr. Murrah 
that where he came from the 
got down on their knees 

number died. I think “'Prep f j 
is the only man here from that 



A. L. CHAMBERS, 

Care Hederman Bros. 
Residence Thone 1208. 
Jackson, :::::: Mis*. 



Goods always fresh and pri 
reasonable . 

Nice line of Stationery on han 

Give him a trial 



ces 



When clothes are soiled 
Hav e them boiled 

Get Eizzy 
Ring Izzy 

Jackson Steam Laundry. 

PHONE 730 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 
College Photographer. 

Jackson, 

Miss 

Capitol St., near Bridge. 



D: . 



It has been rumored that Hon. 
T. F. Baker, an honorary mem- 
ber of the law class, who has been 
absent for a month attending to 
legal business in Fayette, is con- 
templating practicing law with 
Hon . Charles Scott . 



section of the” State . 

Dr. Kern was slated to umpire 
a basket ball game at ’Clin'ton 
Monday afternoon between Mis- 
sissippi College and the State 
University. He received a tele- 
phone message in the earlier part 
of the day. however, stating that 
the game had been called off on 
account of the unfavorable weath- 
er conditions. Dr. Kerns seems 
in basket ball as in foot ball, to 
be making himself a great rep- 
utation as an umpire. 

Tuesday night witnessed one of 
the greatest events of the college 
year. We were highly entertain- 
ed for two hours by the Glee Club 
at the College Chapel. The Glee 
Club sang to a crowded house; 
and no doubt the number present 
would have been much larger had 
the weather conditions been 
more farvorable. The selections 
presented by Mrs. James B. 
Cooper and Miss Reilly were ex- 
ceptionally good, and added much 
tT> the evening’s entertainment. 
The part of the program that 

A 



THIS DOES NOT AP- 
PLY TO OLD AGE 

Most people under forty years of 
age do not wear gla-ses to improve vis- 
ion. but to get relief from pain and suf- 
fering in one form or ano her, brought 
on by ceaseless struggle of the compli- | 
Totted muscular system of-*-ee eye*— The ' 
~br-*in d'-rua-us clear images and the 
nerves and muscles under the whiolash 
of this demand overcome errors in the 
formation of the eyeballs (Errors of re- 
fraction), by an intense muscular action 
which we term eyestrain 

The object of the lenses then is to cor- 
rect the error by adding to or taking 
from the refractive system of the eye- 
ball, thus doing the work in front of the 
eye and thereby permitting the eye to 
see with its nerves aud muscles at the 
rest. 

Every case is a law unto itself, and 
the practicioner must have a thorough 
knowledge of this intricate visual ap- ] 
paratus in order to meet and overcome 
the various aud varied optical phenom- 
ena. 



WHEN DOWN TOWN 

Drop in at 

Your Old Friend’s Fountain, 
BOTH HOT and COLD DRIx or 
J. S. MANGUM, KS 
At Hunter & McGee’s. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Jackson, V iss= > 

Millsaps College offers courses leading 
to two degrees: H A & B. S. 

For Catalogue, address 

W. B. MCKR ' H, Pres. 



E. R. v. SEUTTER, 

Dr. of Optics, Dr. of Opthalmology 
250 E. Capitol St., Upstairs. 

Jackson, Miss. 



go to 

JACKSON MERCANTILE 
COMPANY. 

for Fancy Groceries and all kinds 
of Feed Stuffs. Same quality at 
lower prices. . Prompt deliverty is 
our motto. 



HEDERMAN 

BROTHERS 

PRINTERS 

PUBLISHERS 

BOOK 

BINDERS 



I 



E. H. GALLOWAY, M. D. 
Century Building. 
Jackson, Miss. 



Cor. Pearl aud Congress Streets 

Jackson, Miss. “ 



/ 



t 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 




QUAE FIANT, EX HOC COGNOSCES. 




Volume I. 


Jackson, Mississippi, February 26, 1909. 


Number 8. 


ATHLETICS. 

The past week has been the live- 


j who weiv interested in track 
work. It was found that every- 
body was very enthusiastic and 


had. We will have at least ten 
thousand people ot here. I have 
J seen the time when the campus 


“Second. That we do not en- 
dorse te action taken by Confer- 
ence in Yazoo City and believe 



li.;st we have experiecned in ath- ready to begin work at once. Mr. 
leties for some time. We have Welch was requested to call on 



had three real live baseball games, some of the business men in town 
tennis ever}' afternoon and above : and invite them to give prizes to 



would be covered with horses and , that they should understand more 
buggies on a Field Day. People fully the real conditions here be- 



all, the working out of the candi- 
dates for the track team. Things 
are certainly taking on a very 
prosperous and healthy appear- 
ance for the aspiring athlete and 
the only pang that comes to us 
is when we think that our ath- 
letic events are all to be pulled 
off in the confines of our own cam- 
pus. That outside of the student 
body and a close circle of friends, 
no one will ever know of our great 
rthletes and their performances. 
That we will not have the oppor- 
tunity to mingle with, and demon- 
strate superiority over the stu- 
dents of other colleges. Oh no, 



the winners of the various ath- 
letic events on Field Day. We 
have since learned from Mr. 



will come here from all over the 
State, and it will be the next 
thing to an inter-collegiate game. 
I myself, am thinking of enter- 
ing for the ‘sock race. ’ ” What 



fore taking any action whatever 
in regard to athletics. 

“Third. That we endorse the 
Purple and White in the fight it 
is making for athletics, and that 
we pledge our support, and that a 
copy of these resolutions be pub- 
that the business men take the he is evidently very sincere in his lished in the Purple and White 

; belief that Field Day will be a 
great success, and we are obliged 
j to share his opinion. 



Welch that he has been very sue- Dr. Ackland meant by the “sock 
cessful in this enterprise and finds j race” is not clearly known, but 



proposition very readily. 



Track Team. 



Hurrah for Professor Noble and j 
our track team ! Rave you seen j 
them work out ? If not, come out [ 
to the “cinder path” any after- 
noon after 4 o’clock and you will 
find half an hundred boys working 
like turks to land a berth on the 
team . J Professors Noble says he 



gentlemen of the Conferences, we is very much encouraged over 
have not forgotten, we cannot, we ! the outlook, and says that we have 
will not forget our aspirations and material here as goou as can be 



hopes for inter-collegiate athlet- 
ics. 

Quite a number of our boys 
went over to Clinton ana saw the 
University of Mississippi basket 
ball team defeat the Mississippi 
College team in a very fast and 
well played game. As we stood 
on the side lines and listened to 
those ringing college yells and 
songs, as the entire student body 
cheered their team, our minds re- 
verted to a time when we stood 
on the side lines and cheered mad- 
ly for our own team as they play- 
ed fiercely against the well-train- 
ed Mississippi College team, and 
although we went down in defeat 
that day, we felt that we had not 
lost the victory. We were play- 
ing inter-collegiate athletics, and 
felt that we had a very bright fu- 
ture before us, but now — 

Track Manager Elected . 

At a meeting of the Athletic 
Association Wednesday morning. 
Feb. 17th, Mr. W. A. Welch 
was elected manager ot track ath- 
letics. After the election of the 
manager, Professor Noble gave a 
If tie talk on the prospects- for a 
track team this spring, and then 
asked for expressions from others 



found anywhere in the South. 

Quite a number of our boys are 
now taking long runs daily and 
are sticking to a course of train- 
ing as rigid as cireumsianees will 
permit. We are going to keep 
this up until Field Day. and then indeed . 
we are going to establish some 
records that will make Wafers. 
Longboot, Flannagan, Boyd and 
other great track men, sit up and 
take notice. 



Baseball . 

We have had three practice 
games of baseball this week and 
all of them go to show that there 
is going to be a surplus of good 
baseball players here this spring. 
The regular schedule of games has i 
not been announced by Manager | 
Stennis yet, but the teams are j 
now pretty well organized, and 
ater a few more practice games 
they will be ready for the reg- 
ular schedule . At present it seems 
fnat the Freshmen are a shade I 
stronger than the other teams, j 
and when their team work is per- J 
fected they will be very strong l 



and the Collegian. 

(Signed) . 

“Margurite Park, 
“Courtney Clingan, 
“Mary Bailey, 
“Margaret Sanms. 
“Cecile Hudnall, 
“Edith MeCluer, 
“Irma Graves, 
“Myrtle Johnson, 
“Nellie Dodds. 

“Mary Lin field, 

“Alice Brown. 

“Bertha Ricketts. 
“Evelyn Folkes, 
“Pearl Spann, 

“Rose Austin, 

“Annie Maie Cooper.” 



Interview With Dr . Askland . 

. ... in 

After repeated attempts, a re- ( their vocabulary. We are cer- 
porter for this paper has been j tainly glad to have them join us 



able to secure an interview with 
Dr. Ackland, on the subject of 
athletics. He found the Doctor 
very much discoui-agea over in- 
ter-collegiate prospects, but en- 
thusiastic over the track team. 
He said: “We must keep ham- 

mering and hammering at them 
Conference fellows until they 
give s what we want . I am ready 



New Marathon Runner . 

i Look out, Johnny Hays! Tom 
Phillips is in training for dis- 
tance running. He has actually 
cut out “Pic-nie Twist.” gets up 
every morning at 6 o’clock and 
runs about two miles, after which 

, . . „ „he takes a cold shower bath. 

Mulsaps co-ed, is rally aware-of 

i - . . \\ onders will never cease! 

the fact that fail is not in _ 

Field Day Events. 

’ Mr. Welch, the track manager, 
has handed us a list of events for 



Hurrah for the Co-eds . 

Inter-collegiate athletics is in 
sight ! The co-eds have taken up 
the matter, and everybody who 
knows anything at ail about a 



in the fight. We knew their sen- 
timents all the time and knew that 
they would speak at the oppor- 
tune time. The following resolu- 
tions have been handed the ath- 
letic editor for publication : 
“Since we wish to do every- 
thing in our power to promote 
the interest of our college, and 
realizinfi that nothing can do more 



which prizes will be given 



to go to Conference with Major | towards furthering its interests 



and Dr. Hurrah and make a 
speech, but that there Williams 
buy would tear up everything 
while I was gone. ” When asked 
what he thought of the track team 
and prospects for Field Day, he 
said : “We are going to have the 
biggest Field Day we have ever 



than inter-collegiate athletics ; 
therefore, be it 

“Resolved, That we. the co-eds 
of Millsaps College in mass meet- 
ing assembled — 

“First. That we are heartily 
in sympathy with inter-collegiate 
athletics. 



on 

| Field Day. The events are as 
1 follows, and no doubt there will 
; be a large number of entries for 
ach event: 

Hundred yard dash. 

220 yard dash . 

Quarter mile run. 

Half mile run. 

Mile run. 

Running high jnmp. 

Running broad jump. 

Standing broad jump. 

Pole vault. 

Short put. 

Hammer throwing. 

Hurdle race. 

(Continued on page 3) . 





THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



The Purple and White is very nearly evenly divided and greater honors upon your brow The extemporaneous debate was 
■ ~ there is a good argument on both of fidelity. as usual, very interesting. The 

Published Weekly by the Junior sides. Now it is up to our rep- 1 debaters on the affirmative were 

Class of Millsaps College resentatives to show that tariff* Prof. M. W. Swartz and wife Messrs. Campbell, A. B., and 



Class of Millsaps College resentatives to show that tariff* Prof. M. W. Swartz and wife Messrs . Campbell, A. B., and 
for protection should be abolish- left Sunday to attend Mardi Gras Savage, on the negative, Messrs. 

BOBT. H. RUFF .... Editor-in-Chl«f- , , , . . , 

e. c. brewer .... Associate Editor- ed. and also the sessions of the meet- Johnson, C. E., Sharborough, R. 

A. B. CAMPBELL .... Athletic Editor- . . , 

mss MARGARET saums ^social Editor- 1 We are sorry that our college ing of the Classical Association B. The question, Resolved, That 

Loeai editor- has not taken more interest in of the Middle West and South to theB. S. course is better than the 

¥■ w ; , Bn»iaea* Mgr. inter-collegiate debates. There is be held Wednesday and Thurs- A. B. course, was decided in fa- 

A. F. KELLY .... Assistant Bus. Mgr. i 0 ^ 



M. L. NEILL 
A. F. KELLY 



- - I no better way of broadening and day of this week. Professor vor of the affirmative. 

AU “dressed to the l Mu i or“in?chi»f. b ® ad ' developing a man than by taking Swartz, who is Vice-President of .Mr. Thomas H. Phillips was 
di^sse^to^rfe 0 B^mess Mirier M^L.^Ne^u.^" P art ' n a good, lively debate. It the Association for Mississippi, elected as monthly orator. 

’ - ~ develops a man into a strong will read a paper before the As- j 

Entered as second-class matter Jannary22, i , . . ... , . , . ! _ , 

1909 , at the postofflee at Jackson, Miss.. , reasoner and thinker. Many of soeiation on the religious element R. B. Alexander says that 

under act of Congress, March, 3, 1879 I , , ,, , , . ... , 

=— — .. the leading colleges and univer- m the life of the old men and there is a man in ms town who 

Single Copy Per Annum 50 Cents sities have from three to six in- women in the drama.3 of Euri- is so stingy that he will climb a 

Two Copies Per Annum 75 Cents ter-eollegiate debates and we pides. ten-rail fence to keep from open- 

- should at least have a series with I Tnis Association is an organi- ing the gate and wearing the 

EDITORIAL. ^he other three leading colleges zation of the teachers of Latin hinges out. No wonder “Alec” 



Millsaps Southern University De- 
bate. 

In 1906 the societies of 



| in the State. and Greek in the middle West is making such a good race for 

and South, and has a membership college liar. 

The Mid-Session Debate. of some 2,000 of the most progres- j — o — 

sive teachers in that section of We have recently noticed that 
Fellows, wnat has become of, the country known as the Mis- Mr. Halsey, the mad cap youth 



The Mid-Session Debate. 



the Southern University chal- jour mid-session debate? The cur- sissippi Valley in its broadest sig- of New York, in the strength of 
lenged the two societies of rent reports about these exercises , nifieation. for the Association ex- bumpers of champagne, is winning 
Millsaps for a joint de-! ari not very encouraging, and it tends from Idaho to West Vir- fame as a play wright. Brother 
bate. Our societies accepted the is to be hoped they are false and ginia. and from Wisconsin to Duke, however, makes a substi- 
challenge and C. C. Applewhite incredible. You must not forget Louisiana. tute of grape juice and produces 

was chosen from the Galloway 'the great reproach that fell on last The Association is represented a tragedy in I. Act. 

and W. A. Williams from the years’ debaters, and should you in each Staie by a Vice Presi- ^ 

Lamar. The first debate was ' attempt this precedent, still dent elected at the yearly meet- 

held at Greenboro, Ala., the seat greater criticism should fall up- ings. Last year at Nashville, SOCIAL. 



SOCIAL. 



of the University. 



on you. Such practices are, by Professor Swartz was chosen as 



Our representatives upheld the 110 means deserving — they are the Vice-President for Mississippi, Tne Kappa Sigma boys were 
affirmative of the following ques ^foolish, absurd and preposterous! which office he has held during royally entertained on Saturday 



tion, Resolved : That Cuba should See wherein the trouble lies, the past year. 



evening by the new additions to 



be annexed to the United States. 'If you have been thrown with an During the past year the mem- their numbers. The scene of this 
After a hard fought debate. Mill- ! indifferent debater, ask him to bership of the Association has happy occasion was Hotel Royal, 

saps succeeded in winning the resign, or bring the matter before gifeatfly increased in the State, where the “new” hosts had ev- 

question. ° jyour society; and if this be not and Professor Swartz asserts that erything in readiness to receive 

The second debate was held the cause, blame yourselves with there will be next year a still their guests. The spacious din- 

here in our chapel last April. ,laek of interest, negligence and greater increase. — Jackson Daily ing room was tastefully decorated 



Groty and Berry represented the ( remissness . We are deficient in News. 

Southern University, while Blount this phase of our college work 
and Collins were our representa- and the best remedy is to be more 
tives. Millsaps submitted the ' generous in shoving off our apa- ** 

following question and thj oppo- thy and in grasping a new zeal 
jients chose the affirmative. Re- for furthering our interests which (,u 
solved: That, compared with state tire at stake. ing do 

power, the federal power is undu- 1 Debases should b.y held with ^ r 
lv increasing. Again Millsaps the colleges with whom we com- 

* • i ° 'WclS I 

Was Victorious. in Win nrntnrinnl prmtpst anH 



News. in the fratemiay colors. A large 

number of Kappa Sigma pennants 
adorned the walls, and in addi- 
Lamar Literary Society . tron to these several pennants of 

purple and white were present to 
On account of the mass meet- show that Alpha Upsilon is ever 
ing down town the attendance was ] 0 yal to “Old Millsaps. ” 
not quite os large as usual.- A delightful luncheon was serv- 
As retiring President Brooks ,->(j j n seven courses and was 
was sick he was unable to greatly enjoyed by every one. 



IS Victorious . r>ete in thp oratorical contest and “J - 

rr-i . rl hit ff • • , . - ’ be present and deliver the Mr. Longstreet Cavett acted 

The third debate comes off in m order to inaugurate these we „ . , .- + 



April at Greensboro. Brown and must not be so dilatory in the 
Pennington will represent the few we now have. It seems as if 

Southern University. Mullins and you do not realize the extent to . . , r , .. , » , , 

tj, «. ... ‘ . , , , ident Mullins delivered one of the er be forgotten by those who taste 

Ruff representing Millsaps. They -which you can develop vourself , , ,, ... . o „ , . . J, , 

•„ , , . f ,, - „. ' , ,. j* , . greatest addresses that has ever 0 f their joys. They have a last- 

will debate the following question, through this medium, and to bring , . . . ., . . , mi, . „ , , , 

t. c , . r rv , 0 . .. A . been heard in the society hall. The i n g effect, for they bring the hoys 

Resolved: That the time nas come about this realization let us lm- ... , , , , . 

. , ... tt a c< 4 - * ,i , . literary program was very good, into a closer relationship, 

when the United States should press upon you the importance of ...... t-. „„ . . „ , ,, „ , , , . 

. , . .- , F L The question, Resolved, That the strengthening the fraternal bond 

abolish protective tariff. The op- discharging the duties that your „ - „ liuk , , ... 



great valedictory address whicii toastmaster, acquitting himself 
he had so carefully prepared. Vith much credit. 

After being duly installed Pres- j Such occasions as this will nev- 



^ loiiax. lire UP- UlSUIlrtl tilt: UU11CB tlldL V U Ui 0 , . • a. C 

.. .. 1 - , , , . State convict farms should be and making them brothers indeed. 

ponents submitted the question society nas reposed in you. 

n i „„„„ ± 4 - m ■» j -i • * abolished and the convicts put on Tli e Kappa Sigmas are promis- 

and our representatives had choice ; ^ A & ^ 

e* • t /v» » • I Recall the pledge to whicn you tne public roads, was well debat- e d another treat before many 

ot sides, the affirmative was se- , . -. . 

^ nave subscribed; renew your en- e d on the affirmative by Messrs, days. Mrs. S. J. Johnson has 

thusiasm; east off all indepen- Clark, G. C. Hollifield and Berry, invited the local chapter and the 

This is a good, live, interesting dence; carry out these exercises; on the negative by Messrs. Ray, sisters to a reception at her 

--~tion which is before the and your society will merit her Carson and Steen. The judges }, oine 0 n the evening of March 

•iean people. The question true worth by showering her decided in favor of the negative. 5th. 



PURPLE AND WHITE 



(Continued from pafe 1) . 

ATHLETICS. 

Boost 'Field Day, and you will 
be a promoter of the biggest day 
in the athletic history of Alillsaps 



leaders should he given subjects 
at least two weeks beforehand. 
They must have time to collect 
their thoughts and get new ideas 
if we expect them to give us any- 



College. Go to see Dr. Ackland thing worth while 
I if you want to get over enthusi- Mr * Alford addr *»* d us Fri ‘ 



I 



fistic on this subject. 



day night on the subject, ‘ 4 Christ 

j j-j niunmloo 7 7 



My Love . 

I love mv old Geology 
if And everything that’s in it, 
I always keep it at my side 
[I And read it every minute. 



It’s better than a picture book, 
It’s better than a toy, 
g And as I turn each precious page 
My heart is filled with joy. 



Business. ” He directed his 
thoughts from these very appro 
1 priate words of the Psalmist, 
“And I set the Lord always be 
fore me . ’ ’ He showed us how 
necessary it is to ever gain any- 
thing permanent. He said that 
a man might acquire great posses- 
sions by dishonest means, but that 
sooner or later, as the flower with- 
ers under the influence of the 
noonday sun, so shall his posses- 



0 see the squid— the darling squid sions fade away and he himSelf 



A funny kid is he, 



be relegated to the background of 



(The petted, pampered member of societ y b >’ the onswoop of Chris 



The Mollusc familv. 



tian sentiment. 

We were very glad to have Dr. 
Murrali talk to us Sunday night. 
It is very seldom we are able to se- 
! cure him, on account of the grow- 
ing demand for him to fill pulpits 
in oth^r parts of the State. The 
And when I’m feeling sorrowful snh ^ of his talk was, “Chris 
I know just what 1 need, 



0 see the shining Asteroid 

1 With petals like a flower. 
I often gaze upon the page, 

Forgetful of the hour. 



I open my Geology 
And then begin to read. 



nd so I love Geology 
| And happily peruse it 
i’ll keep it always at my side 
And never will abuse it. 



[And whan I come to pass away. 
And leave this world of woe, 
list give me my Geology 
I won’t care where I go. 



Y. M. C. A. 



There has been a slight decline 
i the interest taken in the Young 
(en’s Christian Association the 
st week or so. We do not know 
rhy this should be. It could 
>rdly have been the fault of the 
aders, for they handled their 
Objects exceptionally well. The 



bvotional committee has shown 



tianity as a Reserve Force.” He 
showed hiw important reserve 
force is for any one to have suc- 
cess along any line. As in the 
case of banks the reserve is ab- 
solutely necessary in order to 
, withstand the great crisis in pan- 
ics. or as with the five wise vir- 

t 7 

gins who were blessed because 
they had brought a reserve supply 
. of oil with their lamps, just so 
, it is with us, we must be allied 
with Christ and have access to his 
; powers in order to be able to tide 
over the rough places of this life . 
Hi* talk would also apply to 
many in a financial way as well 
as spiritual . For too many are 
spending money for unnecessary 
things, when they should be keep- 
ing it inreserve for times of scar- 
city. Many little know the worth 
of a dollar. We 3o not believe 
in worshiping the dollar, but no- 
where does our Lord teaeh us to 



LOCALS. 



Tom Stennis says brown 
cost about three dollars. 



hats 



Widow” handkerchief.” He 
asked Ruth Grey who declined to 
answer. 



Have you voted — if not, 
‘Nuts” and get a Da not. 



see 



Dr. Murrah was out of town 
several days last week. 



“Boost” the Purple and White 
and the world “boosts” with you. 



A. M. Teal was called home 
on account of the death of his 
mother. 



Air. Will Decell’s father came 
out to see him for a short time 
Monday afternoon. 



From the present deplorable 
condition of circumstances our 
Varsity baseball team will play 
“antv over” this spring instead 
of baseball . 



The Glee Club played a conspic- 
uous part in the sacred contest 
given by the. ladies of the St. 
Andrews Episcopal Church Tues- 
day evening, Feb. 23 , 1909. 



Miss Mamie Cooper oi Yazoo 
City, spent several days with Miss 
Annie May Cooper this week. 
Her stay has been one of great 
pleasure and we hope she will re- 
turn very soon. 



Vote the Prohibition ticket. 
Gus Kelly for President, Bill Leg- 
sett for Vice-President. 



lev. J. W. Magee, ’05, chap- 
lain of the State Penitentiary, was 
on the campus last week. 



Some one has entered he charge 
against Rip Peeples of continual- 
ly “cussing” without anger. 



Mounger, (on street car) — Sav, 
Mitchell, what time is it? 

Mitchell, (pointing to the con- 
ductor’s register — It is 4 o’clock 
by that clock, but I don’t think 
it’s quite that late. 



The Collegian staff is offering 
heavy reward for the escope 
of the “Hoodlum” editor. 



Dr. W. B. Murrah will lecture 
in the town Y. M. C. A. hall 



Dr. Walmsley in History — 
“What became of the anti-feder- 
alist party after the triumph of 
the federalists?” 

Gwinn. (in a solemn voice) — 
“They no longer existed.” 



Dr. Kern went to Clinton last 
Wednesday afternoon to umpire 
a basket ball game between Mis- 



on Sunday afternoon at 3 o ’clock. ! sissippi College and the State 

o J University. The University boys 

We are very glad to know that were victorious, playing the Clin- 
Dr. W. T. Sullivan is able to ' ton boys to the tune of 26 to 11 . 
be up and walk about on his ! 



crutches. 



After getting a new camera, ! 



the photographer came back and j 



took another 
French Club. 



picture of the 



od judgment in their selections 
leaders. They are to be com- 
mended for the good work they 



/ be wasteful . 



Last Friday night the Glee Club 



At a recent meeting of the Min- 
nehaha Literary Society our co- 
‘eds debated the following ques- 
! tion : Resolved, That Anticipation 
is better than realization. ’ ’ One of 
better than relaization . ’ ’ One of 
the girls on the affirmative put up 
Tom Phillips has entered the a strong line of argument in 
charge against Boyd Campbell of which she used this illustration: 
continually laughing without “Suppose a boy is going to see 
myth . his girl, and all that day ha is an- 

— © — I ticipating the bliss of a kiss. Well, 

Rev. J. E. Williams, pastor he goes to see the girl, spends a 
of the Tylertown Methodist pleasant evening and gets his hat 



■e doing. But I understand that , rendered several selections before Church, was visiting friends on to leave. He faulters a mom ant 



ie leaders are selected during the a mass meeting of the Law and the campus Tuesday, 
freek in which they are to lead. Order League of Jackson, Miss. 



and asks for his “anticipation.’ 



and when the “anticipation” is 



bis should never be. The lit- ; From the fact that they are so Wyatt Easterling, a promising about to be realized, the boy dis- 

ary societies always adopt a often called upon to participate young lawyer of Meridian, came covers that she has false teeth, 

aestion two weeks ahead. And in the program of the different out to see his college friends for Now, from this illustration, it 

re not the subjects to be discuss- meetings and entertainments, we a few minutes Monday night . seems clear to me that anticipa- 
nt in the Association of much judge that the public is about to — o — tion is better than realization. ” 

nore importance than those of the realize that they are real song Air. Augustus Kelly wants to Two of the girls, however, were 
^■psociety? If so, then the stera. know “where he lost his Alerry inclined to be pessimistic. 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



College Directory. 



Editor-in-Chief Collegian — B. F. 
Witt. 

Business Manager — W. A. Welch. 
Bobashela. Editor-in-Chief — T. L. 
Bailey. 

Business Manager — A. B. Camp- 
bell. 

Purple and White. Editor-inChief 
— Robert H. Ruff. 

Business Manager — M. L. Neil. 
President Galloway Society — T . 
A. Stennis. 

President Lamar Society — R. J. 
Midi ins. 

President Y. M. C. A. — W. A. 
Welch. 

Representative M. I. 0. A. — T. 
L. Bailey. 

Crystal Springs Chautauqua — J. 
W. Crisler. 

Hattiesburg Chautauqua — A. B. 
Campbell. 

Representative Southern TJniv . 
Debate — R. J. Mullins, Robt. 
R. Ruff. 

President Athletic Association — 
J. M. Guinn. 

Baseball Manager — T. A. Sten- 
nis. 

Basketball Manager — J. M. 

Gwin. 

Gym. Director — Prof. S. G. No- 
ble. 

The following fraternities have 
active chapter: Kappa Alpha. 
Kappa Sigma and Pi Kappa Al- 
pha. The Phi Delta fraternity, 
local, and Kappa Mu, local sor- 
ority. 



calling. We congratulate the slow 
but sure Sharborough. and we feel 
sure that he has the thanks of 
the student body for unravelling 
so deep and impenetrable mystery. 



When clothes are soiled 
Hav e them boiled 



Get Eizzy 
Ring Izzy 



night for such a criminal and House, where I was assured the 
atrocious proceedings. A desper- malicious criminals lav. God 
ate gale was thundering and a wot my amazement when before 
cold sleet of tempestuous rain was our beloved President's house I 
rocking Dr. Sullivan In the sweet viewed, (through Sceptical eyes, 
slumbers of sleep. Tne heavens residing at a gracious angle upon 
flashed with the fiery bolts of the front porch of so aged and 
Jove, while Morpheus was casting venerable a man, one wheel of the 
its spell up the campus and all lamented buggy. My eonstitu- 
lay quiet, save for the occasional tion and nerves, (I, being, by na- 
snore3 of Dr. Aekland, which ture, of a very nervous tempera- 
were wafted hither and thither ment anyhow), could stand no 
like the mournful wails of a Jew- more. I would not contaminate 
ish graveyard. my soul by viewing any longer 

Mr. Thomas Lowry Bailey, lo- such a disgraceful a proceeding, 
cal representative of Pinkerton As I threw my hands to my eyes 
Detective Bureau, relates his and ran frantically towards my 
views and experiences in the fol- residence I muttered, “The sins Neatly and Accurately Executed, 
lowing heartrending words, which the children unto the third and SPECIAL RATES to STUDENTS 
are selected from his private di- the children unto the third and a. L. CHAMBERS, 
ary: fourth generation of them that Residence ’Phone 1208. 

“Arising at the hour of seven- hate me,” and instantly uttered Jackson :::::: Miss. 

thirty, I dressed myself with a prayer for the next generation, ! 

great haste and care in order to hoping likewise that they would 
get, as soon as possible my usual not be a generation of vipers in a 
fresh air exercise before breaking den of iniquity. 



Jackson Steam Laundry. 

PHONE 730 



TYPEWRITING 



GO TO- 



my fast, 
sweetest. ” 



For then nature is 



Afterwards, through painful 
tribulation and egregious aug- 



JACKSON MERCANTILE 



COMPANY. 



And what is so rare as a day in mentive discursiveness, I found f or Fancy Groceries and all kinds 



June, 

Then, if ever, come perfect days 



of Feed Stuffs. Same quality at 



that the body of the buggy was 
placed at the northwest corner 
And heaven tries earth if it be in 0 f t' n ,, campus, while each of the lower prices.. Prompt deliverty is 
t lme > i four wheels w-ere scattered on all | 

And over it softly her warm ear parts of the grounds. I imme- ( our 
lav 3 ” diatelv wired what I could gather 

J » j 

and deduce to the Bureau in New i 
I was strolling along, my arms ^ 



gently clasped behind me, inhal- 
ing sweet drafts of pure ozone and 



It is not our purpose to cast 



E. H. GALLOWAY, M. D. 
Century Building. 
Jackson, Miss. 



giving thanks to Providence for suspicion on any of the honorable 
my safe deliverance from such a members of the faculty, but we 



horrible night, my tranquil medi- 



Sidelights 



from the 
Bureau. 



fear that unless we go a little fur- 
! tations being neither marred nor ther and reveal the discoveries of 
ruffled by storm or tempest. But the Detective, R. B. Sharbor- 
alas, my sweet concept of Na- ough. appointed by Pinkerton. rpasona ^j e 
' ture ’s gifts were suddenly brought we would leave a gloom on the 

fair names of the facultv. Ow-i Nice line of Stationery on hand 



G. W. SISTRUNK 

Handles all Kinds of 

Good things to eat. 

Goods always fresh and prices] 



Conglomerate night, that ha'lu- to an abrupt end, for as I ap- 
cination swept from early mom proaehed Dr. Sullivan’s buggy- i»g only to the peculiar skill of 
past dewev eve. That all uncon- , house, and as I viewed a heart the detective ..$aia,ogd ia..ai$$ 
seious lay absolved. Continue rending sight, my heart was fill- finally run to ground and we hope 
thou this too uncanny part of ed with ire and indignation. I that, regardless of these days of 
darkened despotism. What means could not control my effervescing mauldin excuses and pliable ex- 
a noxious cancantation of adapt - 1 emotions which gave vent to a ecutives. the law may arise and 
ibility. What men so disposed malicious sacrilege. “Dern.”For sentence the guilty parties three 



Give him a trial 



could fair resist alleviation of this reclining within that consecrated days board at the shacks. We 
sundry coil. W T ho, when they shed were two chairs which, up understand that “Black Hand 
knew not why ’twas so; said lead on closer examinations proved to league” has existed on the eam- 
us that we may unfold the mys-jbe Dr. Murrah’s rocking chair pus for several months, but have 
teries of a transient thought so and Dr. Sullivan’s lecture chair, never been discovered and prob- 
intermingled with ethereal senti- j Miserable Dietu. Suddenly and ably would never have, had it not 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 
College Photographer. 



Jackson, 



Miss. 



Capitol St., near Bridge. 



ment and guarded well their her- like a thunderbolt it came upon been for the eagle- eye of Shar- 



mitage from earthly care and pre- ' me that Dr. James Magruder borough. We understand that 



monition. Consequently, on the Sullivan’s buggy was missing. I this league is led by no other per- 
night. of January 29th, on the cried unto myself “Oh, the infamy sonage than the illustrious Frank 

campus of Millsaps College, a ter- of such a deed.” I produced my Starr Williams. He has an able 

rible crime, which has up till the note book and carefully, through gang of cut throars to follow 
writing of this article, baffled the tear stained eyes, took word for him in the personality, of the fol- 
Pinkerton Detective Bureau and word what I saw. Finally I lowing men : Mark Guinn, An- 

all the genius of the country was streered my course straight for derson. Alford. Duke and many 

perpetrated. So it was an ideal Shack No. 2 and the Cooper more following the ministerial 



WHEN DOWN TOWN 

Drop in at 

Your Old Friend’s Fountain, 
BOTH HOT and COLD DI 
J. S. MANGUM, 

At Hunter & McGee’s. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Jackson, Miss. 

Millsaps College offers courses lead in^ 
to two decrees: B. A & B. S. 

For Catalogue, address 

W. B MURRAH, Fres. 



— 






THE PURPLE AND- WHITE 



QUAE FI ANT, EX HOC COGNOSCES. 



Volume I. Jackson, Mississippi, March 5, 1909. Number 9. 



ATHLETICS. 

This has been a great week for 
[ athletics in general and especially 
| for outdoor sports. And, indeed, 
I it seems to have appealed to the 
I boys for never have they shown 
I more interest. A great wave 
b seems to have swept the whole 
L campus arousing interest not only 
I in one or two phases but in every 
! line — track, tennis, baseball and 
I gymnasium. You can see groups 
I everywhere at the same time — 
I some on the baseball field, some 
I in the gymnasium, others at bas- 
| ket-ball, while still others are seen 
ft in running suits competing for 
I the dashes and jumps. 

Track Work. 

► In fact more interest has been 
1 shown along the line of track 
I work than any other line. Sev- 
I eral new contestants appeared on 
I the spot about two days ago and 
I the old heroes faded into the baek- 
I ground. Some fine records were 
Pf made, considering the fact that 
I training has just begun. So far 
I Peeples has the hundred yard 
I dash, making the distance in 
K about eleven seconds. He has the 
I 220 yards dash also, covering that 
I distance in about thirty seconds. 
I Carson holds the lead in standing 
I- broad, running broad and running 
I high jump, he having cleared the 
'I bar at fifty-five inches; jumped 

■ nine feet standing; and having 

■ defeated gravitation for eighteen 
1 leet in the running broad. 

Gymnasium. 

The interest in gymnasium work 
I has grown of late and prospects 
[ now are good for an excellent 
I team by field-day. The boys can- 

I I not do justice to themselves or 
their instructor, thougii, as long 
J as they have to use sue’h equip- 
I ment as the gym is fitted with at 
5 present. It would not cost much 
to put it in perfect repair and, 
surely, the Athletic Association 
can spare a little money that will 
bring so large returns as that. 

Baseball. 

Our prophesies along the base- 
I ball line are being realized. The 
. I boys are getting in trim now and 
I- reveal more and mote good quali- 
•jtes each day. This was shown 
•to '-treat extent in a hot contest 



Tuesday evening between the 
Freshmen and “Preps.” 

The Preps snowed good form 
all through the game and are, in- 
deed, matches for the Freshmen, 
being defeated only- Dy hard luck. 
Rankin pitched a slendid game, 
allowing only two hits. His sup- 
port was on the whole very good 
but a few costly errors cost his 
team the game. 

Carlisle began the twirling for 
the Freshmen and pitched a good 
game as long as he lasted but the 
strain was too great on him so, 
after allowing one hit, he was re- 
lieved by Therrell. who finished 
the game without allowing a sin- 
gle hit. 

It was an exciting game from 
start to finish — in fact the best 
that has been played on the col- 
lege diamond this year. The line- 
up was as follows : 



Freshmen — Therrell, p. ; Car- 
lisle, p. ; Holmes, c. ; Russum, lb. ; 
Morse, 2b.; Collins, 3b.; Huntley, 
ss. ; Brabston, If. ; Ryals, rf. ; Con- 
verse, cf. 

Preps— Rankin, p. ; Smith, c. ; 
McCoy, lb. ; Rush, 2b. ; Williams, 
3b.; Peeples, ss. ; Johnson, If.; 
Bratton, rf. ; Stennis, If. 

Score 5-2 in favor of Freshmen. 



From the Manager. 

The series of class baseball 
games will begin on or before the 
22nd of March. In order to make 
this series interesting and excit- 
ing from the beginning it is essen- 
tial that each class manager have 
his men practicing daily for the 
next two weeks. We have here 
ample material for four good class 
teams and with the necessary 
practice we feel sure that the ar- 



ticle of ball furnished on our cam- 
pus will be such that even the 
cut and dried fans in our student 
body will be content with occupy- 
ing standing room at our games 
in preference to shading a seat in 
the bleachers at League Park. 

Get busy fellows and land your 
class on top. Do not be discour- 
aged, ye stars, because your home 
runs will not be commented upon 
in the sporting sections of our 
great dailies, but remember that 
if you play the game as earnestly 
and energetically as you would if 
you were working for a place on 
a Varsity nine the chances are 
that you will at least have the 
satisfaction of seeing your class 
numerals on the championsnip 
pennant. 

Get in the game for all you are 
worth and we will have first-class 
baseball in spite of every obstacle 



placed in our path by the powers 
that be. 



Law Notes. 

Heretofore the law class has 
contributed very little if anything 
to any of the college publications. 
But since we feel a deep interest 
in these various college organs we 
naturally have a desire to let 
others know what we are doing in 
the interest and welfare of both 
ourselves and college. 

The class as a wnole has been 
at work in earnest as Is well 
shown by their ready and intel- 
ligent discussions of subjects 
brought before them. These dis- 
cussions are of added interest on 
Friday nights when we meet at 
our moot courts. Four of the 
class are selected as attorneys who 
must prepare and conduct the 



case as would be required in reg 
ular court. Our judge is gener- 
ally a practising lawyer in the 
city, but if we fail to secure such 
one, we select a member of the 
class to preside. 

Besides deriving much useful 
knowledge from being an active 
attorney in these courts, we find 
them very entertaining from the 
standpoint of an onlooker. Who 
would not be interested (espe- 
cially a member of the law class 
who had not paid his tuition) in 
a suit brought by the college to 
collect tuition from one of the 
students? Or, who would not be 
interested when Jesse Haley, Jr., 
was on trial or murder and the 
prosecuting attorney after acquit- 
tal charged the defense with 
having bribed the jury? 

The most famous suit tried be- 
fore our court was the above suit 
brought in behalf of the college 
for the collection of tuition. In 
this suit a prominent member of 
the class had failed to settle his 
tuition and the boys found cause 
of action before our court. On 
the night of the trial our proposed 
judge failed to turn up so nat- 
urally the attorneys in the case 
selected two members of the class 
to preside, Avaiving the jury for 
he case. 

Af ter a heated discussion of all 
the points in the case the court 
found for the defendant. On sub- 
sequent developments it turned 
out that the presiding judge had 
not paid his tuition. 



Are You Guilty Co-Eds? 

Her lips he kissed, 

And cried, “Oh, bl!3s!” 
The maiden hissed 
“You’ll pay. for this!” 

She spoke the truth. 

His fatal frolic 
Laid low the youth 

—Ex. 



“To kiss the Miss you ought to 
kiss 

Is not to kiss a Miss amiss; 

But to kiss the Miss you ought to 
miss 

And to miss the Miss you ought 
to kiss. 

Is to kiss a Miss amiss. ” 

— Index. 



The Annual Revival 

BEGINS 

T uesday, March 9 th 

Faculty and Students are 
Expected to Attend 





THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



The Purple and White 

Published Weekly by the Junior 

Class of Millsaps College 

ROBT. H. RUFF .... Editor-In-Chief 
E. C. BREWER .... Associate Editor 
A. B. CAMPBELL .... Athletic Editor 
MISS MARGARET SAUMS . Social Editor 
D. R. WASSON .... Y. M. C. A. Editor 

JOHN GASS Local Editor 

W. E. PHILLIPS Loca Edi tor 

M. L. NEILL Business Mgrr 

A. F. KELLY .... Assistant Bus. Mgr 

All matter for publication should be ad- 
dressed to the Editor-in-Chief. 

All business communications should be ad- 
dressed to the Business Mgr., M. L. Neill. 



Entered as seacond class matter January 22, 
1909, at the postoffice at Jackson Miss., 
under act of Congress, March, 3,il879 

Single Copy Per Annum 50 Cents 
Two Copies Per Annum 75 Cents 

EDITORIAL. 



Learning to Speak in Public. 

The art of public speaking is to 
be learned as any other — by study 
and practice. The less one de- 
pends on natural gifts and the 
more he relies on persistent effort, 
the better the results. Indeed, 
natural gifts seem often to be a 
drawback to achievement. Had 
not Demosthenes labored under an 
impediment in his speech he 
doubtless never would have made 
the orator he became; and Phil- 
lipps Brooks, who was advised by 
a professor who felt great inter- 
est in his future, not to try to 
make a public speaker, became 
one of the most famous orators 
in America. 

Every American citizen should 
learn to express his thoughts in 
public with some degree of readi- 
ness. He owes it to himself and 
to his country to be able, not only 
to form, but on occasion, to ex- 
press opinions on public affairs. 

The college student who fails to 
cultivate the art and habit of pub- 
lic speaking loses an important 
part of the benefit of college train- 
ing. To allow timidity or indiffer- 
ence to prevent him from taking 
part in all contests where words 
are the instruments of war is to 
forfeit a high privilege and to 
play the coward where courage is 
the test of manliness. Indeed the 
cpllege student who avoids de- 
bating handicaps his future career 
and courts embarrassment through 
life. 

It is indeed an admirable at- 
tainment to be able duly to esti- 
mate the relative importance of 
the several duties and privileges 
of our lives. To know just where 
and how strongly today the em- 
phasis is as important in the art 



of living as in the art of reading 
or speaking. Many a life has been 
marred or rincd by misplacing the 
emphasis in its earlier years. It 
is folly to pay too much for a whis- 
tle. Students should use all priv- 
ileges according to their proper 
intention, and broaden college ed- 
ucation by partaking of all the 
good things in reach as far as 
practicable. 

All great educational institu- 
tions encourage public speaking 
and debating mong their students, 
as a means not only of strength- 
ening and training the mental 
powers, but also of fixing and 
utilizing the knowledge required 
by study. 

The general neglect of the prac- 
tice of declamation is a serious 
defect in the public schools of our 
country. Hence most of the youths 
who enter our colleges are utter- 
ly unprepared to organize and 
maintain such debating associa- 
tions a 3 should be the honor and 
the armament of every college. 

If you do nothing more than get 
rid of the sense of embarrassment 
in standing up before your fellow 
citizens, your efforts at debate are 
by no means unprofitable. Delib- 
erative assemblies are the vitaliz- 
ing element in American institu- 
tions, and no man is properly 
qualified for citizenship who is 
not prepared to take part in them. 

W. L. C. Hunnicutt. 



Y. M. C. A. 



The volunteer band was glad to 
have with them on Thursday 
evening Dr. Lambuth, a returned 
missionary from China, also Dr. 
McCullough from the training 
school of Nashville and Dr. Car- 
penter of the First Methodist 
Church. Jackson. Dr. Lambuth 
told some of the many experiences 
that he had while in China and 
Japan, and spoke of the great 
need for more efficient workers. 
It is very encouraging to the band 
to have these worthy men meet 
with them and advise them as to 
how to live and the best plans to 
follow in pursuing their life work. 
Dr. McCullough invited them all 
to come and take a course at his 
training school. He included 
among the many other benefits to 
be had there that it was a “pretty 
good place to find a help-mate.” 
Mr. Brown addressed the Asso- 
ciation Friday night on the sub- 
ject of prayer. This wa3 a very 



appropriate subject, since prayer 
is the one essential thing in the 
few days preeeeding the revival 
as well as during the services. He 
urged u;> to take time to pray, not 
merely to say our prayers, but to 
get in real communion with God. 
He showed us what a power we 
could be for good if we vr 0 uld 
only get in the right relationship 
with God. He said that Christ 
spent much time in prayer and 
that if it was necessary for him to 
pray to overcome temptation and 
to accomplish his purpose, how 
much more is it necessary for us 
to spend time in prayer. 

The attendance Sunday night 
was good. The service was led 
by Mr. Guinn, who talked on the 
subject of “The Value of Pure 
Thought.” He showed us the im- 
portance of keeping our minis 
clear of impure thoughts. That 
it is only through pure thoughts 
that we grow intellectually, spir- 
itually and to a certain extent 
physically. We need to cultivate 
our thoughts in order to broaden 
our lives and make them more 
useful to us and to others as well. 

The revival services are to be- 
gin March 9th. Tney will be con- 
ducted by Mr. Harbin, with Mr. 
Guiee assistant. These men are 
said to be very fine workers with 
young men. We trust that great 
good will be accomplished through 
their work and direction. Let us 
all put our shoulders to the wheel 
and begin the work. We have 
now the greatest opportunity for 
doing something for Christ that 
we will ever have, so let us take 
advantage of it. We should at- 
tend the prayer services that are 
being held every night. It will 
help to get the burden of souls 
more on our hearts, so that we 
will work with greater interest. 

Don’t forget to come to the 
business meeting tonight, as the 
officers are to be elected for the 
coming year. It is important that 
you should be on hand and help 
in the selection. 

Mr. J. S. Duke will lead Sunday 
night. His subject is “Why Men 
Remain in Sin.” 



Last Friday evening the Misses 
Park were hostesses at a delight- 
ful chafing dish party in honor of 
their friend, Miss Dickson. Only 
a few friends were present to en- 
joy this occasion, the fortunate 
ones being Messrs. C. G. Terrell, 
L. M. Blount, W. E. Phillips and 



C. C. Hand. Several games of 
“forty-two” were played, after 
which the young ladies made 
fudge. Every one present enjoy- 
ed the entire evening as such in- 
formal occasions with such charm- 
ing hostesses are always long re- 
membered. 



Rules of Conduct. 

1. Pull not thy brother’s ears 
while in classroom, neither before 
nor after the lesson. 

2. Give not thyself up to 
slumber while the conscientious 
“Prof.” is trying to expound the 
lesson. 

3. Wear not green hats — 
neither disfigure thy hat by draw- 
ing upon it unseemly likenesses 
nor encircle it with loudly tinted 
hat bands which detract from the 
appearance of sard hat. 

4. Giggle not out in class at 
things that amuse thee — rather 
swallow thy handkerchief. 

5. Scream not in the Lab. If 
thou art in imminent danger of 
being blown up, remove thyself 
with all due expediency from the 
room not creating unnecessary 
disturbances. 

6. Move not thy tongue an 
inch within thv head while in the 
library for verily, sooner or later 
thou wilt be handed over to the 
tender mercies of the librarian. I 
speak with the wisdom that only 
experience brings. 

7. Whosoever weigheth 12o 
pounds or over sit not on the arms 
of the library chairs for they will 
surely break off. and woe to the 
one that breaketh them. 

8. Cut not thy hair short in 
the back, leaving an abominable 
tuff in front, for verity thou art 
in danger of being mistaken for 
Father Time, yea, and getting 
twitched by that same “forelock.” 

9. Wear not merry widow 
hats in classroom through merci- 
ful consideration of those wno sit 
behind thee. 

10. FLIRT NOT h 1 That is. 

when thou lookest upon one of 
thy classmates close not one eye- 
lid farther than the other, raise 
not one eyebrow higher than the 
other nor elevate thy nose, for the 
committing of any one of the 
aforesaid things would be flirting. 

Freshman— Pick that splinter 

out from under my nail. 

Senior— What have yota been 
doing? Scratching yor head?- 
Central Collegian. < 



PUBPLE AND WHITE 



Another marriage of especial in- 
terest to onr students was solemn- 
ized on February 24th, when Miss 
Ruth Sims became the bride of 
Mr. Robert S. Warren. The wed- 
ding was' a very quiet home event, 
only the members of the two fam- 
ilies being present to witness the 
nuptials. Promptly at 8 -.30 o ’clock 
Miss Sims, even more radiant than 
usual in her lovely visiting gown 
and carrying a sheaf boquet of 
white carnations, entered the par- 
lor with the man of her choice. 
Here they were met by Rev. W. 
F. Yarborough, who heard their 
vows and invoked God’s blessing 
upon the onion. 

After the solemn rites were 
over Mrs. Sims, the bride’s moth- 
er, served an elegant lunch to the 
newly married pair and their 
guests. Mr. and Mrs. Warren did 
iot take an extended bridal trip 
but will spend their honeymoon 
in their lovely new suburban 
home. 

The bride is the eldest daughter 
of Dr. and Mrs. W. S. Sims. She 
has long been a favorite in Jack- 
son where she has made her home 
since childhood. She is a very 
charming and attractive young 
woman who finds friends where- 
ever she has acquaintances.. Dur- 
ing the session of 1906 and ’07 
Miss Sims was a student of onr 
college where she held the hon- 
ored position of president of the 
Junior class. 

Mr. Warren is a prosperous 
young business man of Jackson. 
We congratulate him for the prize 
he has won and extend to both 
our most sincere good wishes for 
a bright and happy future 



Galloway Literary Society. 

With a litele better than a 
quorum, the Galloway men met 
Friday evening and the usual rou- 
tine was the order of proceedure 
for the meeting. To our disap- 
pointment, the declaimer and the 
orator were not present, and only 
two of the regular debaters show- 
ed their loyalty in attendance. 
Accordingly President Stennis fill- 
ed out the mining .placets and 
the question: “Resolved, That the 
prosperity of Cuba depends on her 
annexation to the United States, 
was creditably defended by J. M. 
Morse, Raper and Mitchell, who 
succeeded in producing stronger 
argument than Alford, H. A. Sten- 
nis and Brown. The irregular de- 
bate was upheld by Mayfield on 



the affirmative and Frizell on the 
negative. Here the points brought 
out by the negative speaker, in 
the eyes of the society, seemed 
strongest, and the result was a 
reversal of the previous decision. 
The question for the impromptu 
debate was a rather peculiar but 
interesting one. Mr. Beasley, on 
the negative, succeeded in con- 
vincing the society that Mr. Rew’s 
argument in favor of married 
men being more immoral than un- 
married men was not as weighty 
and effective as that he presented. 
We are glad to acknowledge that 
great interest was evmced by the 
participants in this latter argu- 
ment and we caution our mem- 
bers to iterate this so as to have 
a live society. The program, in 
general, was very good and good 
interest was shown by those pres- 
ent.. Mr. Mayfield was chosen 
monthly orator and the following 
question was adopted for two 
weeks hence: “Resolved, That the 
Governor’s power to pardon 
should be restricted. 



Lamar Literary Society. 

The program for Friday night 
was the most interesting that has 
been rendered for several months, 
it was even interesting enough for 
the “Galloways” to listen to. The 
question for the regular weekly 
debate was: “Resolved, That Mis- 
sissippi Should have a Compulsory 
Education Law.” The debaters 
for the affirmative were Messrs. 
Bailey, Stuart and Donnell; for 
the negative, Messrs. Smith, F. B. 
Scott and C. E. Johnson. Although 
all three debaters on affirmative 
were extemporaneous neverthe- 
less they put up an excellent ar- 
gument and the question was 
given to them. Very much ex- 
citement was created when Presi- 
dent Mullins gave out for extem- 
poraneous debates the question: 
“Resolved, That It Is Better to 
Live Single Than Married,” and 
put “Jake” Bingham first on the 
affirmative. Although “Jake” is 
now engaged he did his very best 
and in conclusion he suggested to 
the president that he could have 
done much better if he had been 
on the negative side. Surely no 
better debater than Bishop Rainey 
could have been placed first on 
the negative. He brought out 
some very strong points. As the 
second on the affirmative G. C. 
Clark acquitted himself with hon- 
or. every one knows that G. C. is 



a born bachelor. Little Johnnie 
Gass No. 6 was the one who made 
the second speech tor the nega- 
tive. Johnnie believes in marry- 
ing and all he wants is a chance. 
Had it not been for Miss Edith 
McLuer, one of Lamar’s honorary 
members, the vote tor the nega- 
tive would have been unanimous. 
We were very sorry to see Miss 
McLuer cast her ballot in thi3 
direction, for it entirely eliminates 
Henry Frizell from matrimonial 
circles. 



The February number of the 
Collegian did manage to come out 
on the 2nd of March and we are 
glad to get the magazine while its 
articles are still new. The issue 
is on the whole very good, the 
stories being interesting and the 
various departments well written 
up. 

The first story “Dried Butter 
Flies,” is a very good little love 
story. The plot. although not 
deep, is well eveloped, and our 
only objection to it is the apparent 
inconstancy of the heroine. 

“The Haunted Hause” is very 
interesting. The plot itself is ex- 
cellent material for a story and its 
treatment is deserving of much 
credit. The descriptions, both of 
the house itself and the aged 
Spaniard are very vivid and fur- 
nish a splendid setting for the 
story. 

“A Fortunate Mistake.” has a 
very interesting plot also, one 
which holds the reader’s atten- 
tion throughout. The conversa- 
tional style in which it is written 
is a pleasing change from the 
usual form. 

“The Easy Chair” is a catchy 
and original article on Jackson 
and the campus in areneral. It’s 
being written in the form of a 
letter to a classmate by an alum- 
nus of long ago gives it a neat 
setting and permits the writer to 
draw comparisons between the 
campus at present and in the past. 
A few “knocks” are noticeable 
but none are of an offensive na- 
ture. We would be glad to see 
more such original articles in our 
magazines. 

The editorial for this month is 
on the M. I. 0. A. It briefly states 
the purpose of the institution ex- 
horting the students to do their 
part at the contest. It is filled 
with enthusiasm throughout and 
is just such an article as is worthy 
a Millsaps publication. 



The exchange department also 
deserves creditable mention. The 
criticisms of the various college 
magazines are close and impartial 
and the clippings, although few, 
are well selected. We should be 
glad, however, to find more jokes 
and catchy poetry in this depart- 
ment. 

The local department of the 
Collegian for February is sadly 
lacking. 

The alumni department is well 
edited but there is little news 
since so few of our old students 
have visited the campus during 
the past month. The suggestions 
to the alumni concerning interest 
in the affairs of their alina mater 
are very timely. 

The Y. M. C. A. department is 
given over entirely to an article 
by the retiring president. It is a 
very good discussion of what a 
Y. M. C. A. president should be. 

The work of the athletic editor 
is of course endorsed by the “Pur- 
ple and White.” He presents his 
plea for intercollegiate athletics in 
a clear and forceful manner never 
once losing hope of final victory. 
His arguments in favor of “home 
athletics,” or rather inter-class 
games, tennis tournaments and 
track team work are able and con- 
vincing. 



A Dire Mishap. 

A dreadful catastrophe occurred 
Tuesday morning during the 
Sophomore chemical labratory pe- 
riod. The editor of the Purple 
and White is offering a prize to 
the man who will, in an article of 
fifty words, write the most pathet- 
ic and heart-rending account of 
this singular incident. Davies had 
just succeded in securely conceal- 
ing a small lump of the fiery metal 
phosherous in his pocket, when 
he began to smoke and burn. 
Many Sophomores at this tragic 
moment were seen to flee in every 
direction as they feared that he 
might in some respect be connect- 
ed indirectly with the land of hy- 
drogen sulphide and sulphuretted 
hydrogen. Tom Phillips, however, 
was the hero of the uccasion. He 
was seen to rush to the side of 
the much alarmed victim of Dr. 
Sullivan’s labratory and do some 
spectacular work in saving his 
friend from the cruel flames. They 
say that the Jackson fire depart- 
ment is trying very h.rd to secure 
his services, and wish L'm to sign 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 




The Best Shoe 

for a College Boy is the 

HOWARD AND FOSTER 
$3 50 and $4 00 

Guaranteed to be as good as any 
other Shoe costing $5.00 or less. 

We are always glad to accommo- 
date Millsaps College boys when- 
ever we can. 

Come to see us. 

TATOM SHOE CO. 

H?. C. ipepper 

feaberEasftet 

anti 

Matter 

523 EAST CAPITOL STREET 

Full Line Suit Cases and Bags 
Fine Tailoring is Our Specialty 

Phone 1002 Jackson, Miss. 



GOTO 




M Refreshments 

EAT AT HIS 



RESTAURANT. 

Don’t Fail To See Him 
Before Having Your 
Receptions. 

Phone 201. 502 E. Capitol St. 



a twenty year contract as a fire 
fighter. 

All contestants for the prize 
will hand in their papers to Bob 
Ruff before this edition of the 
Purple and White is published. 



LOCALS. 

The first of the month is here — 
look out for the hill collectors! 

What about a holiday on April 
1st? Whatever you do, don’t be 
a fool! 

Mr. A. B. Campbell has been 
at home during the past week on 
account of illness. 

Can any one tell why “Hand- 
some Hump ’ Campbell ; is looking 
so down and out this week? 

We will have the election of the 
Y. M. C. A. officers Friday night, 
March 5, 1909. 

Sunday afternoon Dr. Murrah 
delivered an address at the city 
Y. M. C. A. building. 

The Bobanhela goen to the press 
next Saturday. All pictures must 
be in by then. 

Gann Johnson said, “Why, it 
would have been a sin for a man 
to miss a show like 'Polly of the 
Circus.’ ” 

Mr. T. B. Reed, who is repre- 
senting the Strauss Tailoring Co., 
was at Founders’ Hall Saturday 
with his new spring samples. 

Mr. Joe Henry Morris and Mr. 
Ford Bufkin have been confined 
to their rooms for the past few 
days on account of measles. 

It was once considered immoral 
to be in debt. We would certainly 
be an immoral set of boys if this 
theory was in existence at present. 

Mr. W. E. Hays, of Durant, paid 
his friends and clubmates a flying 
visit Wednesday night on his way 
home from mardt gras at New 
Orleans. 

We are almost having spring 
weather. That feature i3 very 
good but it won’t be long before 

we have those mosquitoes 

again. 



It is rumored that Ruth Grey is 
going to return very soon. I 
wouldn’t be surprised if Crisler, 
Campbell and Bally don’t pay her 
a visit. 

Dr. Wamsley informed us Tues- 
day morning that he is going to 
take the Junior and Senior history 
classes to Natchez at an early date 
for historical purposes. 

Mrs. Sullivan is very anxious to 
know who stole the cake out of 
her pantry last Saturday night. 
Suspicion rests at present on 
Legett and Tom Stennis. 

Prof. McCulloch, director of the 
Vanderbilt Training School of 
Missions, delivered an interesting 
lecture Friday afternoon in the Y. 
M. C. A. hall to the volunteer 
students. 

Mr. Brooks, of the Senior class, 
has been quite ill. He is much 
better at present and his many 
friends will be glad when he is 
strong enough to begin his class 
work again. 

Several of the boys called to 
see their old friend, Mr. Will H. 
Crane, Saturday night. Bill is 
the same good natured funny old _ 
cuss, and is especially amusing in 
“Father and the Boys.” 

Rew. Russum and “Hnmp” 
Campbell have recently been in- 
itiated into the order of the B. 
P’s. However, we wouldn’t ad- 
vise you to mention the fact to 
them. 

John Gass and Prof. Welch are 
asked to be more vindictive in 
the modus operandi of their pedal 
integriments while beating hasty 
retreats from the proximity of the 
science department. 

Doctor — Pat, what are you hold- 
ing that dying man’s nose for?” 

Pat — Sere, to keep his breath 
from leaving him. — College Echo. 



Prof. Swartz, of Millsaps Col- 
lege, has returned from New Or- 
leans where he attended a meet- 
ing of the Classical Association 
of the Middle West and South. 
He read one of the most import- 
ant papers considered by the Asso- 
ciation and was elected vice presi- 
dent for Mississippi. — Clarion- 
Ledger. 

When clothes are soiled 
Have them boiled 

Get Eizzy 

Ring Izzy 

Jackson Steam Laundry. 

PHONE 730 



GO TO 

JACKSON MERCANTILE 
COMPANY. 

for Fancy Groceries and all kinds 
of Feed Stuffs. Same quality at 
lower prices. . Prompt deliverty is 
our motto. 

G. W. SISTRUNK 

Handles all Kinds of 

Good things to eat. 

Goods always fresh and prices 
reasonable . 

Nice line of Stationery on hand 
Give him a trial 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 
College Photographer. 

Jackson, 

Miss. 

Capitol St., near Bridge. 



WHEN DOWN TOWN 

Drop in at 

Your Old Friend’s Fountain, for 
BOTH HOT and COLD DRINKS 
J. S. MANGUM, 

At Hunter A McGee’s. 



Telephone 8 — 

Majestic Restaurant. 

Modern — up-to-date 

Solicits your patronage 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Jackson, Hiss. 

Millsaps College offers courses leading 
to two degrees: B. A & B. S. 

For Catalogue, address 

W. B. MURRAH, Pres. 




Bats, Gloves, 



Shoes ar|d 
Uniforixjs. 

Eyrich & Co. 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 





QUAE FIANT, EX HOC COGNOSCES. 


— 


Volume I. 


Jackson, 


Mississippi, March 12, 1909. 


Number 10. 


ATHLETICS. 

Preps, vs. Jackson High School. 

The Jaekson High School team 


Wordsworth, e. 2 0 
Sweeney, p. . . . 3 ) 

Myers, p 2 0 

Manship, If. ...1 C 
Quin, lb 2 0 


<> 1 y 1 Freshmen — Kirkland, lb.; 

0 1 9 Morse. 2b.; Thomas, ss. ; Huntley, 

0 2 0 0 3b. ; Rvals. rf. ; Callius, If. ; Car- 

0 9 19 lisle, cf. : Holmes, e. ; Therrell, p. ; 

113 1 Middleton, p. 


illation is rigidly enforced if noth- 
ing else is accomplished during 
the season. The money paid in 
by them will be uused in buying 
balls, bats, etc. Indications are 



went down in defeat before our 
Prep team Saturday afternoon. 
The final score was 10 to 9. and 
it well represented the relative 
strength of the* teams. Several 
hundred rooters and fair fans 
were present to cheer their team 
on to victory. From the time 
Umpire Peeples called “play 
ball” until the last batter was out 
in the ninth inning, the game was 
fast and spirited. In the first in- 
ning the Jackson boys piled up 
four runs, but after that Rankin 
came to himself and pitched a 
clean, steady game, and the team 
behind him showed their confi- 
dence in the star twirler by giving 
h'm excellent support. For Jack- 
son Shields at third was the candy 
kid. He rapped out two long 
hits which netted five bags, and 
accepted four chances without an 
error. Humpfield also played like 
an old leaguer. Dunlap Peeples 
did the receiving for the Preps 
and his work was beyond crit- 
icism. although this was the first 
game for him in that position for 
several seasons. He also wielded 
the willow well and his three-base 
hit in the ninth was a beauty. 
Rankin had such an assortment of 
curves and mixed them so well 
with his speed that fifteen Jack- 
son men fanned the air wildly 
trying to connect with the globule. 
The following box score tells the 
story of the game : 

Preps— AB. H. R. A. PO. E. 

Peeples, c 5 1 1 3 15 0 

Jones, ss 4 0 1 1 0 0 

Stennis. rf 5 1 2 1 0 0 

McCoy, lb 4 1 2 1 6 2 

pPherrell, cf 4 1 2 1 1 0 

Johnson. If 4 1 1 1 2 0 

Williams. 3b. ..4 1 0 0 2 3 

Horse, 2b 4 1 0 2 1 1 

Rankin, p 4 0 1 1 0 2 

Converse, cf . . . 1 0 0 1 0 0 

Jackson — AB. H. R. A. PO. E. 

Rirdsong. If. ...4 0 1 0 0 0 

Morris, ss 5 0 1 1 1 0 

Hunpfield. c.... 5 12 9*1 

Sh’elds. 3b 5 2 2 1 2 0 

aynes. cf 5 1 0 0 1 0 

ool. rf. . 4 0 n 1 1 9 

ee. 2b 2 0 1 0 1 1 

grader. 2b... 2 0 1 0 0 0 



Hits Apportioned — off Rankir 
4. off Sweeny 4. off Myers, 3. 

Three-base Hits — Shields, Pee- 
ples. 

Two-base Hits — Haynes. Shields. 
Struck Out — By Rankin 15. by 
Eweeny 6. by Myers 3. 

Umpire — A. R. Peeples. 

Time, 1 :45. 



Summary : Hits apportioned, 

off Applewhite 2, off Middleton 2, 
Therrell 1; struck out. by Apple- 
white 9. by Therrell 4, by Middle- 
ton 1 ; double plays. Morse to 
Thomas ; base on balls, Thomas, 
Morse 2. Hand 2. Gass; Umpire. 
Ricketts; time, 1.15. 



Where Will Yon 
Spen^^teraity? 

You Have Decided 

This Import Question is under consideration in the 
Y. M. C. A. Hall daily, 12 to 1 p. m. and 7:15 p. in. 
You are invited to attend these services. 

What is Your Decision } . 

Where Will Yon 
Spend Eternity? 



Junior-Senior — Freshman Game. 

The Junior-Senior oaseball team 
demonstrated their superiority 
over the Freshmen Monay after- 
noon in an 8 to 6 game. Apple- 
white was again the hero of the 
occasion while his battery partner 
Brooks was especially strong be- 
hind the bat, whipping them to 
second in a manner that would 
make Johny Kling open his eyes. 
The teams lined up as follows: 

Junior-Senior — Morse, lb. ; Cris- 
ler, rf.; Kelly, 2b.; Hands, cf.; 
Bryan, 3b.; Stennis, it.; Brooks, 
c. ; Applewhite, p. 



Statement From Manager Stennis. 

Manager Stennis has given out 
this statement for publication, 
through his efficient secretary, 
Jesse Marcus Guinn: “Mr. Brown 
will complete the work on the 
athletic field within the next fort- 
night. As soon as the field is 
finished the regular schedule of 
games will begin. There are sev- 
eral men on the class teams who 
have not joined the Athletic Asso- 
ciation. These men must join be- 
fore they play on the athletic 
field with the paraphernalia be- 



that we will have the most suc- 
cessful baseball season in our his- 
tory.” This is indeed a gratify- 
ing report and we hope that Man- 
ager Stennis is correct in his state- 
ment and prophecy. It will be an 
eventf nlday when the first game 
of ball is played on our athletic 
field, and every student and mem- 
ber of the faculty should be pres- 
ent. — 

Attend the Games. 

Since our basebau teams are 
25 per cent better this year than 
ever before, the attendance at the 
games should increase in propor- 
tion. It is a fact that the attend- 
ance i3 rather small compared 
with the number of students in 
college. This should not be.. Our 
boys play a good game of ball 
and give you the very best there 
Is in them, and you are due them 
the courtesy of your presence. 
The players are especially anxious 
to get the co-eds interested in the 
game. If they come to the games 
they will undoubtedly bring a 
score of admirers with them who 
would not be there otherwise. 
Take notice Co-eds. 



Track Work. 

The candidates for the track 
team still work with the ardor 
and enthusiasm that has charac- 
terized them since the team was 
first organized. Manager Welch 
says that he has secured a number 
of handsome prizes to be given 
out on Field Day. 



Enthusiastic Co-Ed. 

Our athletic enthusiasts are glad 
to again welcome to our midst 
Miss Adele Knowles— the most en- 
thusiastic athletic eo-ed Millsaps 
has ever had. She is a born “root- 
er” and knows football and base- 
ball like the veterans of the grid- 
iron and the diamond. 



Gymnasium Team. 

Prof. Noble has announced that 
he will he prepared to give out a 
list of those on the gym team 
within the next few weeks. 

Don ’t fail to boost Field Day. 





! | L 

r ■ ■ *■ ,. * ■ 

The Purple and White 

Published Weekly by the Junior 
Class of Millsaps College 

BOBT. H. BUFF .... Edltor-In-Chl«f 
E. C. BREWER .... Associate Editor 
A. B. CAMPBELL .... Athletic Editor 

MI88 MARGARET SAUMfl .Social Editor 

D. R. WA8BON .... Y. M C. A. Editor 

JOHN GASS Local Editor 

W. E. PHILLIPS Loca Edi tor 

M. L. NEILL Business Mgr 

A. F. KELLY .... Assistant Bus. Mgr 

All matter for publication should be ad- 
dressed to the Editor-in-Chisf. 

All business communications should be ad- 
dressed to the Business Mgr., M. L. Neill. 

Entered as seacond class matter January 22, 
1909, at the postoffice at Jackson Miss., 
under act of Congress, March, 3,. 1879 

Single Copy Per Annum 50 Cents 
Two Copies Per Annum 75 Cents 

EDITORIAL . 



T 

if 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



(Nodding- student waking up) 
—It's in my desk Professor, 1 
wasn’t using it. 



Annual Revival. 

We are now in the midst of our 
annual revival. As we have been 
devoting the greater part of the 
session to our physical and intel- 
lectual growt,h it is now both 
timely and expedient that we 
have a season of spiritual growth. 
To thinking college men, it will 
be unnecessary to call attention to 
the value of this opportunity. 

We are exceptionally fortunate 
in having with ns Messrs. Harbin 
and Guice to conduct our services. 
They are men of consecration and 
experience. But their labors w’ll 
to a great extent be in vain, un- 
less we as the student body sup- 
port them. Don’t be content with 
coming yourself, but interest 
someone else and bring them. 

The faculty ha 3 shortened our 
lessons and periods in order that 
we may take advantage of these 
meetings. For Dm alone we 
should attend the meeting not- 
withstanding the other vital rea- 
sons. Experience has shown that 
a large per cent of the student 
body who leave college without 
taking a definite stand for the 
Christian life, never do so after 
they leave college. 

So there is a tremendous re- 
sponsibility resting upon the 
Christian fellows in college and a 
great opportunity for the un- 
saved. Truly the King’s business 
requires earnest, prayerful work. 



Energy will do anything that 
can be done in this world; and no 
talents, no circumstances, no op- 
portunities will make a man with- 
out- it. — Goethe. 



Professor (translating Latin) — 
tell me where is thy horse ? 



An Eulogy Written On Buried 
Hopes. 

The chapel bell rings the opening 
day; 

Those on time run lightly o’er the 
lea, 

Those shut out home plod their 
weary way, 

And leave the campus to cows 
and me.. 

Now wcome the classes back into 
my sight, 

And all the air is rent with horrid 
“rah ! rah !’s” bold, 

Save where “many ha-ha’s” silent 
flight 

Is to the library’s near-hy fold. 

Within this field, this park, be- 
neath the oak trees’ shade — 

Wnere lie the leaves in many a 
mouldering heap— 

Each in his narrow cell pro tem- 
pore laid 

The blighted hopes of our athletes 
Sleep. 

The breezy call of hope-instilling 
Profs.. 

Whose words inspire the Senior’s 
swell head. 

The Freshman tears, or anger of 
the Sophs, 

No more shall rouse them from 
their lowly bed. 

Oft did the gridiron honors to 
them yield, 

Their noses oft the stubborn globe 
have broke; 

How happy coaches drove their 
team afield, 

How bowed the antagonist be- 
neath their stroke! 

Let not the conference moek their 
useful toil — 

Their hops of glory’s gain de- 
stroy ! 

Mr Middle-age disdainful hear 

The small request of the normal 
hoy. 

The boast of age. the pomp of 
power, 

And all that age or power e’er 

Await alike the inevitable hour, 
gave. 

now forbidden to the brave. 

Nor you, ye preachers, impute to 
us the fault, 

If Millsaps can now no conquer- 
ing banners raise; 



When through long-drawn hours, 
with heavy brain 

In toil unbroken we spend our 
days. >l jsos.-.v 

Can merry laugh, or animated 
talk 

Turn back yesterday that was to- 
morrow ? 

Man’s voice can dying justice 
raise, 

Repeal can soothe sad Justice’s 
sorrow. 

“A CO-ED.” 



Y. M. C. A. 

Air. Welch, our retiring presi- 
dent, addressed us Friday night 
on the qualifications necessary for 
a man to have to be a successful 
Y. M. C. A. officer. His subject 
was very appropriate, as officers 
were to be elected. He impressed 
the men who were to he elected 
of the great responsibility that 
would rest upon them. 

At the business session the fol- 
lowing men were elected to office: 
J. M. Guin, president ; D. R. 
Wasson, vice president; F. S. 
Williams, treasurer, and C. E. 
Johnson, secretary. We hope these 
men will impart new strength to 
the Association, so that it will 
take on new life. 

The Bible study and missionary 
chairmen reported that about half 
the classes were organized and 
running. Men, what is the mat- 
ter? Leaders, I attribute the 
fault to you. You claim that the 
men are not interested. Now of 
course they are not all interested, 
but it is your businesss to get 
them interested. It is very sel- 
dom that a man will refuse to go 
to a Bible study or mission class 
when they are inviteu. The trou- 
ble is. you have not prepared the 
lesson yourself and have not ask- 
ed the class to meet. You are 
letting pass the greatest oppor- 
tunity for service, probably, that 
will ever come to you. Why is it 
that mer will qualified to fill re- 
sponse ole positions in the Associa- 
tion are sc scarce? One reason is 
because the /Jen. who are sup- 
posed to be leaders have neglected 
their duty. We need our men to he 
more effective and how shall we 
make them so ? By teaching them 
to he more conscientious toward 
duty, I would say, would be one 
way to help do this. 

“Why Men Continue in Sin.” — 
This subject was discussed Sun- 
day night by Mr. Duke. He said 
that it was only through the 



mercyof God they wei>. permitted 
to continue in sin. That because 
they- knew he was a merciful God 
and would forgive sin they relied 
upon His goodness and went on 
in sin. Not many men expect to 
he lost. They have faith enough 
in God to believe that He will re- 
ceive them sometime, whenever 
they get ready to come to Him. 

Brothers Harbin and Guice ar- 
rived Tuesday night. Brother 
Harbin gave us a powerful dis- 
course on “The Soul.” He is in- 
deed a consecrated man. We feel 
sure that much good wilt be done 
with him as our director. 



Program of Lamar Literary So- 
ciety for Friday night, March 5, 
1909: . 

Declaimer — .lumper. 

Orator — Carson. 

Debaters — Affirmative. Brooks, 
Stuart, ; Negative : Gass, Kelly. 

Question. Resolved. That the 
education of today tends more to- 
wards a vocation than towards 
the development of the intellect. 

R. J. Mullins, Pres. 

F. W. Wimberly, Secy. 

Program of Galloway Literary 
Society for Friday night, March 
5, 1909: 

Declaimer — C. C. Anderson. 

Orator — D. R. Wasson. 

Question : Resolved, That the 

present qualifications of a juror 
are detrimental to a proper en- 
forcement of the law. 

Debaters — Affirmative : S. S. 

Backstrom, C. G. Terrell. D. H. 
Glass: Negative: Y. L. Terrell. 

Edgar Mayfield, Pope Ramsey. 

T. A. Stennis, Pres. 

H. M. Frizell, Sec’y. 



Read. 

Whoever reads this verse 
Will swear 

So, conscientious one, 

Beware 

And if, perchance you read 
Too far 

You’ll find out what a fool 
You are. 

Still reading! Still you must 
Persist 

Though I’ve warned you of 
Your risk 

Too late! You’ve thrown away 
Your time 

Now hear the purpose of 
My rhyme 

Since in your brain it finds 
A place 

“ Twas written just to fill 
Up space.” 

—Ex. 




ieera and whits skt 



( Social. 

jr - ~ 

Mr. (jfann Johnson was a most 
gracious host oq Friday evening 
last when at his lovely home on 
North Srate street he received his 
Kappa Sigma brothers and sis- 
ters. The house was tastefully 
decorated in the fraternity col- 
ors. Brilliant Kappa Sigma pen- 
nants adorned the walls and hung 
from the arches, while red and 
white carnations with modest as- 
paragus fern carried out perfectly 
the floral part of the color scheme. 

The spacious rooms downstairs 
were thrown open and given over 
entirely to the young people who 
were assembled to share the even- 
ing's pleasure. A lively game of 
queries was enjoyed as a result of 
which Miss Sudie Frantz won the 
first prize wihle Mr. Haley sue 
ceeded in capturing the booby. 

Late in the evening Mr. John- 
son invited, his guests to the din- 
ing room where dainty ices and 
cakes were served. Mrs. S. J. 
Johnson, mother of the young 
host, and Mrs. E. H. Galloway; his 
sister, aided in the entertainment, 
adding much to the pleasure of 
the evening. 

It was not without regret that 
the guests bade their host good 
night. Every one enjoyed the en- 
tire evening and Mr. Johnson may 
be assured that this courtesy will 
linger long in the memories of his 
fortunate friens. 

The cozy home of the Pi Kappa 
Alpha fraternity were the scene 
of a festive occasion on the even- 
ing of the 6th. This occasion was 
a delightful chafing dish party 
given by the local chapter to the 
sisters of their fraternity. Gar- 
net and old gold, the colors which 
stand for this brotherhood, were 
everywhere in evidence and the 
presence of so many happy young 
people made the scene a most at- 
tractive one. 

Everyone entered into the spirit 
of the evening and the young la- 
dies amply demonstrated their cul- 
inary ability by the tempting 
. dishes which they in turn prepar- 
ed and served Who can doubt 
that the boys enjoyed this part 
of the program T 

But even sr.eh pleasures as this 
must have an end. All too soon 
the happy party found that it wa3 
time to leave and it was with 
°rreat reluctance that they bade 
“/air hosts “good night.” 



Sophomores 10, Freshmen 7. 

- r i • .i,U; • : 

In a fast seven-inning game be- 
tween the classes of ’ll and ’12, 
the Sophs convinced the Freshies 
that they put up a better article 
of ball by three decisive points. 
Ricketts was on the firing line for 
the Sophomores and he proved 
to be the ideal “Man of the 
Hour.” His teammates helped 
him on to victory by the free use 
of the stick, connecting with Car- 
lisle’s benders without the least 
difficulty. Holmes, the Freshman 
catcher, was badly off on his base 
throwing. 

Batteries — Sophs: Rickets and 
Bnck : Freshmen : Carlisle, Ther- 
rell and Holmes. 

Umpire — Dick Richard Whita- 
ker. 

Beware of Grafters. 

And it came to pass rnat on the 
5th day of March. 1909, one J. E. 
D. Sullivan paid the dormitory 
boys a visit. Now this gratter 
seemed to be particular about 
stating his business and economic 
proposition. After singling out 
such men in whom he could con- 
fide he secretly stated his propo- 
sition to “Prep” Welch. John 
Crisler and Dan Bufkin. Woe un- 
to the pressing clubs about the 
campus. Lo, what manner of com- 
petition stares you in the face. 
With the said conservative young 
gentlemen patronizing him, sure- 
ly he felt that he would have to 
wire the company to make up an 
extra supply of wire trouser 
pressers. He continued to pro- 
ceed with great tact and diplo- 
macy and instituted Welch, a sen- 
ior of great repute, as secretary of 
the new pressing order. He con- 
tinued. stating the thousands of 
reasons why these w?re stretchers 
were so essential to young college 
men. Even the conservative Buf- 
kin, with a business eye like unto 
that of an eagle, saw that this 
man was of great character, truth 
and learning and worked only in 
the behalf of his three friends. 

Crisler. a deep thinker and far- 
sighted man as he found much 
logic and wisdom in the sayings 
of this man. Welch viewed the 
favorable proposition from the 
point of view that involves his 
duty. 

At present, however, they pro- 
nounce him a thief and liken him 
unto a twentieth century book 
seller, for J. E. D. Sullivan got 
the money, and Welch, Crisler and 



Bufkin got wire trouser pressers 
and experience. 

“Eating Luncheon On Father’s 
Grave.” 

Math is a troublous thing 
Chem is the limit 
One forgets Latin 
In half of a minute. 

Nor do I love to study French? 
Do I my German adore? 

I’d rather be an errand boy 
In a bughouse Chinaman store. 

Psvke doth weary mortal brain 
Greek is for the dummy 
No good unless in Egypt old 
We spraecen zu lin dummy. 

What earthly use to man or beast 
Is trig or analyt. 

I begin to think the beastly junk 
Was written to forgit. 

A. A. Green, Jr. 

LOCALS 

We lpust admit that the “Preps 
don’t prep” when it comes to 
playing baseball. 

The Junior physics class is quite 
anxious to know when that long 
looked for and much talked-of 
visit of the physics class at Bel- 
haven is going to be pulled off. 

Ike Enochs is seen to stroll 
about the campus these days sing- 
ing “When First I Kissed Sweet 
Marguerite.” His spring attack 
is coming rather early in the sea- 
son but we suppose this is due 
to the warm weather. 

One of our business managers 
says that he ha3 two very prom- 
ising assistants — they promise 

everything and do nothing. 

Ed Brewer believes that he can 
produce a sequel to Romeo and 
Juliet that will far surpass the 
original. 

Mr. A. B. Campbell, athletic ed- 
itor of the Purple and White, has 
returned to school after having 
been at home for a week on ac- 
count of sickness. 

Last Monday afternoon one of 
our Sophomore Co-eds refused to 
take notes of Dr. Sullivan. Free- c 
dom of choice is a great thing. i 

i 

To whom do you suppose Dr. 5 
Kern was referring when he said 1 



that you could find a scQr€$Df men 
on the Annual staff who "Appear- 
ed to be busy but who accomplish- 
ed absolutely nothing?” 



Mr. L. Barrett Jones spent sev- 
eral days last week at his home in 
Madison, Miss. 

At the breakfast table several 
mornings ago “Tige" Applewhite 
was relating to h’s friends some 
fond memories of his childhood. 
One remembrance was that he had 
a little horse that was "goosie.” 

Mr. T. K. Faucet of the Pre- 
paratory Department, went home 
last week. 

A high school teacher informed 
a crowd of boys at vne oaseball 
game Saturday afternoon that 
one of her boys was right there 
with the mit on when it came to 
playing football. 

Bro. J. A. Alford thinks so 
much of his Latin pony that he 
has named it Bucephalus. 

At chapel Thursday morning 
Dr. Murrah announced that the 
Sophomores who wished to speak 
at the commencement contest 
would appear before the faculty 
in a preliminary contest on Wed- 
nesday, March 17th. The Fresh- 
men are to speak March 24th. 

Mr. L. M. Blount is confined to 
his bed on account of illness. 

Mark Guinn is sick at present 
with f. bad case of mumps. 

And it happened that on Tues- 
day' morning during the Junior 
chemistry' period a gentle rap was 
heard on the door. The class lis- 
tended with breathless attention 
and heard the awful decree come 
forth that one of our beloved 
members had been summoned to 
appear before the grand jury'. 

If you have a local tell the ed- 
itor about it. 

Mr. J. C. Thomas, of D’Lo, 
Miss., has been visiting his son, 
Mr. W. N. Thomas# who is at 
school here this year. 

Rev. G. N. Guice, wtio graduat- 
ed at Millsaps in 1900. is on the 
campus at present. He is lead- 
ing the singing during the revival 
services, and we are very glad to 
welcome this old alumnus. 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 




The Best Shoe 

for a College Boy is the 

HOWARD AND FOSTER 
$3 50 and $4 00 

Guaranteed to be as good as any 
other Shoe costing $5.00 or less. 

We are always glad to accommo- 
date Millsaps College boys when- 
ever we can. 

Come to see us. 

TATOM SHOE CO. 

tR. C. jpepper 

foaberftasftet 

anb 

Matter 

523 EAST CAPITOL STREET 

Full Line Suit Cases and Bags 

Fine Tailoring is Our Specialty 

Phone 1002 Jackson, Miss. 



(iOTO 




m Refreshments 

EAT AT HS 



RESTAURANT. 

Don’t Fail To See Him 
Before Having Your 
Receptions. 

Phone 201. 502 E. Capitol St. 



When clothes are soiled 
Hav e them boiled 

Get Eizzy 
Ring Izzy 

Jackson Steam Laundry. 

PHONE 730 



If you are not ashamed of your 
visitor phone us. 

Prof. J. N. Powers has accepted 
the honor of being the outside 
speaker at the anniversary of the 
Galloway Literary Society th’s 
year. The date set for the anni- 
versary is the second Friday night 
in April. 



If love is ill 
And passions thrill 

Is of disease quintessence. 

May it be mine 
O. maid divine. 

To know no convalescence. — Ex. 



She — What makes you so for- 
getful ? Evervth’ng I say to you 
seems to go in one ear and out the 
other. 

He — Well, it’s just the other 
way with you. Everything I say 
to you goes in both of your ears 
and comes out of your mouth.’ 
— Ex. 



HEDERMAN 

BROTHERS 

PRINTERS 

PUBLISHERS 

BOOK 

BINDERS 

Cor. Pearl and Congress Streets. 

Jackson, Miss 



The FootePath to Peace. 

To be glad of lire, because it 
gives you the chance to love and 
to work and to play and to look 
up at the stars; to be satisfied 
with your possessions, but not 
contented with yourself until you 
have made the best of them; to 
despise nothing in the woild ex- 
cept falsehood and meanness, and 
to fear nothing except cowardice ; 
to be governed by your amira- 
tious rather than by your dis- 
gusts; to covet nolmng tnat is 
your neighbor’s except his kind- 
ness of heart and gentleness of 
manners; to think seldom of your 
enemies, often of your friends, 
- ry day of Christ; and to 
-pend as much time as you can. 
with body and with spirit, in 
God's out-of-doors — these are lit- 
tle guide-posts on the footpath 
to peace. — Henry van Dyke in 
the “Outlook.” 



The Joy of Work. 

Do not look on your work as a 
dull duty. If you choose, you 
tan make it interesting. Throw 
your heart into it, master its mean 
ing, trace out the causes and pre- 
vious history, consider it in all 
its bearings, think how many 
even the humblest labor may ben- 
efit, and there is scarcely one of 
our duties which we may not 
look to with enthusiasm. You 
will get to love your work, and 
if you do it with delight you will 
do it with ease. Even if at first 
you find this impossible, if for a 
time it seems mere drudgery, 
this may be just what you re- 
quire; it may be good like moun- 
tain air to brace up your char- 
acter. — Lord Avebury. 



Sorrowing souls will be recep- 
tive of words from us who have 
tasted the bitterness of the same 
cup. 



RAZORS 

Honed 1 5e 

.All Work Guard u tetd 

J. S. Duke 



GO TO 

JACKSON MERCANTILE 
COMPANY. 

for Fancy Groceries and all kinds 
of Feed Stuffs. Same quality at 
lower prices. . Prompt deliverty is 
our motto. 

G. W. SISTRUNK 

Handles all Kinds of 

Good things to eat. 

Goods always fresh and prices 
reasonable . 

Nice line of Stationery on hand 
Give him a trial 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 
College Photographer. 

Jackson, 

Misi. 

Capitol St., near Bridge. 



WHEN DOWN TOWN 

Drop in at 

Your Old Friend’s Fountain, for 
BOTH HOT and COLD DRINKS 
J. S. MANGUM, 

At Hunter & McGee’s. 

MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Jackson, Miss. 

Millsaps College offers worses leading 
to two degrees: B A & B. S. 

For Catalogue, address 

W. B. MURR 'H, Pres. 



Tennis Rackets 
Balls and Nets 

Eyrich & Co. 









THE PURPLE AND WHITE 





« 


QUAE FIANT, EX HOC COGNOSCES. 






Volume I. 




Jackson, Mississippi, March 19, 1909. 




Number 11. 



ATHLETICS. 

With only a little baseball now 
and then to break the monotony, 
athletics for the past week has 
been dead — or rather slumbering. 
But now that the weather has 
cleared up again, just watch with 
what a start it will awaken.. With 
leaps and bounds, it will go thun- 
dering down the college highways 
until the entire student body is 
participating once more and it 
will again become the pleasure 
and pastime for our collegians. 



Juniors 8, Preps 7. 



The ball teams representing the 
Junior and Prep classes gave a 
superb exhibition of baseball be- 
fore a large crowd of enthusiastic 
fans Friday afternoon. Stennis, 
in the role of Tyrus Cobb, in right 
field, was the principal show. Well 
did he demonstrate that he had 
the making of a great ball player 
in him. He walks on the diamond 



with the grace and ease of a La- 
joie while he bats like a fiend 
and is lightning on the bases. In 
this man Ty Cobb has a future 
rival for championship honors. I n 
Brooks, the Juniors have found a 
second Johnny Kling. He strikes 
terror deep into the heart of every 
player with base stealing aspira- 
tions. And who can doubt that 
No. 6 John Gass may be termed 
the peer of the great Hans Wag- 
ner — the peerless shortstop and 
heavy hitter of the big leagues. 
Did Wagner ever field a ball fast- 
er, throw more accurately or 
wield the stick better, than this 



future champion — the nifty little 
shortstop of the Juniore. And al- 
though Therrell was a borrowed 
man, he proved to be a veritable 
Bill Donovan, and while he has 
not had the experience of “Wild 
Bill,” he has many ot the quali- 
ties that are characteristic of the 
world’s premier twirl er. 

For the Preps Dunlap Peeples 
was the principal kicker. He 
might well be likened to Hughey 
Jennings when it comes to jawing 
an umpire or disputing a decision. 
He had as close seconds eight 
other men on the team, all thor- 
oughly competent and wound up 
for two hours at a time. But 
such is the nature of Preps and 



mixed with this nature is a great 
deal of what may well be termed 
‘ ‘ good nature. ” If it were not so 
there would have to be an election 
in the Junior class for a new re- 
porter about the time the Preps 
read the account of this game. 

We should not pass this up 
without making mention of the 
playing of Morse at first for the 
Juniors. In time he will take 
rank with Hal Chase, Chance, and 
the other big fellows who pream- 
bulate around the initial sack. 
Out of five times at bat, Morse 
secured five pretty bingles and 
accepted everything that came his 
way on first base. The teams lined 
up like this : 

Juniors — Stennis, rf. ; Morse, 
lb. : Hand. cf. : Brooks, c. ; Bryan, 
3b. ; Gass ss. ; Therrell. p. ; Enochs, 
If. : Strom, 2b. 

Preps — McCoy, lb. ; D. Peeples, 
22. ; Stennis, cf. ; Williams, 3b. ; 
Rankin. 2b.; Johnson, If.; Smith, 
rf. ; R. Peeples, c. ; Jones, p. 



Co-eds in Football. 

As a Co-ed so nice, 

With steps precise, 

TrippecJ o’er the ice 

She slipped — her care in vain ; 

And at her fall, 

With usual gall 
The collegians’ call, 

“First down — two feet to gain.” 

H. 



Athletic Field. 

The week is ended, the rain has 
ceased, and the athletic field is 
not yet finished. For several days 
a reporter for this paper nas been 
trying to get an interview with 
Stennis, the great baseball mag- 
nate, but he has stated positively 
that he has nothing to say for 
publication. We have learned un- 
officially, however, through his 
private secretary that he is very 
much wrought up over the condi- 
tion of the ball park, and is wor- 
ried by the many telegrams in- 
quiring about the progress of the 
work, and complimenting him on 
finishing it by the time baseball 
proper begins. Hon. W. C. Leg- 
gett, a personal friend of the base- 
ball king, states that Mr. Stennis 
is doing all in his power for high 
class baseball at Millsaps, and so 



great are his exertions that he is 
endangering his health. Mr. Leg- 
gett says that he has been trying 
to get his friend to fly away with 
him to Tougaloo for a much need- 
ed rest before the strain of the 
mighty enterprise of which he is 
at the head, completely under- 
mines his health. 



Where Is Basketball, 

It is lamentable that some col- 
lege sports are sacrificed for other 
branches of sport. This seems to 
be true in basket ball at Millsaps. 
When football is in vogue, the 
basket ball players hasten to the 
gridiron and when baseftall prac- 
tice begins they scurry off to the 
diamond. Manager Guinn has 
been very enthusiastic in his ef- 
forts to arouse interest in basket 
ball, but his efforts seem to have 
been fruitless. But it is not too 
late. Baseball begins on the 22d 
of March, but can have a series 
of basket ball games along with 
baseball. We will not have more 
than three games of baseball a 
week, and our boys are getting to 
the point where they demand an 
athletic contest every day. 



YOU. 

(Prize poem adopted by the Sen- 
ior Glass). 

It is raining again, 

But it sometimes would rain 
Even when you were still here, 
Soon the sun will beam down 
And drive out the clouds’ frown 
Just as it did with you here. 

The wild violets bloom 
And the birds sing in tune 

As they bloomed and sang last 
year, 

And the days come and go 
Bringing pleasure or woe, 

Sorrow or joy to us here ; 

But the clouds are like night 
And the sun’s not as bright 
As it seemed when you were 
here 

And the violets’ scent, 

With the birds’ music went 
And they all went with you, 
dear. 



Track. 

Manager Welch of th,- track 
team says that he has secure^ 
over twenty-five dollars worth of 
prizes to be awarded on Field 
Day. Welch has been doing some 
very hard work recently and de- 
voting his time to the work of 
the organization of the team. He 
is to be complimented on the re- 
sults he has brought about. He 
says that he will not be satisfied 
until the prizes reach the neigh- 
borhood of the sevenry-five dollar 
mark. Several ten dollar prizes 
-.v i 1 1 be awarded Manager Welch 
urges that the candidates for the 
team :lo not let tnair interest 
wane in the track work. Let the 
interest and enthusiasm which 
has been manifested heretofore, 
characterize the work hereafter. 
Just wait until Field Day and the 
t. a<k men will be the ones to 
“shine.” 



Mr. John Robinson entertained 
his Kappa Alpha brothers at a de- 
lightful 6 o’clock dinner on last 
Saturday afternoon. His hospita- 
ble home was thrown open to the 
boys and when the entire chapter 
had responded to the invitation 
the party was a merry one in- 
deed. The fraternity colors were 
used in profusion in the decora- 
tions of the dining room. Cut flow- 
ers and ferns lent their charm to 
the scene and everywhere these 
flowers were tied with ribbon of 
crimson and gold. 

An elegant seven course dinner 
was served. Mrs. Robinson assist- 
ed her nephew in entertaining his 
friends, and proved herself a 
very charming hostess. 



I stood on the bridge at close 
of day, 

Attired in football clothes, 

And the bridge, I wish to say, 
Was the rival half-back’s nose. 

—Ex. 



A millionaire, very erratic 
Used to sleep with three pigs in 
an attic. 

When his folk asked him not to, 
He said, “Why I’ve got to 
In order to be democratic!” 





THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



The Purple and White 

Published Weekly by the Junior 
Class of Millsaps College 

ROBT. H. RUFF .... Editor-In-Chief 
E. C. BREWER .... Associate Editor 
A. B. CAMPBELL .... Athletic Editor 
MISS MARGARET SAUMS .Social Editor 
D. R. WASSON .... Y. M. C. A. Editor 

JOHN GASS Local Editor 

W. E. PHILLIPS Loca Editor 

M. L. NEILL Business Mgrr 

A. F. KELLY .... Assistant Bus. Mgr 

All matter for publication should be ad- 
dressed to the Editor-in-Chief. 

All business communications should be ad- 
dressed to the Business Mgrr., M. L. Neill. 

Entered as seacond class matter January 22, 
1909, at the post office at Jackson Miss., 
under act of Congress, March, 3, 1879 

Single Copy Per Annum 50 Cents 
Two Copies Per Annum 75 Cents 

EDITORIAL. 



Give the “Preps” a Medal. 

In a recent issue of our paper 
there appeared an editorial on 
“Learning to Speak in Public,” 
by Dr. W. L. C. Hunnicutt which 
impressed us very much. Every 
student in Millsaps College should 
read that excellent editorial and 
profit thereby. Altho it is not 
our purpose to comment on Dr. 
Hunnicutt ’s article, yet we wish to 
center our thought on the follow- 
ing excerpt from it: 

“The general neglect of the 
practice of declamation is a seri- 
ous defect in the public schools in 
our country.” 

Now you have already said: 
What has the public school to do 
with Millsaps College? Well, gen- 
tle reader, it is this. Our Prepara- 
tory Department, to which this is 
directed, does the same work 
that the public schools do in the 
advanced grades, and why not 
then let this apply to us ? 

It is verv noticeable in the lit- 
erary societies, where we can 
know better than anywhere else, 
that the “Preps” are very timid 
while on the floor, and they do 
not speak with that ease and 
grace that an accustomed speaker 
uses. They show lack of train- 
ing and an intense lack of inter- 
est in their society work. 

To remove these undesired 
qualities is what has prompted 
this article. Declaiming will de- 
velop one in many ways, but at 
the outset we must, have an in- 
centive to institute tuts practice. 
So while some are encouraging 
Inter-Collegiate Atheleties, some 
a new gymnasium, and others 
more co-eds, we come forward en- 
couraging a “Prep” medal for 
declamation. 

Among its manifold benefits 



comes, first, a development of in- 
terest. The boy who comes here 
and enters the Preparatory De- 
partment, sees nothing to bind 
him here as does the college stu- 
dent. There is no medal for 
which he may compete and the 
debatorships are given to the up- 
per classmen, and. as a result, he 
will go to another institution 
whose curriculum is lower than 
our’s so that he might be a col- 
legian. and contest for the med- 
als. 

Second, it will wear off timid- 
ity. All students, when they first 
enter college, are very bashful 
on the floor, and are ridiculed by 
their audience, and thus become 
disheartened. A contest would 
inspire them to a greater enthu- 
siasm and develop wirhin them 
a desire to wear this off. 

And last of all, ease an I grace 
will be acquired. This is very de- 
ficient among our collegiate stu- 
dents.. as well as the “Preps.” 
but the former have something to 
incite their desire to accomplish 
this, while, on the other hand, the 
latter have not. The modern or- 
ator must use ease and grace or 
he is the “laughing stock” of his 
audience, so for our future ora- 
tors to have these corrected sen- 
sibilities, why not encourage it, 
bv giving them a stimulus? 



Y. M. C. A. 

Listen, parents, to the good 
news we send you. Ltur meeting 
is a success. Your boy is saved. 
We know your joy is full, for we 
can conceive of no greater happi- 
ness than that, which, it seems to 
us. should come to a mother wnen 
she knows that her loved one, 
who was lost, is found. But as 
our Lord said of the apostles, “Ye 
are clean hut not all.” so here, 
“They are saved, hut not all.” 
So dear parent, if it is your hoy 
that is saved, rejoice, Out remem- 
ber while you rejoice, that some 
mother’s boy is still unsaved. It 
is needless to ask you to pray for 
your own boy, for what mother 
is there who does not pray for 
her son. when she knows he is 
subjected to great temptations, 
hut we do ask you to remember 
the unsaved when you go to the 
Throne of Grace. By getting 
them converted, there will not he 
so many temptations thrown 
around your own boy. 

About forty have consecrated 
their lives to God. Just think 
of it. Forty new soldiers on the 



field. Fall in line, boys. Keep 
step. Let us get in the breast 
works, as did the men of Malvern 
Hill, and determine to die there 
or hold the works. God has done 
much for you, now it is your turn 
to do something for him. He 
needs you and we need you. 

We were very fortunate in get- 
ting Brothers Harbin and Guice 
to conduct our meeting. We wish 
to express our thanks to them for 
coming and for the good work 
they have done. They are men 
of great faith and power. We 
shall ever remember them for 
their songs and earnest words 
of exhortation. We are sorry 
they have to leave us. May suc- 
cess ever attend them as it has 
here. 

The sermon last Monday night 
deserves especial mention both on 
account of what was said and the 
effect it produced. The subject 
Mr. Harbin used on that night 
was “A Man Wanted.” and while 
the sermon was directed to men 
only, yet in the words of the 
speaker, “No Southern gentleman 
gentleman should listen to a 
thing a lady cannot hear.” 

We were told what it took to 
h e a man and at every step the 
true sense of a moral manhood 
was fore.Vfully appealed to by 
the speaker. We were shown that 
the men that are in demand to- 
day are men who read their Bible 
and live the prayer life. Men who 
keep their tongue bridled from 
speaking profane and Idle things. 
Men who are too full of gentle- 
manly nature and the love of God 
to “he a negro, ves. a veritable 
black brute at night time, and a 
white man durin? the day time.” 

It was a strong address, and 
if there were any on the campus 
who missed that splendid service, 
they have much to regret. When 
an opportunity was given for 
those to live the higher life to 
make it manifest, the isles were 
filled with men who were men 
indeed and wen who were filled 
with a determinination that will 
mean much to Millsaps men, let 
us live up to the sandard tnat 
was set for us and be “A South- 
ern Gentleman.” 



The Way for a Young Man to 
Rise. 

(From a letter written by Abra- 
ham Lincoln to William H. 
Herndon, July 10, 1848). 

I cannot but think there is some 



mistake in your impression of the 
motives of the old man. I sup- 
pose I am now one of the old men, 
and I declare, on my veracity, 
which I think is good with you. 
that nothing could afford me more 
satisfaction than to learn that you 
and others of my young friends 
at home are doing battle in the 
contest, and endearing themselves 
to the people, and taking a stand 
far above any I have ever been 
able to reach in their admiration. 
I cannot conceive that other old 
men feel differently. 

Of course I cannot demonstrate 
what I say ; but I was young once, 
and I am sure I was never ungen- 
erously thrust back. I hardly 
know what to say. The way for a 
young man to rise is to improve 
himself every way he can, never 
suspecting that anybody wishes 
to hinder him. Allow me .to as- 
sure you that suspicion and jeal- 
ousy never did help any man in 
any situation. 

There may sometimes be ungen- 
erous attempts to keep a young 
man down ; and they will succeed, 
too, if he allows his mind to he 
diverted from its true channel to 
brood over the attempted injury. 
Cast about and see if this feeling 
has not injured every person you 
have ever known to fall into it. 



Program of Literary Societies. 

The following is the program of 
the Galloway Literary Society for 
March 19, 1909: 

Deelaimer — B. C. Kush. 

Orator— L. M. Blount. 

Question : Resolved, That the 

Governor’s power to pardon 
should be restricted. 

Debators. 

Affirmative — J. D. Wroten, W. 

C. Churchwell, H. A. Stennis. 

Negative — D. H. Glass, Leon 
Whitson, D. D. Cameron. 

Tom Stennis, Pres. 

H. M. Frizell, Sec’y. 

The following is the program 
of the Lamar Literary Society for 
March 19. 1909. 

Deelaimer — Steen. 

Orator — Donnell. 

Question. Resolved, That the 
cabinet of the President of the 
LTnited States should be elected 
rather than appointed. 

Debators. 

Affirmative — Gass, Bingham, J. 

B. Kirkland. 

Negative — McLuer, Campbell, i 

B. L., Clark, W. S. 

R. J| Mullins, Pres. 

F. W. Wimberly, Sep ’y. 



PUBPLE AND WHITE 



Chairmen Appointed. 

After carefully considering the 
men the president has made the 
following appointments for chair- 
man of committees: Devotional, 

R. M. Brown; Bible Study, D. R. 
Wasson; Mission Study, R. H. 
Ruff; Membership, A. C. Ander- 
son; Finance, F. S. Williams; 
Hand Book, M. L. Neill; Recep- 
tion, A. B. Campbell. 

Nearly all the work of the Asso- 
ciation is done by the committee 
system. Each department has a 
chairman and three sub-commit- 
teemen. who together with the 
chairman, do the work of their 
department. 

The chairmen together with of- 
ficers of the Association constitute 
the cabinet who get together at 
stated intervals and form a work- 
ing policy for the Association. 

We want to impress upon these 
men who have been appointed the 
importance of their work. If they 
neglect their work and abuse all 
their spiritual lives, the work of 
the Association must of a neces- 
sity be very poor. 

But if you will put your shoul- 
ders to the wheel and help the 
president with the policy that has 
been outlined, you can make this 
the best year the Association has 
ever known. 

An added responsibility is yours 
since the revival has closed. With 
forty men who have taken the 
stand for Christian living, the 
task is to a great extent yours, 
to see that they have some defi- 
nite Christian work to do. A man 
to live a consecrated Christian life 
cannot do so by himself. He 
must work. Get him in Bible 
study and mission study and get 
him to attend the Association reg- 
ularly and you will have done 
much toward helping him win the 
fight and struggle which he is 
having to meet. 

No more can a man live a help- 
ful. useful Christian life by him- 
self, than can a live coal keep 
glowing and burning when it has 
been placed to itself. 

As chairman of tne Devotional 
Committee it is your place to see 
that the men who took the stand 
for the right life during the re- 
vival, join the church of their 
choice if they are not already 
members. And it would be advis- 
able for you to write each one’s 
parents telling them of the stand 
their son has taken and for them 
to encourage him m every way 
possible and to pray for him with- 
out ceasing. 



As chairman of the Bible Study, 
see that they are promptly en- 
rolled in a Bible class. And you 
as chairman of the Membership 
see that they join the Association 
and have a hearty welcome. The 
chairman of the Mission Study 
must not neglect to interest them 
in the great cause of missions and 
give I hem all the help he can. 

We are sorry the president of 
the Association was confined to 
his room on account of illness dur- 
ing the meeting. But we know 
he was with us in spirit and in 
prayer. 



Game Laws of Kentucky. 

Plain citizens may be shot from 
January 1 to December 31. 

Senators, Governors an.l mem- 
bers of Congress may be shot dur- 
ing any political campaign and 
within sixty days thereafter. 

Niggers can be shot at any 
time. 

If any man is caught drinking 
water, it is a sign that he is no 
gentleman and may be executed 
with whatever weapon is nearest 
at hand. 

Any citizen who does not tote 
the remains of his victim from 
public sight within forty-eight 
hours of the time first volley was 
fired, will be fined one gallon of 
moonshine. 

Any citizen who steps on an- 
other citizen’s toes may be shot 
on the spot with the privilege of 
apologizing thereafter. 

If any citizen leaves home half 
shot and is found on the street a 
short time after full of buck shot, 
that is his fault, and his relatives 
are not allowed to shoot more 
than seventeen suspects in their 
efforts to find the guilty persons. 
— Yale Record. 



The Old, Old Story. 

Inter-collegiate athletics is the 
principal means of developing 
and maintaining a good, healthy 
college spirit. — Ouachita Ripples. 

The honor to be had in inter- 
collegiate contests must and will 
continue to be the keystone of 
the arch without which college 
athletics would resemble a game 
of Blind Man’s Bluff in a deaf 
and dumb asylum. — Baylor Lit- 
erary. 

Perhaps there is nothing that 
contributes more to the life of a 
school than contests. In more 
ways than some are accustomed 



to think, they are helpful. 

In athletics the prospect of 
games with other schools is an 
incentive to the students to put 
forth their best efforts in the hope 
of being able to make the college 
team. Besides, a few hotly con- 
tested games will instill real col- 
ege spirit into the students to a 
degree never suspected by those 
who have not been shown. 

Oratorical contests and inter- 
collegiate debates also serve a 
good en.d The true aim of 
schools should be to develop men 
who can really do things in the 
realm of mental endeavor. Such 
contests puts one on his metal and 
stimulates him to his utmost 
ability. 

In all these things it is some- 
thing of a stimulus to the con- 
testant to know that he has the 
support and sympathy of the stu- 
dent body. When he realizes that 
the interests of others is depend- 
ing upon him, his efforts will be 
inspired. Failure is the fate of 
any student enterprise that is not 
backed up by the mass of stu- 
dents. 

In our own case w<- can truth- 
fully say that no phase of inter- 
collegiate contests is more thor- 
oughly enjoyed, and from wfiich 
our college receives greater actual 
benefit than from intercollegiate 
athletics. The side lines are as 
inrispensible here as is the chair 
of mathematics or modern lan- 
guages. We can hardly imagine 
the condition of affairs before we 
were granted the privilege of 
matching our athletic strength 
against our neighbors. — Maroon 
and Gold. 

Tne manifestation of college 
spirit by the A. & M. students at 
Jackson after the return of the 
team to college, will live in the 
minds of the participants for 
many years. Especially was the 
reception given the team upon its 
return worthy of the glorious vic- 
tory, and the expressions of ap- 
preciation prove the members of 
the team amply repaid the exer- 
tions of the student body. It is 
this snirit that builds tradition 
around a school and ft is for this 
that a man will fight to the last 
ditch, and it is because of this that 
one’s alma mater is dear to him, 
therefore let us cherish and de- 
velop this spirit. — College Re- 
flector. 

This is the way some of our 
neighbors look on college spirit 



and inter-collegiate athletics. Th'\v 
base their statements on expe- 
rience. They dwell in that charm- 
ing realm where inter-collegiate 
athletics abounds. Oh yes, we 
will be honest. We may envy you 
and we must admit that our col- 
lege spirit is about the worst 
ever. But the time is coming 
when matters will not be thus. 
Just watch us. — Purple and 
White. 



LOCALS. 

Several of our boys went to 
“Texas” and back in two hours 
and forty minutes one night last 
week. 

Ed Brewer was sick several 
days last wek. But we are very 
glad that he is able to be up at 
present. 

Mr. Pope Ramsey of Durant is 
at home at present. Mr. Ramsej 
has a bad ease of lagrippe and 
we hope he will be able to return 
to school soon. 

John Crisler of the Junior Class 
is sick this week with the mumps. 

George Russum was at home 
several days last week on account 
of illness. 

Sophomore to Freshman : Nace 
is the formula for table salt. 
Freshman (with an air of disgust) 
Do you know the meaning of the 
word Sophomore ? 

Rev. C. N. Guice, who has been 
leading the singing in the recent 
revival, left Monday morning for 
Bougaloosa, where he will begin 
a series of revival services. 

Bennie Briscoe, of the State 
University, spent several days last 
week with friends in Jackson. Mr. 
Briscoe is a former student of 
Millsaps. 

Mr. Mark Guinn is still sick 
with the mumps. Mark seems to 
be having a rather hard time as 
this is his second week of illness. 

Albert Heidelburg Is getting to 
be very brave in his old age. He 
has ridden the Knights of Pythias 
goat twice in the past two weeks. 

The literary societies did not 
meet Friday night as tne boys did 
not wish to interfere in any way 
with the revival services. 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 




Don’t walk by our beautiful 
display of wall papers without 
inspection. 



HALL-MILLER 
Paint and Glass Co. 

Wholesale Paints for All Purposes. 
Ill State Street. Phone 865. 




The Best Shoe 

for a College Boy is the 

HOWARD AND FOSTER 
$3 50 and $4 00 

Guaranteed bo be as good as any 
other Shoe costing $5.00 or less. 

We are always glad to accommo- 
date Millsaps College boys when- 
ever we can. 

Come to see us. 

TATOM SHOE CO. 

HR. <T. ipepper 

foaberftasfret 

and 

fatter 

523 EAST CAPITOL STREET 

Full Line Suit Cases and Bags 

Fine Tailoring is Our Specialty 

Phone 1002 Jackson, Miss. 

RAZORS 

Honed 15e 

All Work Guaranteed 

J. S. Duke 



Dr. Sullivan is a victim of hot 
competition at present or he is 
going to turn out some world-re- 
nowned scientists from the Soph- 
omore Class. It is generally known 
about the campus that several 
members of the' Sophomore chem- 
istry class have in some manner 
secured enough material to put a 
labratory in their rooms. They 
are said to perform many experi- 
ments. 

He is heard to utter such words 
as would even startle a Daniel 
Webster, yet they convey no 
meaning to any one — Tom Phil- 
lips. 

On the evening of the first Wed- 
nesday in May the inter-colle- 
giate debate between Millsaps and 
the Southern University will be 
heard at Greensborough, Ala. This 
event is looked forward to with 
much interest and enthusiasm by 
all of the students. Millsaps won 
in the first two debates and with 
such able men as Bob Ruff and 
Bob Mullins we feel sure of suc- 
cess. 

Mr. V. L. Terrell is sick at pres- 
ent with a bad cold. 

Quite a number of Sophomores 
say they took in Westward Ho ! 
were many and disastrous. 

We are all very glad to see Miss 
Mary Baley at school this week. 
She fell a victim to the dreaded 
mumps, and was out of school for 
two weeks. 

The hypnotized man slept for 
seven tyt wo hours in Johnson’s 
show window. Buck says it was 
a sin, for the man missed too 
much of what happened around 
him. . 

Boyd Campbell has hired Bill 
Phillips at a handsome sum to 
stand at the door of his room and 
direct the visitors to the angelic 
sight of a photo recently received 
from Ruston, and her name was 
Edith. 

A young Freshman bought some 
pajamas 

Made from the wool of the llamas. 

They fit him so bad. 

That it really was sad, 

And the folks all thought they 
were mamma’s. 

—Ex. 

The Sophs saw something green 
his true: 



Correct writing cards are what 
you want to enclose with your in- 
vitations. 

Plate and fifty cards script en- 
graving for one dollar. 

Eyrich & Co. 



They thought it was the Freshman 
class ; 

But when they closer to it drew, 
They found it was a looking glass. 

—Ex. 

Of course I’ve seen trees holler 
Seen also a board walk ; 

And of the trees that leave in 
spring • 

I ’ve often heard them talk. 

But some one saw a house fly, 
But that to me was new, 

For every time I noticed 
It was the chimney flue. 

—Ex. 

Alexander says he reads his 
Latin lesson from four books. 



GO 10 




for yoir Refreshments 

EAT AT h S 



RESTAU RANT. 

Don’t Fail To See Him 
Before Having Your 
Receptions. 

Phone 201. 502 E. Capitol St. 



When clothes are soiled 
Have them boiled 

Get Eizzy 
Ring Izzy 

Jackson Steam Laundry, 

PHONE 730 
MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Jackson, Miss. 

Millsaps College offers courses leading 
to two degrees: B. A & B. S. 

For Catalogue, address 

W. B. MURRAH, Pres. 



GO TO 

JACKSON MERCANTILE 
COMPANY. 

for Fancy Groceries and all kinds 
of Feed Stuffs. Same quality ab 
lower prices. . Prompt deliverty is 
our motto. 

G. W. SISTRUNK 

Handles all Kinds of 

Good things to eat. 

Goods always fresh and prices 
reasonable . 

Nice line of Stationery on hand 
Give him a trial 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 
College Photographer. 

Jackson, 

Miss. 

Capitol St., near Bridge. 



WHEN DOWN TOWN 

Drop in at 

Your Old Friend’s Fountain, for 

BOTH HOT and COLD DRINKS 

J. S. MANGUM, 

At Hunter A McGee’s. 



'Hederman Bros. 

gook and Job 

PRINTING. 

JACKSON. MISS. 





THE PURPLE AND WHITE 





QUAE FIANT, EX HOC COGNOSCE8. 


. - J f r * •% r-.. _ . ; , , _ 7 


Volume One 


Jackson, Mississippi, March 26, 1909 


Number Twelve 


ATHLETICS. 

An Athletic Atmosphere. 


sense of the supernatural and in- don what is not only good but in 
finite and eternal. a sense necessary, because of 

The second element in this col- abuses, especially wnere those 


to the ideal of “a sound mind in 
a sound body.” 

H. B. Watkins 



* 



I choose to speak of that, some- 
thing which we usually denomi- 
nate as an influence, a pervading 
influence, as an atmosphere and 
to -say in that connection that men 
are going to be very much what 
the atmosphere is in which they 
live. The pale faced child, deli- 
cate and slender, into whose face 
you looked yesterday is an inhab- 
itant of the atmosphere of a cot- 
ton mill and that atmosphere will 
most probably be changed for 
that of the grave. 

The ruddy cheeked boy whose 
healthy face attracted your atten- 
tion today was a denizen of some 
country neighborhood and bor- 
rowed his roses from the glow of 
the morning sun and his song 
from the fresh pure air that had 
also put that carol upon the beak 
of the bird to whose sweet music 
you turned. 

That yellow skinned, cadaver- 
ous, sickly individual upon whom 
you have just cast a pathetic eye 
is a citizen of the swamp and has 
had his blood poisoned by that 
subtle something we call malaria. 

That strong vigorous man, rud- 
dy and energetic, toward whom 
you may have cast a wishful eye 
enjoying the health written there 
lives on a farm in the pine woods 
and breathes its resinous air. the 
nearest thing to the fabled elixir 
of life known in reality today. 

Repeating now the proposition 
that a man will be largely what 
is the atmosphere in which he 
lives I desire to say that for the 
best college life in its atmosphere 
there must be well mingled three 
* elements : 

The first is the religious. I mean 
more than moral for there should 
be in every college an atmosphere 
that breathes of that spirit rela- 
tionship between God and man 
.which makes man a loving, be- 
lieving, worshipping child as well 
as an obedient, clean one. In this 
matter the denominational col- 
lege should have all the advan- 
tage and in the selection of a 
faculty and in the shaping of col- 
’°ge life should charge the atmos- 
1 of the institution with the 



lege atmosphere should of course 
be the intellectual and there 
should be something in the very 
air that make men despise the in- 
tellectual sluggard and decry in- 
tellectual poverty. The labora- 
tory, the library and the observa- 
tory- should be looked upon as 
places of rare and sacred oppor- 
tunity and the great authors and 
scientists and all the great think- 
ers should have very real voices 
and receive the most reverent at- 
tention at every ear. This is the 
atmosphere in which the intellect 
awakes to its fullest, and the 
man breathes the breatn ot a 
great throbbing life enriched and 
beautified by the intellectual 
greatness. 

I come now to speak of the 
third element in a healthy col- 
lege atmosphere, the athletic, 
representing the development, 
strengthening and perfecting the 
physical men, the regret of which 
element is a crime against the 
other two. Never before perhaps 
Avas the importance of this ele- 
ment greater than in this stren- 
uous age when such tax is made 
upon mind and body. And, we 
might add. never before in the 
history of American college life 
was this atmosphere more nearly 
appreciated. I do not hesitate to 
say after considerable observa- 
tion of college life that this at- 
mosphere in its purest form is 
well nigh impossible of perpetua- 
tion without the privilege of in- 
ter-collegiate athletic games. 
Ther e is something so thrilling, so 
delightful, so attractive about this 
unrivaled rivalry that it guaran- 
tees at once the creation and 
preservation of this atmosphere. 

Now, the objection to these in- 
ter-collegiate games grows large- 
ly out of their abuses. With the 
exception of football I have 
heard no objection to athletic 
games groAving out of the nature 
of the games themselves. Surely 
to tennis, basket ball and baseball 
no one who knows the game 
could find any real objections in 
the games themselves. But it is 
the abuses to which we all objeet. 

I submit that it is unwise to aban- 



abuses may be very easily cor- 
rected and guarded against. The 
alleged loss of time is guarded 
against by limiting the number of 
games per season. The alleged 
neglect of scholarship is guarded 
against by requiring a high aver- 
age in scholarships by the partic- 
ipants. The alleged immoralities 
incident to the games are guard- 
ed against by firmly disallowing 
immoral men on the teams. So 
that instead of destroying the re- 
ligious and intellectual elements 
in college atmosphere they may 
really contribute to it. 

The world has a good oppor- 
tunity to record every wound in- 
cident to American football. The 
morning papers in great head 
lines tell all the details of a most 
trivial wound. The world knoivs 
all about that. 

But who Avrites the story of 
the pale, hard-working student 
who spends his time every after- 
noon studying, taking no genuine 
physical exercise because the col- 
lege in which he studies has pro- 
vided no healthy athletic atmos- 
phere which calls him to the play 
ground each afternoon where the 
“varsity team” and the number- 
less class and scrub teams are 
making things lively? Who tells 
the record of the college graduate 
who falls early in life’s taxing 
conflict because his physical man 
was not trained along Avith his 
religious and intellectual natures ? 
No scare heads tell his story. He 
drops out unseen and an early 
grave conceals the secret of his 
fall. Where the football fatality 
happens once the above named 
calamity happens dozens of times. 

I yield to none in my respect for 
the opinion of others and no one 
Avill lend a more teachable ear 
whenever the other side is pre- 
sented and as long as that spirit 
is maintained by both sides re- 
spectful and sincere discussion of 
the question can but do good — I 
earnestly desire to see that at- 
mosphere maintained in Alma 
Mater that shall contribute most 



Of the Class of ’99. 

Sophs Put It Over High School. 

The Jackson High School team, 
followed by a large bunch of 
rooters, came out Wednesday, the 
17th, and met the Sophomore 
team on the local diamond. The 
game Avas neither fast nor bril- 
liant, and yet it was spirited 
throughout. Galloway was de- 
tailed for slab duty by Manager 
Peeples, but after he had him hit 
freely for several innings, Buck 
was substituted;, and he pitched 
an excellent game, striking out 
ten men in four innings. He had 
a surplus of speed and an exeel- 
lent assortment of curves. Rick- 
etts, his battery partner, also 
played high-class ball. 

For Jackson Shields and Hains 
played the best game. Out of 
four times at bat Shields got a 
single, a three-bagger and a home 
run, while Hains played an er- 
rorless game at second, and bat- 
ted at a clip that puts him in the 
thousand class. This is the Avay 
it happened : ^ 

High School— AB. H. A. PO. E. * 

Birdsong, If 4 1 0 2 0 

Haynes, 2b 4 3 2 3 0 

Woodworth, c. . . . 4 0 1 6 0 

Shields, 3b. 4 3 0 1 0 

Morris, ss 4 0 0 2 2 

Pool, rf 3 0 0 0 0 

Manship, cf 3 0 0 1 1 

Quin, lb., 3 0 0 6 0 

Magruder, p 3 0 1 0 0 

Hemphill, lb 4 0 0 5 0 

Myers 1 0 0 0 0 

Millsaps Sophs — AB. H. A. PO. E. 

Ricketts, c 4 1 2 12 0 

Jumper, ss., 4 2 1 2 2 

Peeples, lb 3 1 0 7 1 

Spann, 2b 3 0 1 1 0 

Davis, 3b 3 1 1 2 0 

Haley, cf 3 0 0 0 0 

Lewis, rf 3 0 0 0 1 

Buck, cf., p 3 0 3 2 0 

Galloway., p 3 0 1 1 0 

Hits Apportioned — Off Gallo- 
way 6, Buck 1, Magruder 5. 

Struck Out — By Galloway 1, 
Buck 10, Magruder 4. 

Three-base Hits — Shields, and 
Jumper. 

Home Run — Shields. 

Umpire — D. Peeples. 

Time, 1:23. 






The Purple and White 

Published Weekly by the Junior 
Class of Millsaps College 



BOBT. H. RUFF .... Editor-tn-ChUf 
E. C. BREWER .... Associate Editor 
A. B. CAMPBELL .... Athletic Editor 
MISS MARGARET SAUM8 . Social Editor 
D. R. WASSON .... Y. M. C. A. Editor 

JOHN GASS Local Editor 

W. E. PHILLIPS Loca Editor 

M. L. NEILL Business Mgr 

A. F. KELLY .... Assistant Bus. Mgr 



All matter for publication should be ad- 
dressed to the Editor-In-Chief. 

All business communications should be ad- 
dressed to the Business Mgr., M. L. Neill. 

Entered as seacond class matter January 22, 
1909, at the postofflce at Jackson Miss., 
under act of Congress, March, 3, 1879 

Single Copy Per Annum 50 Cents 
Two Copies Per Annum 75 Cents 

EDITORIAL 



not manifest itself only in sports 
and contests. It can be very easily 
proven by our loyalty to our 
work and by conforming strictly 
to the college rules and regula- 
tions. 

Surely we can enjoy our sum- 
mer vacation better after know- 
ing that we have gotten some 
good out of the college year and 
that our time was not spent in 



Get Busy. 

It seems hard to realize that 
the close of the session of 1908- 
09 is so close on us. Have we 
gotten any real good out of the 
college work during this session? 
If wehave not it is surely time 
to think about it. We yet have 
several weeks of school an. I if we 
will apply ourselves and our time 

we ean accomplish great results. 

✓ 

First, our duty is to our books. 
Of course if we haven’t studied 
heretofore it will be nard to begin 
now, but where there’s a will 
there’s a way. We must go at it 
with all our might and main and 
determine not only to make the 
necessary passing grade but de- 
termine to get on the honor roll. 

In the gone by years it has 
rather been the custom to let the 
interest die out in the literary 
societies during the last few 
weeks of the school. Let’s not 
do that this year. Why are not 
the last weeks as important as 
the first. We all ought to take 
interest in the anniversary occa- 
sions. Of course we all can’t be 
speakers, but we can be disteners 
to inspire the ones who were so 
fortunate as to be elected to their 
positions. 

Then let us display as much col- 
lege spirit as possible. In a few 
weeks we will have a chance to 
show whether or not we have any 
spirit, it is when the oratorical 
contest comes off. Whether our 
speaker wins first or second place 
or not we can nevertheless cheer 
him as though he had won. When 
the class teams engage in the 
games of different kinds we can 
yell for our team just a3 though 
they were playing some other 
college. Yet college spirit does 



We are glad to publish these 
articles from the preparatory stu- 
dents on“Why the Preps Should 
Have a Society.” 

At present Millsaps has no lit- 
erary society for preparatory stu- 
dents. For some time the need 
of such a society ha3 been felt 
and there is no necessity nor ex- 
cuse for further delay in this im- 
portant matter. A large per cent 
of the students are “Preps,” but 
very few of these are members of 
the college societies. They feel 
the incompleteness of their train- 
ing and are timid about meeting 
the more advanced students on 
an equal footing. Another rea- 
son for the small parr they have 
in the work of the societies is 
that they have no place in orator- 
ical contests and so have nothing 
to stimulate them to toward ef- 
fort in this line. We must have 
a society for the Preps, them- 
selves before they will take the 
interest they should in public 
speaking. 

G.B. H. 

In organizing this Prep. Liter- 
ary Society, we expect to have a 
constitution that will provide 
means wherewith we may derive 
much good from the Parlimen- 
tarv Practice. 

We will have Prep, against 
Prep. Equal ability against 
equal ability. 

As it is at present, we have to 
compete with men who have had 
better opportunities afforded 
them in the line of debating, than 
we have had. Men who are fur- 
ther advanced in the college 
course than we are. 

In short, the purpose of organ- 
izing a Prep. Society is that we 
may all be on an equal footing 
and have equal opportunities to 
debate. 

M. J. 

The increased activity among 
us occasioned by a Prep. Society 
would result in great good. With 
a society all our very own we 
would be stimulated to put forth 



unwonted energy to make it a 
success. The preparation of so- 
ciety work would necessitate a 
close study of the works of our 
best writers — thereby promoting 
the cause for which all societies 
exist. This effort would give us 
a better understanding and ap- 
preciation of good literature. All 
this would foster the reading hab- 
it — a habit well worth striving 
for. A wise man once showed his 
appreciation of this habit when 
he said, “I would rather be a 
poor man living in a garret and 
love reading than be a king and 
not love reading.” We could get 
this habit if we had a Prep. So- 
ciety, therefore I say, “Give us a 
PREP. Society, or give us death.” 
F. C. G. 

A Prep. Society will mean to 
the other societies just what the 
Preparatory Department means 
to the college. It will prepare 
the Preps, to do better work 
when they are put on program in 
other societies. 

Quite a number of the Preps, 
do not join the college societies 
because of timidity in the pres- 
ence of critical hearers. With 
the training they would get in 
a Prep. Society this feeling 
would be removecr. Therefore, 
many of them would be induced 
to join the other societies. Be- 
sides this, when they were once 
interested in society work, they 
would want to get in the other 
societies and show the higher 
classmen what they can do. 

E. M. L. 

Some one said, “The preps can 
not manage a society because 
they have not sense enough.” If 
any of you think such a thing, 

I am sure you think wrong. Give 
the Preps, a chance and they will 
show you what they can do. 
There are a sufficient number of 
men in the Prep, classes who are 
old enough, and who have had 
experience enough in business 
life to manage a society and 
make it a success and honor to 
our grand old college. They are 
not so far advanced in books as 
college men, but they have the 
common sense, the stuff it takes 
to rule the world. 

E. C. L. 

Gall away Literary Society. 

The question for the evening: 
Resolved, “That the Governor’s 
Power Should Be Restricted,” 
was creditably defended on the 
affirmative bv Messrs. Western 



Stennis and Murphy, and on the 
negative by Messrs. Glass, Cam- 
eron and Anderson. 

Had it not been for the weighty 
argument advanced by the affir- 
mative debators, the present 
pardoning power invested in our 
Chief Magistrate would still con- 
tinue in the mind3 of the dream- 
ers. 

The principal feature of the 
program was the debate between 
Messrs. Alford, representing the 
affirmative, and Ruff, the nega- 
tive, in the irregular debate, 
however the n gative speaker ’3 
argument reversed the previous 
decision of this question and all 
bids fair for Governor Noel to 
continue to pardon a3 he sees fit 

The impr, omptu debate, Re- 
solved , That the State Contest 
should be leld at one of the 
competing colleges, was decided 
in favorof the negative. In this 
question Mr. Backstrom upheld 
the affirmative and Mr. R ynolds 
thenegative. 

The program for the evening 
was unusually good and our men 
are to be congratulated in their 
efforts to bring about a better 
society. We regret however that 
the declaimer and the orator 
were absent, a thing which takes 
much pleasure from those who 
fancy the disbursement of rhetor- 
ical and oratorical figures. 

“Resolved, That Lynching is 
Justifiable,” is the adopted 
question for two weeks hence. 
Rev. Willie N. . Thomas was 
chosen monthly orator. 

President Pro Tefci Frizell 
wielded the gavel in a regular 
Tom Reed style, handing down 
some very strict rulings, while 
secretaries Ruff and Beasley 
looked after the secretarial work. 

Lamar Literary Society. 

t 

Owing to the absence of 
President Robert Jackson Mullins 
the venerable C. E. Johnson as 
vice president presided. Who 
knows but what direful mistakes 
mig'ntnot have ensued had it not 
been for Mr. Ralph Sharborough, 
who could quote from memory 
Robert’s Rules of Order, refering 
to page and paragraph as he .j 
went, and who kindly and genar- II 
ously dictated each and every 
ruling of the chair. Ex Presi- 
dent Sharbrough, since his re- 
tirement from office has become 
quite familiar with the govern- 
ing rules and is always ready a 7 '’ 
prepared with valuable ii/^* 





THE PURPLE AND WHITE 







Juniors Play Sophs This After- 
noon. 

The regular schedule of games 
has now started, and will last 
until May 1st. Tne teams are well 
organized and are competent to 
put up a game that should hold 
the attention of the most learned 
baseball fan. So let us turn out 
to the games in full force. You 
should form the habit of walking 
over to the ball park during rec- 
reation hours, and you can rest 
assured that there w«I always be 
something doing. Also use your 
influence to get the professors 
and co-eds out to see the games. 

Juniors and Sophomores cross 
bats this afternoon. These teams 
are old rivals and the game will 
be hard fought and spirited. Buck 
will be on the firing line for the 
Sophs and Applewhite will twirl 
for the Juniors. Lets all go out 
and see how it is done. 

Baseball Schedule. 

Manager Stennis has completed 
our baseball schedule for this 
season. Twenty-one games will 
be played and this should afford 
baseball to our hearts’ desire. 
All postponed and tie games are 
to be played off, and the team 
that wins the series will play a 
picked team on April 26 and 28 
and May 1. The schedule is as 
follows : 

Thursday, March 25, Preps- 
Fres'nmen. 

Friday, March 26, Soph.-Jun- 
ior-Senior. 

Wednesday. March 31. Soph.- 
Freshmen. 

Thursday, April 1. Preps.-Jun- 
ior-Senior. 

Saturday, April 3, Preps.- 
Sophs. 

Monday, April 5, Sophs.-Junior- 
Senior. 

Wednesday, April 7, Freshmen- 
Sophs. 

Thursday, April 8, Preps.-Jun- 
ior-Senior. 

Saturday, April 10, Preps.- 
Fresh. 

Monday, April 12, Fresh.-Jun- 
ior-Senior. 

Wednesday, April 14, Preps.- 
Sophs. 

• Thursday, April 15. Freshmen- 
Jimior-Senior. 

Saturday, April 17, Prep.-Soph. 
Monday, April 19, Prep.-Junior- 
Senior. 

Wednesday, April 21, Soph.- 
. Junior-Senior. 

Thursday, April 22, Prep.- 
Fresf A 



Saturday, April 24, Fresh.- 
Sophs. 

tion to correct the erring presi- 
dent. 

He and Mr. Bailey form a 
pair, of which any organization 
from a Vaudeville show to a 
fools pink tea, should feel justly 
proud. With the exception of an 
occasional interruption of wit is- 
suing from the aforename’s gray 
matter, all passed off well. 

The literary exercises, accord- 
ing to the critic exception- 

ally good. Mr. Stein’s declama- 
tion was well rendered. Mr. Don- 
nell made his debate in an ora- 
tion, which was of intense inter- 
est. He acquited himself very 
creditably. 

The debate. “Resolved. The 
President’s Cabinet Should be 
Elected Rather Than Appointed” 
was debated by Messrs. Mass and 
Bingham on the affirmative and 
Messrs Campbell, B. L. and Clark, 
W. S. on thenegative. Theques- 
tion was not as dry as it seems, 
and to Mr. W. S. Clark, the so- 
ciety owed the source of much 
merriment, although the negative 
side failed to win. 

‘ Much interest was manifested 
when the question for extempo- 
raneous debate was announced. 

“Resolved that the Fire in the 
Main Building was Placed 
There With Malicious intent,” 
Skillful arguments on the af- 
firmative were advanced by 
Messrs. Green and Rainey, who 
with the aid of the society suc- 
ceeded in winning the question. 

Nothing more of interest de- 
veloped and the society adjourn- 
ed. 

Y. M. C. A. 

The meetings since the r -rival 
were conducted by Mr Ho! i es, 
W. B. Lewis, Haley ani Wli’ti- 
r< consecrated their dves t‘ tne 
ker. All these men hav° r.* ently 
Master. They are to be com 
mended for this boll begiunng 
They all did exceptionally well 
for beginners. 

It does our hearts good to see 
the willingness with which they 
take up the work. When we see 
the m so eager to do, and when we 
think how reluctant we have 
been to do the Master’s work, it 
almost puts us to shame. Some of 
us are too ■'t-upid or lazy in 
the Lords vineyard. Shall we, 
seeing fresh men in the field, sit 



down on the stool oi do-nothing 
and say to them, “Blaze away 
boys. There is plenty of it to 
do?” Or shall we, encourage by 
this reinforcement and profiting 
by past experience, take the lead 
calling out to them, “Come on 
boys, let’s clean up the debris?” 
The attendance has been very 
good since the revival, not, how- 
ever, as large as should have 
been. Let us insist that every one 
come to the service every time, 
whether you are a meniber of the 
association or not. You should 
come, not only to near what the 
speaker has to say, but also to 
encourage the speaker and you 
should come for the pleasure of 
being together and singing and 
praying together. 

We like that word “associ- 
ation.” Let us not get into our 
heads too much the idea that 
when we go there we are going 
tochurch or preaching, but we 
should consider the talk as one of 
thefeatures of the evening and not 
the ole purpose of the meeting. 

Let this not suggest to the lead- 
ers that they are not to do their 
best. The Lord expects their 
best service and not their second 
best. 

LOCALS. 

Dr. L. C. Jones, of Madison, 
was out to see his son one day 
last week. 

Gus Kelly says he wishes Ruth 
Gray would come back to Jack- 
son. He says that some crazy 
“geiser” has stolen his hat. 

It is generally known that there 
is less cigarette smoking among 
the boys at Millsaps this year 
than ever before. 

Roscoe Berry went home Sun- 
daynight on account of illness. 

We are glad to report that 
John Crisler of the Junior class is 
able to he up at present and that 
our sickk list as a whole has been 
reduced considerabbly in the past 
week. 

The “Remarks,” “Simple Si- 
mon” of the Belhan en junior 
class add much to the reading 
matter of the Gun day Clarion- 
Ledger, and we want to give fif- 
teen rahs for the other junior 
class. 

Bro. J. L. Neill spent several 
days on theeampus last week, 
and all of the old boys were glad 
to see this alumnus. Bro. Neill 
graduated in 1905. 



Fall in line, get a blue serge 
suit. 

Dr. Murrah was out of town 
several days last week. 

Bro. J. M. Morse, pastor of the 
First Methodist Church of Gulf- 
port, came up to see his two sons 
last week. 

Why is it that the tom cat 
makes discord when he sings ? Be- 
cause the horrid tomcat is filled 
with fiddle strings. — Ex. 

No game was ever worth a rap 

For rational man to play, 

Into which no accident, no mis- 
hap 

Could possibly find its way. 

—Ex. 

Friday morning just as the 
great chapel bell was giving out 
its summons for prayer, some one 
with an eagle eye noticed that the 
roof of the main building was in 
flames. Of course this fortunate 
finder thought it his duty to let 
every one know that the building 
was endangered by the flames and 
rightfully did he perform his du- 
ty. In a few moments every- 
thing was noise, disorder and ex 
eitement. One of the “preps” 
came very near being run ovei 
by Miss Baley. Some however 
were thoughtful enough to secure 
some buckets and rush up three 
flights of steps with the rapidity 
of a fire fighter, and well did 
they earn this name. 

Dr. Schwartz, who had scram- 
bled into the attic with a bucket 
of water was in the act of falling 
when .L B. Jone3 observed hat 
his beloved professor was in great 
need of assistance. In a moment 
Jones had made hs way through 
the crowd, rushed up the ladder 
and saved his friend from what 
might have proven a ratal fall. 

Bishop Ward, of Houston, Tex- 
as, will deliver the commence- 
ment sermon this year in the col- 
lege chapel, June 6th, 1909. 

Bishop Galloway and •''Major 
Millsaps were on the ^campus 
Thursday evening. We are very 
glad to know of the Bishop ’s im- 
provement. 

Dr. 1 1. L. C. Hunnieutt has gone 
to Atlanta for a meeting of the 
Board of Education. 

0 

The annual work has gone to 
the press. We are all glad to 
hear this, for the staff seems dis- 
irous of getting the annual out on 
time this year. 





Don’t walk by our beautiful 
display of wall papers without 
inspection. 



HALL-MILLER 
Paint and Glass Co. 



Wholesale Paints for All Purposes. 
Ill State Street. Phone 865. 




The Best Shoe 



for a College Boy is the 

HOWARD AND FOSTER 
$3 50 and $4 00 

Guaranteed to be as good as any 
other Shoe costing $5.00 or less. 

We are always glad to accommo- 
date Millsaps College boys when- 
ever we can. 

Come to see ns. 

TATOM SHOE CO. 



HR. C. ipepper 

foabertmsftet 

anti 

Matter 

523 KAST CAPITOL STREET 

Full Line Suit Cases and.Bags 

Fine Tailoring is Our Specialty 

Phone 1002 Jackson, Miss. 

RAZORS 

Honed 15e 

All Work Guaranteed 

J. S. Duke 



PURPLE AND WHITE 



Base Ball Shoes 
83.50 and 84.50 

Eyrich & Co. 



Mr. om Stenniss’ father and 
sister visited him last Saturday. 

Mr. G. C. Clark i3 sicq with 
pneumonia. 

Mr. Jim B. McClure, a young 
brother of Miss Edih McClure, 
was on the campus Saturday. 

Rev. Paul B. Kern, of Nashville, 
brother of Dr. A. A. Kern, has 
just closed a successful revival 
at the State University. Mr. 
Kern is also to hold a revival at 
the Mississippi A. & M. 

Bro. H. B. Watkins, of Hazle ? 
hurst, spent several days on the 
campus last week. Bro. Watkins 
was a graduate of the eleass of 
1899. 

Messrs. Stennis, Bob Ruff and 
Bob Mullins nave recently been 
invited into the mytic bonds of 
the Minnehaha Debating Society. 
This great honor conferred upon 
the young gentlemen is due to the 
influence of Miss McCluer. 

“Prep” Welch, of the senior 
class was sick for several days 
last week. 

Prof. Johnson, of the chair of 
Modem Languages at Mississippi 
College was on the campus Tues- 
day. He is an enthusiastic ad- 
mirer of athletics. He informs us 
that Mississippi College will play 
Jefferson College Saturday. 



Woman’s Department. 

Serious and almost threatening 
communications have come to us 
relative to woman’s suffrage. Now 
the editor of this paper has just 
procured for his office a nice new 
mg and sonm comfortable fur- 
niture of which we are justly 
proud. It would !>e quite ex- 
cruiating and deplorable, should 
anything befall them as a result 
of a female raid. We fear along 
this line the Executive head of 
this commonwealth of Mississippi, 
who, with the rest of the op- 
pressed and unrepresented de- 
cendants of Eve is more than 
likelyto give ns trouble. 

Consequently we have inaugu- 
rated this department of the 
Purple and White and because 
furthermore, we feel that woman 
should have a voice in every- 
thing. We feel that their opin- 
ions on subjects should be heard. 
We feel that they exert and in- 
fluence that is incalculable and 
should have some outlet. But 
these sentiments only spring from 
the knowledge that no matter 
what we did, or said, or prayed 



the condition would still exist 
Woman, we throw this depart- 
ment open to you. 

We have a series of letters 
which we will answer in course 
of time. Some relative to the 
husband’s misconduct, others as 
to th. latest way or parting the 
hair, of what is being worn, and 
many others. We will be glad to 
answer all communications 
through the columns of this pa- 
per. 

LOST — A Kappa Sigma badge 
with “A. U., ’08, L. C.” engraved 
on the back. Finder will be re- 
warded. Fulton Thompson. 

MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Jackson, Miss. 

Millsaps College offers courses leading 
to two degrees: B. A & B. S. 

For Catalogue, address 

W. B. MURR*H, Pres. 



GOTO 




Yf), J Refreshments 

EAT AT HS 



RESTAU RANT. 

Don’t Fail To See Him 
Before Having Your 
Receptions. 

Phone 201. 502 E. Capitol St. 



Visiting Cards. 

Don’t Fail to See Us Before 
Placing Your Order. 

Special Prices to College Boys 

Hederman Bros. 

JACKSON. MISS. 



GO TO 

JACKSON MERCANTILE • 
COMPANY. 

for Fancy Groceries and all kinds 
of Feed Stuffs. Same quality at 
lower prices. . Prompt deliverty is 
our motto. 

G. W. SISTRUNK 

Handles all Kinds of 

Good things to eat. 

Goods always fresh and prices 
reasonable . 

Nice line of Stationery on hand 
Give him a trial 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 

College Photographer. 

Jackson, 

Miss. 

Capitol St., near Bridge. 



WHEN DOWN TOWN 

Drop in at 

Your Old Friend’s Fountain, for 

BOTH HOT and COLD DRINKS 

J. S. MANGUM 
At Hunter ft McGee’s. 



When clothes are soiled 
Have them boiled 
Get Eizzy 
Ring Izzy 

Jackson Steam Laundry. 

PHONE 730 

b. 





THE PURPLE AND WHITE 

QUAE FIANT, EX HOC COGNOSCES. 



Volume One 



Jackson, Mississippi, April 9, 1909 



Number Fourteen 



ATHLETICS. 

Standing of the Teams Wednes- 
day Morning. 





P 


w 


L 


Pet. 


Junior-Senior 


..4 


3 


1 


.750 


Sophomores . . 


..3 


2 


1 


.666 


Freshmen . . . 


..3 


1 


2 


.333 


Preps 


.2 


0 


0 


.000 



Juniors 4, Sophs 3. 

Probably the best game of the 
season was played Monday after- 
noon, when the Juniors defeated 
the Sophomores for the first time 
in several seasons, either in foot- 
ball or in baseball. The game for 
the first few innings promised to 
be rather slow, but both pitchers 
began to speed up, and by the 
time the ninth inning was reach- 
ed, the side-lines were wild with 
spirit and enthusiasm. 

The score stood 3 to 2 in the 
Sophs favor when the Juniors 
came to the bat in the last half 
of the ninth inning. Aided by 
Buck’s error and by two timely 
hits, the upper classmen pushed 
two runs across the plate and the 
game was won. 

The box score tells the tale: 

; Sophs— AB. R. H. PO. A. E. 

Ricketts, c. lb. .3 1 1 8 3 0 

Jumper, ss 4 1 0 0 1 0 

Peeples, lb. c. .3 1 0 12 1 0 

Spann. 2b 4 0 2 2 1 0 

Galloway, cf. . . 4 0 0 0 0 1 

Davies, rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 

Lewis, 3b 4 0 0 3 1 1 

Haley, If 4 0 1 0 0 0 

Buck, p 4 0 0 0 2 1 

Junior-Sen. — AB. R. H. PO. A. E. 



Base on Balls — Applewhite 1, 
Buck 3. 

Hit by Pitcher — Stennis 2. 
Two-base Hit — Campbell. 
Double Play — Buck to Ricketts 
to Lewis. 

Passed Ball — Brooks. 

Umpire — Wimp. 



Juniors Win. 

It was principally due to the 
masterly pitching of Applewhite 
that the Juniors were enabled to 
win from the strong Prep team 
Thursday afternoon on April 1st. 
“Apple” never pitched in better 
form, and as a result of his work 
in the box, only two Preps se- 
cured bingles and fifteen men 
swung wide of the ball three 
times, and its whereabouts still 
remains a mystery to them. 

The score 9 to 5 does not indi- 
cate good pitching, hut these runs 



Preps.— AB. R. H. PO. A. E. 

Rankin, 2b 3 2 1 4 2 1 

Jones, ss 4 0 0 2 1 1 

Williams. 3b. ..4 2 0 4 1 2 

McCoy, c 4 0 0 10 .1 0 

Stennis, cf. ...4 0 0 0 0 0 

Smith, lb 4 0 0 6 0 2 

E. Johnson, If . .3 0 0 1 0 1 

Rush, rf -3 0 0 0 1 0 

Peeples, p 4 1 1 0 4 1 

Summary: 

Two-base Hits — Applewhite, 

Peeples. 

Sacrafice Hits — Jones, Rankin. 

Struck Out — By Applewhite 
15, by Peeples 10. 

Base on Balls — Applewhite 1, 
Peeples 1. 

Hit by Pitcher — Applewhite. 

Passed Balls — Brooks 2. 

Wild Throw — Applewhite. 

Umpire — Wimp. 

Time — 1 :50. 



two runs and won the game for 
the Sophs. 

Tn : s is the third game that the 
Freshmen have lost in the ninth 
inning after having had the game 
won up to that time. The Sophs 
seem to have the invaluable qual- 
ity of being able to hit in a pinch. 

Hits were evenly divided, but 
Therrell kept his well scattered 
until the ninth inning. 



Stennis. cf. 
Gass, 2b. 
Morse, lb. 
Brooks, c. 
Hand, cf. 
Campbell, rf 
Johnson, 3b 
Wh'tson. 2b 



.2 

.4 

.4 

.4 

.4 

.4 

2 

2 



0 0 2 0 0 

2 10 3 1 
1 2 15 0 0 

0 0 5 1 1 

0 0 0 0 0 

0 1 2 .0 0 

0 13 11 

1 0 0 5 0 



—NOTICE!—^ 

The Junior History Class will 
please meet at 11:10 today at the 
State Street car stop in order to 
go to Dr. Rowland’s Office. 

31. <£. oaalmslcj? 



Freshmen — 


AB 


. R 


II 


.PO. A 


.E. 


Ryals, rf. . . . 


. .4 


0 


0 


1 


0 


0 


Tnoms, ss. . . 


•3 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 


Morse, 2b. . . 


..4 


2 


2 


2 


3 


O 

A 


Carlisle, cf. . 


..2 


1 


0 


0 


1 


0 


Therrell, p. . 


..4 


1 


3 


2 


2 


0 


Collins, 3b. . . 


..4 


0 


0 


2 


3 


1 


Kirkland, lb. 


. .2 


0 


0 


3 


1 


0 


Cavett, lb. . . 


. .2 


0 


0 


4 


0 


0 


Huntley, If. . 


..4 


0 


0 


1 


0 


(1 


Holmes, c. . . . 


.4. 


0 


0 


9 


0 


1 


Sophs.— 


AB. 


R. 


II. 


PO. 


A. 


E. 


Ricketts, lb. . 


..3 


1 


0 


9 


0 


0 


Jumper, ss. . . 


.5 


0 


1 


1 


4 


2 


Peeples, c. . . . 


..4 


1 


0 


11 


4 


2 


Spann, 2b. . . 


..4 


2 


1 


3 


6 


0 


Galloway, cf. 


.4 


0 


1 


0 


0 


1 


Davies, 3b. . . 


.4 


1 


0 


1 


1 


1 


Lewis, rf. . . . 


.$ 


0 


1 


0 


0 


0 


Haley, If. ... 


.3 


0 


2 


2 


0 


0 


Buck, p 


.3 


I 


1 


0 


1 


1 



Applewhite, p. .3 0 0 0 2 1 

Summary: 

Hits Apportioned — Off Apple- 
white 6. off Buck 5. 

Struck Out — By Buck 9, by 
Applewhite 6. 



were made largely on errors by 
both teams. Peeples pitched a 
fairly good game for the Preps 
and secured a clean two-base hit 
in addition to his slab work. 

Morse at first played a swell 
game for the Juniors, batting like 
a fiend and running bases like 
l'ghtning. 

AB. R. H. PO. A. E. 



Juniors — 

Stennis, rf 
Gass, ss. . 

Morse, lb. 
Brooks, c. 

Crisler, c. 

Hand, cf. 
Johnson, 3b 
Campbell, rf. 
Whitson, 2b 
Applewhite, p. .3 



. . .0 
. . .5 
...5 
2 

. . .2 
...3 
. .3 
. .3 
. .4 



1 

1 

2 
0 
1 
1 
0 
1 
0 
1 



0 

0 

0 

1 

1 

0 

1 

0 

3 

3 



Freshmen Meet Defeat. 

Tne Freshmen team and their 
hard-luck pitcher, Therrell, met 
defeat at the hands of the Sopho- 
mores Wednesday afternoon 
March 31st. With one man down, 
and the bases full in the ninth 
inning, Ricketts struck out, but 
the catcher failed to hold the 
third strike, and Ricketts reach- 
ed first. Now the batter should 
have been out. since a man was 
on first base when the batter 
struck out — notwithstanding the 
fact that the third strike was a 
passed ball. But Umpire Jones 
was not informed as to this rule 
and he could not be influened to 
reverse his decision. The next 
man at bat got a hit which scored 



Summary : 

Two-base Hit3 — Morse, Gallo- 
way. 

Three-base Hit — Therrell. 

Stolen Bases — Ricketts, Pee- 
ples, Spann, Lewis, Haley 2, 
Thoms, Morse, Therrell. 

Struck Out — By Buck 12, by 
Therrell 6. 

Base on Balls — Bick 2, Ther- 
rell 2. 

Hit by Pitcher — Lewis. 

Double Play — Morse to Kirk- 
land to Collins. 

Passed Ball — Holmes. 

Umpire — L. B. Jones. 

Time — 1 :40. 



That Newspaper Report. 

Dear Sir — What is all this tom- 
myrot about the Millsaps ’Var- 
sity Baseball Team being defeated 
by the Jackson High School? I 
noticed an account cf the game in 
the Clarion-Ledger and have 
(Continued on page three). 




PURPLE AND WHITE 



The Purple and White 

Published Weekly by the Junior 
Class of Millsaps College 

ROBT. H. RUFF .... Edltor-ln-ChUf 
E. C. BREWER .... Associate Editor 
A. B. CAMPBELL .... Athletic Editor 
MISS MARGARET SAUMS .Social Editor 
D. R. WASSON .... Y. M. C. A. Editor 

JOHN GASS Local Editor 

W. E. PHILLIPS Loca Editor 

M. L. NEILL Business Mgr 

A. F. KELLY .... Assistant Bus. Mgr 

All matter for publication should be ad- 
dressed to the Editor-in-Chief. 

All business communications should be ad- 
dressed to the Business Mgr., M. L. Neill. 

Entered as seacond class matter January 22, 
1909, at the postoffice at Jackson Miss., 
under act of Congress, March, 3,11879 

Single Copy Per Annum 50 Cents 
Two Copies Per Annum 75 Cents 

EDITORIAL. 



A Great Need. 

In this article it is not our in- 
tention to speak ofc the need of 
intercollegiate athletics, a new 
“gym” outfit or an athletic field. 
What we do intend to speak of i3 
something of importance and 
something that has never before 
been brought before the minds 
of the faculty and the student 
body. This great need is the need 
of a means of lighting up the col- 
lege campus. 

As it has been heretofore jnd 
is now, the campus is unlighted. 
Not only would two or three 
lights add much to the looks of 
the campus and be of great bene- 
t to the students and faculty, 
but they would be of the great- 
est service to strangers and visi- 
tors. It may seem easy for stu- 
dents who know every foot of the 
campus to go about at night but 
for a person who has never been 
on the campus and who happens 
here some dark night it is no easy 
task to find the place that he is 
looking for. 

In a few days the city of Jack- 
son will award the contract for 
the street lights for the next ten 
years. The cost of one of these 
lights per year will be about $85 
or $90. In no better way do we 
see how two or three hundred 
dollars could be spent each year 
than in having the campus light- 
ed up. Boys, let's try to get the 
faculty to put in an order for 
these lights in the contract which 
will be made in a few days. 

We would suggest four are 
lights, one at the ear stop on 
North State, another at the Dor- 
mitory and one each in front of 
the main building and Science 
Hall. If the proper pressure is 
brought to bear the city will put 



the one on North State at the 
car stop and if the college will 
erect three more, our campus will 
be well lighted. We have hear! 
numbers of people from the city 
city say that they never came to 
the attractions at the college at 
night because of the darkness of 
the campus. 



James Farmer Duke. 

On last Wednesday night a 
vast throng of people assembled 
in the college auditorium to see 
that brilliant young scientist, 
James Farmer Duke, perform his 
wonders. Long before the hour 
for the exhibition the throng had 
assembled and it was a beautiful 
spectacle that was presented to 
the eyes — boys waving banners 
and screaming with enthusiasm, 
were joined by men from all 
walks of life, while Belhaven and 
others sat charmed, such a won- 
derful sight to see. 

Promptly at 8:30 o’clock the 
young genius came forward 
sweetly smiling and coquettishly 
announced his program. It was 
great! Those who saw Griffith 
say that his work stands in the 
same relation to Duke’s that a 
cattle ear does to a parlor sleeper 
they are both on the same track 
and that’s all. Others, who have 
shown a disposition to be dognis- 
tic, insist that the relationship is 
better shown by their “rat trap 
and pipe organ figure” — Mr. 

Griffith being the rat trap of 
course. 

There are many things that 
might be assigned as reasons for 
this remarkable success, but suf- 
fice it to say that the enthusiastic 
and sympathetic concourse, the 
character of subjects and the 
financial agent, insured his suc- 
cess from the first. Among those 
who co-operated with the preco- 
cious young scientist was Mr. A. 
Boyd Campbell, of Hesterville, 
who, according to all reports, is 
fast forging to the front in things 
pertaining to science, and after 
seeing that scientific shape of the 
head, no one felt disposed to ques- 
tion his prowess in the ’depart- 
ment of science. Other notables 
such as Messrs. Melvin Cooper, 
Charles Anderson and Stephen 
Davies, of Sicily Island, La., ap- 
peared during the performance. 

Perhaps the feature of, the oc- 
casion (excepting the aforesaid 
precocious young scientist) was 
the financial agent. Some thought 



that it was Gov. Noel — tno know- 
ing of course that the Governor’s 
head is as devoid of hair as the 
egg — for they said he had a wise 
look, while others thriught that 
it was J. P. Morgan. However, 
by much tact the Purple and 
White is enabled to state posi- 
tively that it was Mr. Ant B. 
Jones, of Madison, Mississippi. 



Galloway Anniversary. 

Tonight will be the sixteenth 
anniversary of the Galloway Lit- 
erary Society. The program prom- 
ises to be one of unusual interest. 
There are three speakers, the an- 
niversarian, the orator and the 
outside speaker. As anniversarian 
of the occasion the society made 
a very wise choice in the selec- 
tion of Mr. B. F. Witt, the orator, 
Mr. T. A. Stennis, is also a man 
of rare abilities. Prof. J. N. 
Powers, the outside speaker, is 
one who needs no recommenda- 
tion, most of the boys have heard 
him speak before and it is evi- 
dent that he was liked for he has 
been chosen again. Mr. H. M. 
Frizell is president, and R. Hom- 
eric Ruff vice president of the 
occasion. 



Y. M. C. A. 

At the business meeting of the 
Association Friday night the pres- 
ident made the following appoint- 
ments of committees: Devotion- 
al. R. M. Brown, chairman; Wro- 
ten; Bible Study, D. R. Wasson, 
chairman; Ford Bufkin, Coggin 
and Brown ; Mission Study, R. H. 
Ruff, chairman; W. B. Lewis and 
Monger; Membership, A. C. An- 
derson, chairman; C. E. Johnson, 
Cain and Haley; Finance, F. S. 
Williams. J. B. Kirkland, Carlisle 
and E. R. Holmes; Social, A. B. 
Campbell, chairman; T. W. Lew- 
is ; Hand Book, M. H. Neill, chair- 
man, Frizell and Brewer. 

We were very glad to have 
Prof. Noble address us Sunday 
night. He knows college boys and 
the temptations that come to 
them, so he was well able to deal 
with his subject, “The Boy Who 
Goes to the Bad.” He showed us 
how it is possible, and very often 
happens, for a boy coming to 
college from a home and com- 
munity where strict Christian 
rules are observed and every in- 
fluence for good has been thrown 
around him, to be led into sin. 



How that at home the boy saw 
only negroes or low class men en- 
gaged in playing cards and doing 
other things of the k»nd, but that 
when he comes to college he finds 
the most popular men, perhaps, 
engaged in these things He begins 
to think that probably they are 
not so bad after all. He feels 
that his life has been too narrow, 
that he has hung on to his moth! 
er ’3 apron strings too long, and 
wishing to gain the friendship of 
this class of boys, and thinking 
that by getting in with them he 
would also become popular, be al- 
lows himself to take part with 
them. 

As he says the average boy is 
what his surroundings make him. 
So, as he said again, we ought to 
be very careful as to the kind of 
influence we throw around a boy. 
Every man is his brother’s keep- 
er. We will be held accountable, 
to a certain extent, for the sins 
of our fellowman. Our every act 
is watched closely by somebody. 
We may consider the act very in- 
significant, but it may be suffi- 
cient to start som® *me on the 
downward road. For instance a 
Christian may go to the theatre. 
It may be a good 3how and he 
can’t see any harm In if, but some 
boy who is being guided some- 
what by his influence sees him 
go to the show, and decides that 
if that man can go to a show it’s 
no harm for me to go. He doesn’t 
consider the kind of show, but 
says he is going to the show. So 
he goes and once he is started he 
| continues to go and from the show 
he. goes to the pool room and 
other places. Then we might say 
he has gone to the “bad.” 

So he says the boy is not so 
much to blame as the older boy3 
who are “on to the ropes,” and 
who throw this evil influence 
around him. For every new man 
is in a sense “green” and he is 
going to watch the oiq. boys until 
he gets on to their way of doing. 

Mr. Smith, a missionary secre- 
tary of the Baptist Church, paid 
us a visit Monday morning. Aft- 
er addressing the student body 
in chapel he met the student Vol- 
unteer band. He urged upon 
them the necessity of developing 
their three-fold nature, the physi- 
cal, intellectual and spiritual, in 
order tot be a successful mis- 
sionary. 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 






h 






ATHLETICS. 

(Continued from page one), 
heard it mentioned several times 
by other parties. I have been an 
enthusiastic supporter of inter- 
collegiate athletics for Millsaps, 
but if she cannot get out a ’Var- 
sity that can put it over a high 
school team, I think that the time 
is not nearly ripe for inter-col- 
legiate games. 

An Alumnus. 

The above is one of the echoes 
of that ball game Saturday be- 
tween nine Millsaps College boys 
and a team composed of eight 
High School boys and one fast 
amateur. To our “Alumnus” we 
wish to remind him that he read 
the account of this game in the 
Clarion-Ledger, which ought to 
be sufficient proof that it was as 
nearly incorrect as possible. The 
facts about the game were these: 
The High School team was sched- 
uled to play the I. C. Railroad 
Clerks at League Park Saturday 
afternoon. For some reason the 
clerks were unable to play, so the 
manager of the High School team 
phoned Manager Collins of the 
Freshmen, and askec him to give 
them a game for practrce. It was 
agreeable with Collins, but he 
could not get all his Freshmen 
players together, so he substituted 
one Prep and two Sophomores to 
was made up then it was not 
make out the nine. As the team 
nearly as strong as the regular 
Freshmen team. The gam? ended 
8 to 7 in favor of the High 
School, and at once a howl was 
started that the Jackson High 
School had defeated the Mill- 
saps ’Varsity team. Since that 
time the tale has been growing 
and growing until it has now 
reached mammoth proportions. It 
it on the lips of every kid that 
claims High School, and even the 
street rats have taken up the mi- 
raculous report of the Clarion- 
Ledger. 

We will further inform the 
Alumnus that Millsaps has no 
’Varsity baseball team, and that 
if she had one she would never 
put herself low enougn to cross 
bats with the Jacksoon High 
School team, which team has been 
twice defeated this year by our 
Preps. 

This little affair has worried us 
more than it has anybody else 
because it effects us most. Just 
who is responsible for the reports 
of these games is not known. If 



it is the Jackson High School 
bunch, our teams should refuse 
to play the many more. If it is 
in the imagination of a reporter 
that these reports originate, he 
should be “mopped up with,” for 
this is not the first time such a 
lie has been published. 



From the Big Colleges. 

I 

The Princeton 1909 football 
team will be under the direction 
of Jim McCormick, the great all- 
American fullback of several sea- 
sons ago. 

Hughey Jennings, the famous 
manager of the Detroit Tigers 
end an alumnus of Cornell Uni- 
versity, spent several days at 
Ithaca recently assisting Coach 
Coogan with the baseball players. 

Tad Jones, the former Yale 
captain, and foremost college ath- 
lete in America, will coach the- 
Svracuse football warriors next 
fall, succeeding his brother How- 
ard, who goes to Yale. 

The Pennsylvania baseball team 
is to make a Southern trip this 
year, playing some of the fore- 
mast college teams in Dixie. 

It seems that Sewanee’s football 
team "will be composed princi- 
pally of members of last year’s 
football team, but reports are 
that the prospects are very good 
for a winning team. 

Mississippi College at Clinton 
has the best ball team in her his- 
tory, and especially strong is 
their main battery. 



He Prayed Over It. 

That there is nothing essential- 
ly irreligious in athletes and ath- 
letics is indicated by the follow- 
ing story taken from the Sunday 
School Times of April 11th. Sam 
Jones used to say in order to il- 
lustrate the sinfulness of the mod- 
ern dance that he couldn’t put 
his arm around his own wife and 
say the Lord’s prayer. If a man 
can earnestly pray <jver a foot- 
ball game his conscience couldn’t 
be very bad. 

Tad Jones’ Prayer. — The story 
was told on the Yale campus re- 
cently about one passage in the 
speech of Tad Jones, the Yale 
quarterback, at the Yale banquet 
in Boston after the game with 



Harvard on Saturday night that 
interested all the Yale men that 
heard it. Jones made a good 
speech, full of enthusiasm, and 
then stopped. Every one thought 
that he had finished, but he re- 
mained on his feet. Then he be- 
gan again slowly and with some 
hesitation. “It’s a tunny thing to 
tell here, fellows, but I want to 
say that this morning I felt that 
I did not have it,” meaning that 
he felt he was not able to d? !.is 
part in the coming contest. “I 
went to my room and prayed, 
and when I came downstairs I 
felt that I had it.” Jones sat 
down amid a dead silence. The 
statement coming from a man 
who is at the head of religious 
life at Yale, and of whose sin- 
cerity there could be no doubt, 
impressed every one in the room. 
The silence lasted for nearly half 
a minute, and then the applause 
came. — Juniata Rohrback. From 
the New York Sun. 



Officers Elected. 

After listening to a very fine 
declamation, oration and a well 
prepared debate the members of 
the Lamar Society elected the fol- 
lowing term officers: Vice presi- 
dent, A. B. Campbell; secretary, 
Savage; censor, G. C. Clark; 
critic, R. J. Bingham ; door keep- 
er, J. W. Green; monthly orator, 
Augustus Fredericus Kelly. The 
members are to be congratulated 
for electing such splendid officers. 



Social. 

On Saturday evening the boys 
of Phi Delta entertained a few of 
their friends at a delightful chaf- 
ing dish party. Their hall, al- 
ways atractive and cozy, was ren- 
dered even more so for this occa- 
sion by the extensive use of black 
and gold, the fraternity colors. 
Several young ladies were pres- 
ent and as many of the Phi Delta 
brothers, all very ably chaper- 
oned by Prof. Erwin and his 
charming young wdfe. 

The principal amusement was 
of course found in the chafing 
dishes themselves. All sorts of 
dainties were prepared, with such 
skill that one could hardly con- 
sider the young ladies amateur 
cooks. Besides these refreshments, 
a delicious punch whs served and 
late in the evening a course of 
cake and cream. 

Every one thoroughly enjoyed 



the short hours thus spent and 
the girls have with one assent 
voted the Phi Delta boys excellent 
hosts. 



Resolutions. 

Whereas, It has pleased God 
in His wise providence to take 
from this life the beloved mother 
of our friend and classmate Mr. 
Leggett, 

Therefore, be it resolved by 
the Senior Class of Millsaps Col- 
lege : 

First, That we bow in submis- 
sion to the will of our Heavenly 
Father as expressed in this dis- 
pensation of His providence, 
knowing that He does not will- 
ingly afflict His people, but in 
His own way and time makes all 
things work together for good 
to them tha,t love Him. 

Second, That we hereby express 
to our classmate and to those who 
suffer with him, our sincere sym- 
pathy, praying that God may 

minister to them the abundant 
consolations of His Grace and 
Spirit. 

Third, That these resolutions be 
published in the Collegian, the 
Purple and White, and that a 
copy of these resolutions be sent 
to our bereaved friend. 

Miss Bertha Ricketts, 
T. L. Bailey, 

R. J. Mullins. 



Hon. Ligh Roberts, a late Mill- 
saps student, who without doubt 
is one of nature’s natural noblest 
noblemen, is at present connected 
with the Jackson Street Railway 
Company in the capacity of con- 
ductor. 

Break a nice fresh egg or two 
Beat them, not too fast, 

Add some milk and sugar, 

Then, not least thougn last 
Haul the cherished bottle forth/’ 
Draw its stopper, and 
Add unto the mixture straight 
As much as you can stand. 

the same internally 
Whenever you feel blue 
And it’ll make the landscape take 
Quite a different hue. 



Several weeks ago Tom Bailey 
advertised the fact in the Purple 
and White that he had lost his 
umbrella, and requested the find- 
er to keep it. He now says : “The 
finder has done so. It pays to 
advertise.” 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 




JACKSON MERCANTILE 



Cheer up! “Sophie,” you can’t 
win all the time. 



COMPANY 



Bro. R. N. Brown preached at 
the Orphanage Sunday evening. 



for Fancy Groceries and all kinds 
of Feed Stuffs. Same quality at 
lower prices. . Prompt deliverty is 



Mr. R. C. Pugh, of the Junior 
Class, is still at home. 



is the latest addition to this fam ous family of picture and fun 
makers, making a splendid picture, easy to operate and cheap to 
run. Let us snow you. 



our motto. 



He unconsciously kissed her. 
— Sophomore Story. 



Handles all Kinds of 



Prof. Ricketts will conduct the 
Y. M. C. A. services Sunday night. 



One of the best signs of spring 
is to see a freshman read his mail 
and smile. 



Goods always fresh and prices 
reasonable . 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Jackson, VI if 8. 

♦ 

Millsaps College oilers courses leading 
to two degrees: B. A. & B. S. 

For Catalogue, address 

W. B. MURRVH, Pre*. 



Mr. W. C. Williams was on the 
campus last week. Wirt is prin- 
cipal of the Edwards High School 
and graduated at Millsaps in 
1907. 



Nice line of Stationery on hand 
Give him a trial 



E. M. Livingston and C. J. Mur- 
phy went home last Wednesday 
night. 



Well can Boyd Campbell be 
called a son of swat for the smash- 
ing two-bagger in the last half of 
the ninth that brought victory to 
his team. 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 
College Photographer. 

Jackson, 

Miss. 

Capitol St., near Bridge. 



It is very probable that the 
State contest will go to Columbus 
this year. 



Charlie Hand is quite anxious 
to know if there are any snakes 
in Ireland. 



The Rev. Dr. Smith, editorial 
secretary of the Baptist church, 
gave a short talk Monday morn- 
ing at chapel on the “coming of 
the kingdom.” 



Will some one tell Randolph 
Moore who was the father of 
Zebedee’s children. 



Will Dacell had a pain in his 
back one day last weeK, and 
went to the „ soda dispenser at 
Hunter & McGee’s and asked him 
if he didn’t have appendicitis. 



Don’t Fail To See Him 
Before Having Your 
Receptions. 

Phone 201. 502 E. Capitol St. 



Honed 15e 



Mr. R. B. Sharborough, of the 
Senior Class, was sick several 
days last week. 



All Work Guaranteed 



J. S. Duke 



Mr. A. J. Noland, one of Louis- 
iana’s foremost planters, was in 
the city this week visiting his 
daughter at Belhaven. Come 
again, we are always glad to see 
you. 



Mr. DeWitt James went to 
French Camp last week to see his 
brother who is quite ill. 



Bros. Raney and Witt con- 
ducted the devotional services at 
Ridgeland last Sunday. 



Jackson can’t live without 
baseball. A City League has been 
organized recently for the amuse- 
ment and pastime of the fans. 
Tliis is a fine way to develop some 
big leaguers at home. 



Mr. W. C. Legett, who went 
home last week on account of 
his mother’s illness, has returned. 

■ | IP 'W. i LI* . .1 

Messrs. C. E. Johnson and Guy 
Malloy were initiated into the 
ranks of the Kappa Alpha fra- 
ternity Saturday night. 



Don’t walk by our beautiful 
display of wall papers without 
inspection. 

HALL-MILLER 
Paint and Glass Co. 

Wholesale Paints for All Purposes. 
Ill State Street. Phone 865. 



HR. C. ipepper 

feabertmsbet 



for a College Boy is the 

HOWARD AND FOSTER 



We are requested to announce 
that all of the manuscript for 
Clark Essay Medal must be in by 
the first Saturday in May. 



$3 50 and $4 00 

Guaranteed to be as good as any 
other Shoe costing $5.00 or less. 

We are always glad to accommo- 
date Millsaps College boys when- 



When clothes are soiled 
Have them boiled 
Get Eizzy 
Ring Izzy 



fatter 



523 EAST CAPITOL STREET 

Full Line Suit Cases and Bags 



Mr. D. T. Ruff, a member of 



ever we can. 

Come to see us. 

TATOM SHOE CO. 



the class of ’08, was on the cam- 
pus Saturday. Tom is the prin- 
j cipal of the Camden High School. 



Fine Tailoring is Our Specialty 

Phone 1002 Jackson, Miss. 



Jackson Steam Laundry. 

PHONE 730 





THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



QUAE FIANT, EX HOC COGNOSCES. 



VOLUME ONE 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, APRIL 16, 1909 



NUMBER FIFTEEN 



ATHLETICS. 

Standing of the Teams Wednes- 
day Morning: 

P. W. L. Pet. 

Sophomores . . .4 3 1 .750 

Juniors S 4 2 .666 

r Freshmen 6 3 3 .500 

‘V Preps 4 0 4 .000 



Juniors Get Called Game. 

On last Thursday in a game rife 
[■ with erors and over abundant 
j, with disputes, t'he Juniors and 
^ Preps mixed in a desperate pitch- 
f ers' battle. Neither pitcher was 
L m his usual form, and each yield- 
i ed hits at critical times. The 
| Juniors practically won the game 
[ in the first inning, scoring six of 
I their seven runs. 

K Costly errors and all-around 
t poor support proved Rankin’s un- 
i doing, hut after the first inning 
Lie succeeded in retiring twelve 
Ouniors to the bench empty- 
[ handed. When the ninth inning 
['started, darkness had crept over 
the diamond and the players could 
[Jiardly be distinguished. Before 
three men were out, the Preps 
|pu3hed one run across the plate 
[ and tied the score. By the time 
[the Juniors came to hat it was 
[ entirely too dark to play and 
! Umpire Collins called the game 
fhack to the eighth inning where 
I the Juniors were ahead and thus 
I the game went to them. 



KPreps — 


AB. R. H. PO. A. E. 


[ Peeples, c. . 


..5 1 1 


10 


2 


0 


! Jones, ss. . . . 


..5 1 1 


1 


0 


2 


^.Williams, 2b. 


..5 1 2 


1 


0 


1 


g McCoy, 3b. . . 


..4 1 1 


2 


3 


0 


[Stennis, cf. . . 


..4 0 0 


0 


0 


0 


[Smith, lb. . . 


..3 1 1 


9 


0 


1 


'Johnson, If. . . 


..2 0 0 


1 


0 


0 


’Bush. rf. . . . 


..4 0 0 


0 


0 


0 


Bankin, p. . . 


..1 1 0 


0 


2 


0 


: Juniors — 


AB. R, H. 


PO. A. E. 


; Stennis, If. . . 


..3 1 1 


0 


0 


0 


1 Gass, ss 


..3 O 0 


0 


1 


3 


^ Morse, lb. . . 


..3 2 1 10 


0 


0 


Brooks, c. . . 


..4 1 0 10 


1 


2 


Hand, cf. . . . 


..310 


1 


0 


1 


Campbell ". 


..411 


0 


0 


Q 



Johnson, 3b. ...3 1 0 1 2 0 

Whitson, 2b. . .4 0 1 2 1 0 

Applewhite, p..3 0 0 0 1 0 

Summary. 

Hits Apportioned — Off Apple- 
white 6, off Rankin 4. 

Three-base Hit — McCoy. 

Two-base Hit — Tom Stennis. 

Sacrifice Hits — Gass, Morse. 

Struck Out — By Applewhite 11, 
by Rankin 12. 

Base on Balls — Applewhite 5, 
Rankin 3. 

Hit by Pitcher — T. Stennis. 

Umpire — Wimp. 

Time— 1 :19. 



Leaders Drop One. 

1 * i 

About the punkest article in 
baseball of the season was seen 
by at least twenty fans on the 
local diamond Monday afternoon. 
It was the occasion of the 
slaughter of the Junior-Senior 
team bv the Freshmen. When 
time was called at the end of the 
sixth inning on account of dark- 
ness, the score stood 11 to 5 in 
favor of the Fresh ones. Had the 
game proceeded to the ninth in- 
ning, it would have taken a math- 
ematician to figure out the score, 
and an expert to count the errors. 

The Juniors claim the honor 
of running up the highest num- 
ber of errors, and thus presenting 
a game to their opponents and 
lowering their own percentage. 
Hits were about evenly divided 
but Therrell kept his well scat- 
tered until the fifth when the Jun- 
iors got three straight singles. 

This is the first time that the 
upper classmen have shown such 
miserable form, and the other 
teams are now predicting a slump 
for them. This is the Juniors’ 
tale of woe. 

Freshmen — AB. R. H. PO. A. E. 

Thoms, ss., 3 2 1 0 1 0 

Converse, cf. . .4 1 1 0 0 1 

Therrell, p 3 1 0 0 5 0 

Morse, 2b 3 1 1 2 0 4 

Collins, 3b 4 1 2 2 2 3 

Kirkland, lb. . .3 1 0 7 0 2 



Ryals, rf. ... 


2 


1 


1 


0 


0 


0 


Brabston, If. 


.3 


1 


0 


1 


0 


0 


Holmes; c. . . 


.3 


1 


1 


5 


1 


1 


Juniors— 


AB 


R. 


H. PO. A. E. 


Stennis, If. . . 


.4 


1 


0 


2 


1 


0 


Gass, ss 


.4 


0 


2 


0 


1 


0 


Brooks, c. . . 




.3 


1 


3 


0 


3 


Hand, cf. ... 


.3 


2 


0 


1 


0 


1 


Campbell, rf. 


.3 


i 


1 


0 


0 


0 


Johnson, 3b. 


.3 


0 


0 


2 


0 


0 


Wnitson, 2b. 


2 


0 


0 


0 


2 


3 


Applewhite, p 


.3 


0 


1 


0 


0 


0 



Summary. 

Hits Apportioned — Off Apple- 
white 7, off Therrell 5. 

Three-base Hit — Wimp. 

Two-base Hits — Morse, Brooks. 

Struck Out — By Applewhite 4, 
by Therrell 4. 

Stolen Bases — All who reached 
first. 

Sacrifice Hits — Converse and 
Thoms. 

Umpire — R. O. Jones’ brother. 

Time— 1 :40. 



From the Track. 

Mr. Welch, the enthusiastic 
manager of the track team, has 
handed us the following list of 
prizes and the events for which 
they are offered: 

Ten dollars in gold will be giv- 
en by Taylor-Wills for the win- 
ner of the mile race. 

Mr. Daniel, the college photog- 
rapher, is offering ten dollars for 
the best all round “gym” man. 

A fine box of cigars will be 
awarded to the winner of the 
hundred-yard dash by Hunter & 
McGee. 

To the winner of the quarter 
mile race, Mr. S. J. Johnson will 
give a pair of $4 shoes. 

Mr. R. C. Pepper is offering a 
$3.50 hat for one event, and Mr. 
Fransioli offers a $2. baseball 
glove to the winner of another. 

Mr. Welch says that he has 
been promised quite a number of 
other prizes but he is not pre- 
pared at present to state what 
they are. 



This is quite an attractive list 
and should he an incentive to the 
boys to train earnestly. They are 
going to be won by the men who 
work hardest for them. We 
should have at least fifty men 
out on the athletic field every 
afternoon. Mr. Welch and Prof. 
Noble are working earnestly and 
we should show our appreciation 
by our co-operation. Field Day 
is not going to be the success that 
it should be unless we work to- 
ward that end. We want to es- 
tablish some records that we will 
not be ashamed of but put it 
down that we will never do it 
without hard and consistent work 
— so get busy ! 



Be Careful With the M. 

It has been noticeable recently 
that our block “M’s” have been 
used rather carelessly, and have 
been worn by men who never 
played a game of football in their 
lives. A stop should be put to 
this at once before it goe any 
further. eLt us nip the trouble 
in the bud. Let it be distinctly 
understood that the letters are to 
be worn only by men who have 
won them. It is an injustice to 
these men for others to wear the 
monogram, and they should make 
it a personal matter. The only 
way for this matter to be handled 
is by the boys themselves. So 
let’s get busy and protect our 
“M.” 



Freshmen Again Met Defeat. 

The Freshmen team was admin- 
istered a 7 to 6 defeat by the 
Spohs on Wednesday, April 7. 

The Freshmen took the lead, and 
until the eighth inning it looked 
as if victory was theirs. But the 
Sophs had a batting rally in the 
eighth and ninth, and overcame 
the big lead of the Freshie3. 

Hits were in abundance - on 
either side, and the game was 
rather slow and void of sensa- ^aa co 
tions with the exception of or 
pretty double play. 

(Continued on page three). 



PURPLE AND WHITE 



'• 



The Purple aud White 

Published Weekly by the Junior 
Class of Millsaps College 

ROBT. H. RUFF . Editor-ln-Chl«f 

E. C. BREWER .... Associate Editor 
A. B. CAMPBELL .... Athletic Editor 
MISS MARGARET SAUM8 . Social Editor 
D. R. WASSON .... Y. M. C. A. Editor 

JOHN GASS Local Editor 

W. E. PHILLIPS Loca Editor 

M. L. NEILL Business Ugr 

A. F. KELLY .... Assistant Bus. Mffr 

All matter for publication should be ad- 
dressed to the Editor-In-Chief. 

All business communications should be ad- 
dressed to the Business Mgr., M. L. Neill. 

Entered as seacond class matter January 22, 
1909, at the postoffice at Jackson Miss., 
under act of Congress, March, 3,41879 

Single Copy Per Annum 50 Cents 
Two Copies Per Annum 75 Cents 

EDITORIAL. 



We note with more than pass- 
ing concern the small amount of 
interest the boys are taking in 
their work and college affairs. 
Take the Galloway' anniversary 
last Friday night, no interest 
whatever was manifested in it. 
A little more than half of the 
students out at one of the anni- 
versaries, one of the biggest 
events of our college y r ear. 

Very little interest was mani- 
fested in it either by the faculty' 
or student body. So long as such 
conditions exist we will be very' 
slow in turning out men who will 
turn the world topsy turvy. When 
the society confers the highest 
honor in her power by placing 
them on her anniversary pro- 
gram, nothing should prevent 
them from doing the very best in 
their power. They not only owe 
it to themselves but to their so- 
ciety and college. Then the whole 
3tudent body should back them 
up and see that everybody is in- 
vited and do all possible to make 
the occasion a success. 

Besides when we invite a prom- 
inent speaker to deliver our ad- 
dress we surely ought to give him 
a good audience. He has to go 
to trouble aud expense to be 
with us and we can’t afford to 
miss it. 

So let’s g"t busy and make 
our next anniversary on the 24th 
a success. Our representative to 
the State contest is the anniver- 
sarian, so come out and hear the 
speech which is to take the State 
medal. 



' Remember the Filed Day and 
Patr 4 * ~ them 

'■ TATOM SHOE CO. 



Junior-Senior Historical Trip. 

On hte 30th of April Prof. 
Walmsley intendsto take the- 
Junior and Senior historvclasses 
to Natchez to visit the historical 
places and 1.1am something of 
their history. Very low rates 
have been secured from the rail- 
road and the trip mu oe taken 
at a very small cost. 

Besides seeing historical things 
and learning something of their 
history the boys will, without 
doubt, be very* glad to know that 
Prof. Todd, of Stanton College, 
has kindly consented to allow his 
girls to go with the boys and also 
learn some h'storv. 

Another thing of interest at 
this time will be the State Teach- 
ers’ Association which is to be 
held in Natchez. At this associa- 
tion there will be the most prom- 
inent educators of the South. Ad- 
dresses will be delivered by very 
able speakers. 



Why not a Y. M. C. A. build- 
ing? 



The Turkish Parliament has re- 
cently' passed a bill making three 
Sundays in a week. Now 
wouldn’t it be great if we were 
only' in Turkey, three Sundays 
and of course three Saturdays. 



We are glad to note that the 
college authorities are using some 
paint this week. Give us some 
lights and we will have one of 
the prettiest campuses in the 
State. 



The Louisiana State University 
has inaugurated boat racing this 
year. This is a fine sport and 
should be taken up by all the 
Southern colleges where it is 
possible. L. S. U. is to be com- 
mended for the fine start she has 
made. 



One of the most novel features 
in Southern education is that 
which Rodner College at Nash- 
ville offers. They' give the entire 
student body a six week’s tour 
of the United States. This year 
they visit the States west of the 
Mississippi. 



The University' has at last de- 
cided to accept $25,000 of An- 
drew’s tainted money for a li- 
brary. We presume it has lost its 
taint in the past few years or 
they' would not be accepting it 



so graciously' now. After all we 

■ ?*• 

are not the : chtcfest of sinners. 



Editor of Hoodlum : 

My Dear Sir — I was very 
much surprised when I saw how 
your paper treated the entertain- 
ment given by Mr. Duke in the 
chapel Tuesday nignt. As I un- 
derstood the article which was 
beaded, “James Farmer Duke,” 
it was meant to be sarcastic, and 
in most places it was without the 
semblance of truth. I ctoubt very' 
seriously if the reporter who 
wrote that article was even pres- 
ent at the entertainment. I think 
that it shows a very' bad spirit 
for a talented, but skeptical 
writer to treat an honest endeav- 
or to help our athletic associa- 
tion in this manner. 

Every one knows that the en- 
tertainment was a great success, 
and all present went away highly 
satisfied and without a kick, or 
sarcastic remark of any kind. 
Mr. Duke has been pronounced 
very talented in the art of hypno- 
tism by competent judges, and 
he clearly' demonstrated that fact 
Tuesday night by keeping twelve 
young men completely' in his 
power and under his control for 
over two hours. The antics of 
the subjects were so ludicrous 
that the audience was roaring 
with laughter throughout the en- 
tire program. 

The entertainment was given 
for the sole purpose of repleting 
the treasury of the athletic asso- 
ciation, and although quite a nice 
little sum was realized. Mr. Duke 
refused to take one cent for his 
services. 

Prof. Walmsley, the secretary 
and treasurer of the association, 
helped to work up the entertain- 
ment, and he feels very much in- 
debted to Duke, as should every 
boy in Millsaps College who be- 
longs to the athletic association 
and wants to see it pay its debts. 

Now I write this article in jus- 
tification of Mr. Duke, and want 
to assure him that the account 
ofthe entertainment which was 
published in the Purple and 
White one week ago does not 
meet with the approval of the 
boys of Millsaps College. 

One Who Was Present, or 
A Student. 



Woman’s Department. 



In connection with this iep 






ment, which we inaugurated somshj 
time since, we beg Jo state that ; 
according to the Ladies’ Home j 
Journal. Woman’s Home Com- 
panion, etc., the following is the; 
style for the spring: 



“Hats will be worn, as will- 

also manv other articles of cloth-- 
' 

ing, dresses, shoes, stockings, rats 
and puffs. Pink lingerie will be 
worn over petticoats. The peek-j 
a-boo shirt wa’st has been trans-J 
formed bv the directoire and 
sheath-gown.* The spring bon- 1 
nets this year are for sale at all < 
dry goods stores. The best wayj 
to press dresses is with an iron.” j 
We wish to publish several let- 
ters which we have received: 

a 



Mathiston, Miss., April 4, 1909. 



Dear Editor — I wish yon would 
send me the lattest pattern as to 
how I can dress my hair in the l 
figure 8. 

Now what in the world do we j 
know about hair dressing — espe- ] 
cially how to dress in the figure! 
8. We will take the suggestion! 

offered by another editor of a 

j 

woman’s paper, and advise that 



she separate it into four parts, 



then double it. 



Here is another : 



Rust on, La., April 7 , 1909. 



Dear Editor — My husband has 



been straying far from the paths j 
of soberness. He never comes-: 
home till morning and then in a 
verv debauched and intoxicated-; 
condition. My heart cries out for 



pity so I write to you for advice.' 

Now, what does the glorious 
editor of this brilliant publica- 
tion know of intoxication. If we 
advise her to use violence or a 
hat pin, we would get in trouble 
from the male division. As be- 
fore published, we have just pro- 
cured a new rug for the editor’s 
cot, and deplorable indeed would 
be the destruction of this rug. 
Again if we advise her to move 
out of civilization to Arkansas 
where there is no booze, we would 
find trouble from her on the 
grounds that we had curtailed 
her husband’s liberty. So we 
suggest that, in self defense she 
take him to the Y. M. C. A. at 
night. 



V . 4. 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



ATHLETICS. 

(Continued from page one). 

Morse was spiked in the fifth 
inning — Huntley replacing him at 
second. 

Umpire Peeples took a step in 
the right direction when he put a 
sudden stop to the grumblings of 
a chronic kicker on decisions. 

This is the story of the game : 



Sophs — 


AB. R. 


H. PO. A. E. 


Ricketts, c. . 


• . . . 


.3 


3 


0 


5 


0 


Jumper, ss. . . 


..6 


1 


1 


1 


4 


2 


Peeples, lb. . 


..4 


1 


1 


16 


0 


1 


Spann, 2b. . . 


..5 


0 


1 


4 


2 


1 


Davies, cf. . . 


..5 


0 


0 


0 


0 


1 


Lewis, 3b. . . 


..5 


1 


0 


0 


6 


0 


Galloway, rf. 


,.5 


0 


0 


1 


0 


0 


Haley, If. ... 


..4 


1 


2 


2 


0 


0 


Buck, p 


..5 


0 


1 


1 


4 


1 


Freshmen — 


AB. R. 


H. PO. 


A. 


E. 


Tnoms, ss. . . 


..4 


1 


2 


3 


5 


2 


Converse, cf. 


. .4 


2 


2 


0 


0 


0 


Collins. 3b. . . 


.5 


0 


0 


3 


1 


1 


Morse, 2b. . . 


..3 


1 


2 


1 


2 


1 


Carlisle, cf. . 


..1 


0 


0 


1 


0 


2 


Ryals. rf. ... 


..5 


0 


0 


0 


0 


i 


Therrell, p. . . 


. .5 


0 


1 


1 


4 


0 


Huntley, If. . 


. .5 


0 


0 


1 


2 


2 


Holmes, c. . . 


. .5 


1 


2 


5 


0 


0 


Cavett, lb. . . 


. .2 


1 


0 


10 


2 


i 



Summary: 

Two-base Hits — Buck, Holmes. 

Sacrafiee Hit — Cavett, Thoms. 

Double Play — Thoms to Cavett 
to Collins. 

Struck Out — By Buck 7, by 
Therrell 5. 

Base on Balls — Off Buck 1. 

Hit by Pitcher — Ricketts, Con- 
verse. 

Umpire — D. Peeples. 

Time — 1.40. 

We regret that we are unable 
to give an account of the last 
Prep-Freshman game, but the of- 
ficial score has been misplaced 
and will have to be omitted here. 



Belhaven Juniors Entertain. 

Tuesday night will ever be a 
memorable one for those Millsaps 
boys who had the pleasure of at- 
tending the Junior reception at 
Belhaven College. It has always 
been understood that Millsaps 
and Belhaven stand 3ide by side, 
and there exists between the two 



institutions the most affectionate 
and tender relations. (Perhaps 
this expression would apply bet- 
ter to individuals from each col- 
lege than to the colleges as a 
whole). At any rate, Tuesday 
night was an ideal time to renew 
acquaintances and vows of eter- 
nal friendship, and some say that 
Ed Brewer and I. C. Enochs even 
went further. 

The guests were received by 
Misses Heidelberg, Noland, Add- 
kison and Mrs. Preston, and ush- 
ered into the Senior parlor, where 
they were introduced to the fair- 
est bunch of Seniors Belhaven 
boasts in several years. Then 
the guests were piloted to the li- 
brary where they met the “Jolly 
Juniors,” the hosts of the even- 
ing. 

The boys enjoyed chatting with 
the girls for two hours, and then 
delightful refreshments were 
served. 

After bidding a tearful goodby 
to the hosts, and after Charlie 
Hand and Dick Whitaker had 
taken an affectionate farewell of 
the waiter at the door, the guests 
departed — every one regretting 
that time had flown so rapidly 
and that the Belhaven Juniors 
entertained only once a year. We 
understand that John Gass is ex- 
ceedingly anxious to return but 
it doesn’t happen to be a Junior 
upon whom he has centered his 
affections but Mrs. Pond is the 
fortunate one. 

It is also intimated that the new 
hat Chas. Galloway is sporting 
was formerly seen on one of Mr. 
Joe Shurlds’ waiters. 



Hair was made to crimp and curl 
Cheeks were made to blush 
Eyes were made to shine like stars 
And lips were made — 0 hush. 

— Selected. 



Dr. Rowland Addresses the Jun- 
ior History Class. 

On last Friday morning Dr. 
Dunbar Rowland, the keeper of 
archives and history, gave a very 
instructive and helpful talk to the 
Junior history class. The class 
assembled at his office m the State 
capitol and for two hours lis- 
tened to a talk on the Louisiana 
purchase. We understand that 
Dr. Rowland has agreed to give 
u_ another address before the end 
of school. 



Y. M. C. A. 

We were glad to have Prof. 
Rickette talk to us Sunday night. 
It is indeed a rare treat to have 
him talk to us. Every one knows 
him to be a man that lives close 
to God. No one, after being with 
him for any length of time, will 
say that he has not “been with 
Jesus.” With that gentle, earn- 
est tone of voice, with words that 
come from an experienced heart 
and with that indefinable quality 
of personal magnetism, lie makes 
an abiding . impression for good 
on his hearers. He talked mainly 
for the instruction and encourage- 
ment of those who have recently 
taken up the Christian life. He 
quoted to them in the beginning, 
as a guide for them to follow, this 
passage of scripture: “Covet 

earnestly the best gifts, yet show 
I unto you a more excellent 
way.” He explained that it was 
all right to covet the great gifts 
of preaching and teaching and 
the like, but that the best way 
was to live the religious life, and 
to whatever work God calls us, to 
put our whole heart into it. It is 
possible to guide a horse even 
when he is running away, but 
you cannot guide him when he 
is standing still. So he exhorted 
us to keep moving and doing 
something. That as long as we 
were going and showed a wil- 
lingness to do, we would be guid- 
ed, but if we refuse to go as far 
as we know, we may not hope to 
be guided into the greater fields 
of service. 

He impressed usalso with the 
importance of Christian love as 
the one essential attribute of a 
Christian life. “No heart is pure 
that is not passionate.” Chris- 
tian love permeates the whole 
body and shines forth so that the 
very presence of such a person 
gives peace and comfort. Just as 
one feels himself getting better 
as soon as the doctor comes into 
the room. The very countenance 
has healing in it. 

What are the new committees 
doing? It is time to work. The 
sun is up. The fields are white. 
The harvest waiting. 



A blooming blasted buglet 
Climbed up a water spout 
The pain came down in torrents 
And drove the buglet out 
The sun came out again 
And dried up all the rain 



And the blooming blasted son of 
a gun 

Climbed up the spout again 



LOCALS. 

Remember the Field Day. 

Yes, they crossed over the 
river. 

Mr. J. L. Haley spent Easter 
at home. 

Mr. “Bish” Terrell was sick 
Tuesday. 

Mr. L. Barrett Jones spent 
Easter at home. 

“Cut” Nolan, an old shack boy, 
was in town Monday. 

Mr. Bob Ruff was ill Friday and 
Saturday of last week. 

We acknowledge an invitation 
to the Philomathean Society's 
anniversary. 

Mr. R. C. Pugh, who has been 
at home for two weeks, has re- 
turned to school. 

Bro. L. L. Roberts, of Flora, a 
former Millsaps student, was on 
the campus last week. 

As a sportsman Joe Carson says 
he would rather fish for crawfish 
than anything else. 

Miss Rose Austin was initiated 
Saturday night by the Kappa Mu 
Sorority. 

Dr. Sullivan’s house is being 
painted this week which adds 
much to the looks of the campus. 

The Whitworth girls had a hol- 
iday from Thursday until Monday 
of last week. Fortunate girls. 

Mr. R. D. Hinds, a prominent 
planter of the delta was on th« 
campus last week to see his 
friends. 

A sad state of affairs when a 
man can’t get around at night 
on the campus without hurting 
himself. 

Mr. F. S. Williams left Monday 
afternoon for New Orleans to 
attend the Pi Kappa Alpha con- 
vention. 




1R. C. ipcppcr 

$aber&a0bet 



A lot has been purchased out 
at Asylum Heights for the pur- 
pose of the erection of another 
Methodist church. We know this 
is a source of great pleasure to 
the people living out there. 



fatter 



Mr. Shady Blount, a prominent 
member of the Sophomore class, 
was strolling about the campus 
Tuesday night, and it was 30 
dark “(f) ” he fell and hurt him- 
self. 



523 EAST CAPITOL STREET 

Pull Line Suit Cases and Bags 
Fine Tailoring is Our Specialty 



is the latest addition to this f am oub family of picture and fun 



makers, making a splendid picture, easy to operate and cheap to 



Jackson, Miss. 



run. Let us show you. 



Mr. Percy A. Ricketts was in- 
itiated into the ranks of the Kap- 
pa Sigma Fraternity Saturday 
night. 



Jackson, Miss. 

Millsaps College offers courses leading 
to two degrees: B. A. & B. S. 

For Catalogue, address 

W. B. MURRAH, Pres. 



One of the former Co-eds of 
Millsaps College says she has re- 
cently discovered that she is a 
“hypnotizer.” 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 
College Photographer, 

Jackson, 

Miss. 

Capitol St., near Bridge. 



Quite a number of the boys 
went to the Belhaven Junior-Sen- 
ior reception and all report a 
most enjoyable eventhg. 



A scholarship to the Harris 
Business University will be given 
to the person finding where the 
Collegian is “at.” Detective Pin- 
son is barred from the contest for 
personal reasons. 



RAZORS 



JDon’t Fail To See Him 
Before Having Your 
Receptions. 

Phone 201. 502 E. Capitol St. 



for a College Boy is the 



HOWARD AND FOSTER 



All Work Guaranteed 



J. S. Duke 



As an organ of justice we pro- 
hibit the dormitory boys from 
swiping any more of the luna- 
tics’ strawberries ou\ at the asy- 
lum. 



Guaranteed to be as good as any 
other Shoe costing $5.00 or less. 

f 

We are always glad to accommo- 
date Millsaps College boys when- 
ever we can. 



HEDERMAN 

BROTHERS 



Earnest Williamson, of Collins, 
a former student of Millsaps, wa3 
on the campus this week. 



Come to see us. 



Mr. Luther Neill left Monday 
for New Orleans as a delegate to 
the National Pi Kappa Alpha 
Convention. 



PRINTERS 



TATOM SHOE CO 



Don't walk by our beautiful 
display of wall papers without 
inspection. 

HALL-MILLER 
Paint and Glass Co. 

Tr ” v a sui nts f° r All Purposes, 
the Stet. Phone 865. 

sarian, 3< 

speech whn^ aoiled 
medal. 



PUBLISHERS 



G. W. SISTRUNK 



Handles all Kinds of 



BOOK 

BINDERS 



JACKSON MERCANTILE 



COMPANY 



Goods always fresh and prices 



for Fancy Groceries and all kinds 
of Feed Stnffs. Same quality at 
3j ~“ ror J ees.. Prompt deliverty is 



reasonable 



Nice line of Stationery on hand 



f-.,, , 1 Remember the Filed - 

TATOM SHOE CO 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



QUAE PLANT, EX HOC COGNOSCES. 



VOLUME ONE JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, APRIL 23, 1909 NUMBER SIXTEEN 



ATHLETICS. 



Standing of the Teams Wednesday 
Morning. 





W. 


L. 


Pet. 


Sophs 


5 


1 


.833 


Freshmen . . . 


4 


3 


.571 


Juniors 


4 


4 


.500 


Preps 


1 


6 


.142 



Sophs 10, Preps 6. 

The Prep team again met defeat 
Wednesday afternoon at the 
hands of the heavy hitting Sophs. 
The Sophs went to bat first in- 
ning and Buck started the fire 
works with a two-base drive to 
left, nor did they hold up until 
ten scores had been accumulated. 
Ricketts was in the gun pit for 
the Sophs for six innings and then 
was replaced by Captain Buck. 

The game was another demon- 
stration of the fact that no pitch- 
er can win without some kind of 
support. Rankin had none what- 
ever. on the other hand there was 
a few individuals on the Prep 
team who tried to put up the 
punkiest game in their power- 
Errors and dumb playing were 
plentiful on both sides, but the 
Preps claim a majority. The 
Sophs used their sticks to an ad- 
vantage at all times, and if they 
continue their heavy hitting the 
1909 pennant is already their 
property. 

Ford Converse wielded the in- 
dicator and in a manner which 
would do credit to any umpire. 
He was strict and correct in his 
decisions, and turned a deaf ear 
on the loud squabbling of the 
Sophomores — and by the way, the 
fact that the Sophs make peopU 
despise them is brought about by 
their eternal kicking and grum- 
bling. It is the only thing that 
keeps them from being the most 
admirable team on the campus. 
One of the best ways in the world 
for a team to fall into disfavor is 
to make a habit of disputing every 
decision of his umpship. 

-Tj—'r-r- 

Sophs— AB. R. H. PO. A. E. 

Buck, lb & p. . . 5 1 1 6 0 1 

Jumper, ss 5 2 2 1 1 2 

Peeples, c 5 2.111 1 1 

Spann, 2b 5 1 2 3 3 0 1 

- -■ _ 



Davies, cf • . . . . 5 1 1 0 0 0 

Ricketts, p 3 2 1 2 3 0 

Lewis*. 3b 5 0 2 1 3 0 

Haley, If 4 0 0 2 1 2 

Cooper, rf 0 1 0 0 0 0 

Savage, rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 

Galloway, rf. . . 1 0 0 1 0 0 



Base on Balls — Off Rankin 2, 
off Ricketts 1. 

Double Play — A. R. Peeples to 
Lewis. * 

Umpire — Converse. 

Sophs 7, Preps 3. 



Totals ....40 10 10 27 122 

Preps— AB. R, H. PO. A. E. | 
Johnson, ef. ...5 0 1 0 0 

Jones, ss 3 1 1 1 1 1 

Peeples, c 4 1 0 10 4 1 

Williams, 3b. ..4 0 1 0 0 2 

McCoy, 2b- ....4 112 4 1 

Smith, lb 4 1 1 12 1 0 

Stennis, cf 3 2 2 1 0 0 

Rush, rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 

Falcon, rf 2 0 0 0 0 



The Sophs again defeated the 
Preps Saturday afternoon. Hits 
.j j were about evenly divided but 
the Sophs got theirs at opportune 
times. Buek proved invincible in 
pinches. D. Peeples’ three-base 
hit was a feature. 



Preps 15, Juniors 1. 

We present below an account 
0 ! of a farce that was executed on 



Track Meet 

This Afternoon 2:30 

On New Athletic Field. 

Be sure to come and bring some- 
body with you. 



Rankin, p 4 0 1 1 2 0 our ball diamond Monday after- 

noon. No attempt will be made 

Totals .38 6 8 27 12 6 to describe the affair in detail, for 

R. H. E. ! it is beyond description, but we 

Sophs 331 000 021—10 10 6 present shamefully, a lineup and 

Preps 110 003 100— 6 8 6 box score below. If you have 



Summary. time figure it out: 



Three-base Hit — Lewis. 


Juniors — 


AB 


.R. 


H. 


PO 


.A. 


E. 


Two-base Hits — Jones, Wil- 


Enochs, If. . . 


.3 


0 


0 


i 


2 


0 


liams. Smith, Stennis. Buck, Da- 


Gass, ss 


.3 


0 


0 


0 


1 


0 


vies, Lewis. 


Morse, lb. ... 


.3 


0 


0 


6 


0 


0 


Stolen Bases — Jones 10, Pee- 


Hand, cf. ... 


.3 


0 


0 


0 


0 


1 


pies 2. McCoy, Stennis 3, Rush, 


Campbell, rf. 


.3 


0 


0 


0 


0 


1 


Rankin, Buck, Jumper 3, Ricketts 


Crisler, c. ... 


.2 


1 


0 


6 


0 


2 


2, Cooper. 


Johnson, 3b. . 


.2 


0 


0 


0 


1 


0 


Saerafice Hit — Jones. 


Johnston, 2b. 


.2 


0 


0 


5 


4 


0 


Hit by Pitcher — D. Peeple3, 


Applewhite, p 


..2 


O 


1 


0 


1 


1 


Cooper. 




— 


— 


— 


— 


' 


— 


Innings Pitched — Ricketts 6, 


Totals 


23 


1 


1 


18 


19 


5 


Buck 3. 
















Hits Off Ricketts 6, Buck 2. 


Preps — 


AB 


R, 


H. 


PO 


.A. 


E. 


Struck Out — By Rank^L^by 


Johnson, If. . . 


.4 


2 


0 


1 


0 


3 


Ricketts ^ by JIuck 4. 

/ ' — < 


Jones, ss 


.3 


2 


1 3 


0 


0, 



Williams, 3b 


. ..5 


0 


0 


0 


0 


0 


Peeples, c. 


...4 


3 


2 


7 


1 


0 


McCoy, 2b- 


2 


3 


1 


5 


2 


0 


Stennis, lb. 


...2 


2 


0 


2 


0 


0 


Falcon, rf. . 


. ..4 


1 


1 


0 


0 


0 


Smith, lb. 


...3 


1 


1 


3 


0 


0 


Rush, cf. . . 


...0 


1 


0 


0 


0 


0 


Rankin, p. 


...2 


0 


1 


0 


1 


1 


Totals; . 


. .29 


15 


7 21 4 2 
R. H. E. 


Juniors . . . 


000 010 0— 1 


1 


5 


Preps 


223 404 


x — 


-15 


9 


2 



Sumsary. 

Three-base Hit — Peeples. 
Two-base Hit — Applewhite. 
Struck Out — By Rankin 7, by 
Applewhite 7. 

Hit by Pitcher — McCoy, Sten- 
nis. 

Umpire — Collins. 



Track Officers. 

The officials this afternoon for 
the traek are: W. A. Welch, 

manager; L. T. Noble, director; 
H. T. Moore, starter ; Augustus F. 
Kelly, clerk of the course, and 
Robert Ringer, A. B. Kern and 
J. E. Walmsley, judges; Charlie 
Anderson, trainer; Sam Hart, 
water boy, and Dr. Ackland lead- 
er of cheering. 

This is a very competent set of 
judges and it is well that it is so, 
for they are going to have to deal 
with the noisiest, most enthusias- 
tic and largest bunch of specta- 
tors ever seen on such an occasion 
at Millsaps College. The yelling 
and cheering from all parts of the 
campus last night indicated that 
“Clerk of the Course” A. F. Kelly 
was to have “an rather large” 
job on his hands thi3 afternoon, 
but no doubt he will rise and meet 
the emergency. 



Baseball Thieves. 

It is with sincere regret that 
we speak of the disappearance of 
so many baseballs after games. 
The manager always furnishes 
one new ball and an old one for 
a game, and the new one, and 
generally the old one always finds 
its way into the pocket of some 
narrow-minded thieving cuss. 

(Continued on page three). 







PURPLE AND WHITE 



The Purple and White 

Published Weekly by the Junior 
Class of Millsaps College 

ROBT. H. RUFF .... Editor-in-Cbl»f 
E. C. BREWER .... Associate Editor 
A. B. CAMPBELL .... Athletic Editor 
MISS MARGARET SAUM8 . Social Editor 
D. R. WASSON .... Y. M. C. A. Editor 

JOHN GASS Local Editor 

W. E. PHILLIPS Loca Editor 

M. L. NEILL Business Mgr 

A. F. KELLY .... Assistant Bus. Mgr 

All matter for publication should be ad- 
dressed to the Editor-in-Chief. 

All business communications should be ad- 
dressed to the Business M^r., M. L. Neill. 

Entered as seacond class matter January 22, 
1909. at the postoffice at Jackson Miss., 
under act of Congress, March, 3,11879 

Single Copy Per Annum 50 Cents 
Two Copies Per A nnum 75 Cents 

EDITORIAL. 



Remember the Field Day. Let ’s 
make it a red letter day for Mill- 
saps. 



We hope Jackson will be suc- 
cessful in getting the Christian 

| These young men represent every 
college. Three other towns m tne , . ® 



average citizen of Jackson to 
know that the students of Mill- 
saps bring to the city $81*500, as 
actual statistics show that the 
average student spends annua'ly 
$250. The college has an endow- 
ment of $273,000, $250,000 tf 
which is invested, bearing 7 per 
cent- This does not include lu* 
college plant which is valued at 
$175,000, and property rn tne city 
worth $75,000. The yearly run- 
ning expenses are $17,000 the 
most of which is also spent in 
Jackson. 

Besides helping in S financial 
way, it does much to bring the 
city before the people of the 
State. Three hundred and fifty 
young men know Jackson every 
year. They represent nearly as 
many families, who on an average 
have about five members which 
makes 1,750 people interested in 
everything that affects Jackson 



go, occupies the chair of Latin 
and Greek. Prof. H. T. Moore, 
of Missouri, is an M. A. from 
Yale. Prof. Efwin, who is our 
new professor of mathematics, is 
! a Vanderbilt man who hails from 
North Carolina. 

Profs. Ricketts and Huddleston, 



who are native Mississippians. are 



State are bidding for it. 



On Friday, the 16th, the corner 
stone of the new $100,000 chapel 
of the A. & M. College at Stark- 
ville was laid with imposing cere- 
mony. 



Wouldn’t it be great to follow 
in the footsteps of the I. I. & C. 
senior who eloped a few days 
ago? Editorial cares and profes- 
sors could go to Key West then 
with onr compliments. 



phase of life and as the college 
man is recognized to be above 
the average in morals and intel- 
jlect. they make a desirable addi- 
tion. These selfsame student? 
will he leaders in the various pro- 
fessions in the State in 3 few 
years and they will always hav* n 
tender spot in their heart-3 for 
the welfare of Jackson. 



men of mnch experience and 
standd high in their professions. 
Prof. Noble also hails from North 
Carolina, being a graduate of the 
University of North Carolina and 
coming to ns from the Chicago 
University where he was doing 
special work. 

Colleges do much toward giv- 



ing a city the reputation as a 
center of learning. It is Boston’s 
colleges and universities that 
make her the center of culture 
and learning of America. Col- 
leges always attract the best and 
most intellectual class of citizens 
and thereby adds tone and refine- 
ment- 



Lamar Anniversary. 

Tonight will be the sixteenth 
anniversary of the Lamar Litera- 
ry Society. The speakers of the 
occasion are all orators of great 
renown. As orator of the even- 
ing the society selected J. H. 
Brooks, will speak on “The Spir- 
it of the Age.” 

The anniversarian, T. L. Bailey, 
will have for his subject Univer- 
sal Democracy. • 

This is the speech that he will 
deliver at the oratorical contest 
in May. Judge R. V. Fletcher, 
the outside speaker, will well ful- 
fill his part of the program. 

Boys, be sure to come out and 



ask all of your town friends to 
come. Bring your girls with you 
and let them hear three good 
speeches. 



Lyceum Lecture. 

Tne lecture last Friday night 
by Dr. Herbert was considered 
one o fthe best that has ever been 
Among other things it brings I delivered from the Millsaps ros- 



Sixty-six students were recent- 
ly dismissed from the Castle 
Heights School for the remainder weekly newspaper with a number 



Tne average student I'eoenet 
four pieces of mail per week, 
making 50,400 pieces during a 
college year. We send out e t -ral- 
ly as much. Besides the regular 
correspondence, we have four 
college publications including a 



prominent speakers, lecturers and 
divines to the city. In the past 
few years we have had with us 
Dean Tillett, Bishops Wilson, Key, 



tram. His subject. “A Man 
Among Men,” was one exactly 
suited to college students, it was 
I one that blended both the serious 



Hendrix, Carter and Hoss, Dr. 
Lee from Atlanta, Dr. Palmore, 
Le Flomme from India ana otner 
prominent men. Also the Lyceum 



and humorous. 

The chapel wa3 filled to its ut- 
most capacity. This speaks well 
for the lecture as we know that 



course under the auspices of the there were other attractions in 



of the session because they went 
to a eireus. Pretty heavy price 
to pay to see the elephant. 



Brown. Princeton and Pennsyl- 
vania will probably send baseball 
teams to the Alaska-Yukon Ex- 
position this summer. Chicago, 
Illinois and Michigan have al- 
ready accepted invitations to send 
teams. 



of out-of-town subscribers. This 



The Value of a College to a City. 



We wish to commend the Jack- 
son papers and the efficient Board 
of Trade for the efforts they are 
making to secure the location of 
the Christian college which is to 
he located in our State. Very 
few people realize the value of a 
college to a city. 

Take onr own college, for in- 
stance. It would surprise the 



number does not include the li- 
brary and college mail nor that 
of the faculty. 

The advantage of a cultured 
and refined faculty is worth 
much. Our president is a man of 
much abilityy and learning, being 
a Doctor of Divinity, and Doctor 
of Laws; our vice president from 
Louisiana is a Ph. D. from Van- 
derbilt also a Chicago man who 
came to us from the Vanderbilt 
faculty. Onr secretary, who is a 
man of experience and ability, is 
also a Ph. D., who comes to us 
from Virginia- Dr. Kern, our 
librarian, also comes from Vir- 
ginia and having done his doc- 
tors work at Hopkins and has 
traveled extensively abroad. 
Prof. Swartz, a University of Vir- 
ginia man, having done special 
w/*rk at the University of Chica- 



eollege always brings splendid at- 
tractions to the city. We also 



town on the same night. We 
were very glad to have the Bel- 



have the only Carnegie library haven students out with us once 



in the State which offers excep- 
tionally good library facilities. 



Field Day Program. 



9 :30 a. m. — Open air gymna- 
sium contest on bar, horse, rings 
and mat. 

11:00 a. m. — Patriotic exercises 
in chapel. 

2:30 p. m. Field Sports: 



1 . 

2 - 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6 . 

7. 

8. 
9. 

10 . 

11 . 

12. 

13. 

14. 

15 - 

16- 



Mile. 

Half mile. 

Quarter. 

2.20 yard dash. 
Running broad jump. 
Running high jump. 
Standing broad jump. 
Standing high jump. 
Hurdle race. 

Shot put- 
3-leg race. 

Pick-a-back race. 

Sack race. 

Throwing baseball. 
Potato race. 

Class relav race. 



again. We hope that they will 
continue to come out to our at- 
tractions. 

This lecture ended the Lyceum 
Course for this year. This year’s 
course was without doubt the 
most successful that has been of- 
fered to the Millsaps students. 



17 t'rJHu.n of war. 



Quite a little tilt occurred in 
the Arkansas legislature last week 
when a bill was introduced to 
move the University from Fayette 
ville to Little Rock. It seems 
probable now that Little Rock 
will succeed in fettinf it. 



Come and bring your conflict to 
the sixteenth anniversary of the 
Lamar Literary Society to be cel- 
ebrated on the evening of the 23d 
of April, 1909. 



At the last baseball game be- 
tween the Juniors and Sophs, the 
Sophs “ragged” the umpire con- 
tinually about Morse stealing sec- 
ond base. 



/ ; ; 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 




ATHLETICS. 

(Continued from page one). 



Now we do not want to hurt any- 
body’s feelings or bring a scrap 
on our hands, but we intend to 
stand by what was said in the 
first issue of the Purple and 
White. We still intend to say 
what we think freely and without 
reserve. A man who woidd steal 
a base hall because he thmgnt 
he was not getting his mon-v's 
worth out of the athletic associa- 
tion, deserves to be in the peni- 
tentiary, and he will certainly 
land there if he continues in his 
course. The stealing is done so 
openly that we blush with the 
thought of the shame and dis- 
grace of it all. Tom Stennis has 
worked hard trying to keep the 
association supplied with balls, 
without incurring unnecessary ex- 
pense. But Stennis, nor any other 
man, can do this as long as he is 
dealing with so many thieves, 
when they are supposed to be 
gentlemen. At one game last week 
when several members or the fac- 
ulty, and quite a number of vis- 
itors were present, the new hall 
was stolen in the first inning, and 
only one ball could be used the 
rest of the game. It was known, 
too, that some boy had stolen the 
ball, and had it on his person, 
while the game dragged slowly 
on. 

We are not firing at any indi- 
vidual in these remarks, but if 
anyone sees fit to take exceptions 
they may report to the athletic 
editor of this paper, and in our 
next issue we can give you the 
names of some thieves, for you 
knc>w a dog never Darks until 
hehhc hit. We know that we are 
ri this matter and we in- 

til! 1 ^ figght to a finish! — so 
there. 



Batting Averages. 



AB. 

Freshmen .... 232 
Sophomores . . . 219 

Juniors 237 

Preps 222 

AB. 

Converse 22 

Thoms 23 

Th err ell 24 

D. Peeples 27 

Spann 26 

Holmes ? .27 

Ricketts .... ^ '15 

McCoy ...; tar 11 
-nior baseba 



H. 

50 

43 

43 

40 



Pet. 

.215 

.193 

.189 

.180 



H. 

8 

8 

8 

9 

8 

7 

4 

6 



BA. 

.363 

.344 

.333 

■333 

.307 

.291 

.267 

.250 



Applewhite . 


...20 


5 


.250 


J. W. Morse. 


...29 


7 


•241 


W. E. Morse 


...25 


6 


.240 


T. Stennis . . . 


...25 


6 


.240 


Haley 


...21 


5 


.238 


Rankin 


...21 


6 


.238 


Gass 


...31 


7 


.225 


Campbell . . . 


...27 


6 


.222 


Prep Stennis 


...23 


5 


.217 


Collins 


...29 


6 


.206 


Davies 


...21 


4 


.190 


Galloway . . . 


...22 


4 


.181 


Jumper .... 


.. .28 


5 


.178 


Williams . . . 


...28 


5 


.178 


Brooks 


. ..23 


4 


•173 


Smith 


...24 


4 


.167 


Savage 


... 6 


1 


.167 


Crisler 


.. . 6 


1 


.167 


A. Peeples . . 


...25 


4 


.160 


Buck 


.. .25 


4 


.160 


J. G. Johnson 


...19 


3 


.157 


Rvals 


...28 


4 


.143 


T. W. Lewis. 


...21 


3 


.142 


Hand 


...25 


3 


.120 


Jones 


.. .26 


3 


.120 


W. B. Lewis. 


... 9 


1 


.111 


Falcon 


... 9 


1 


•111 


Kirkland . . . 


...20 


2 


.100 


Huntley .... 


...19 


2 


.053 


Rush 


...16 


1 


.051 


Whitson .... 


...24 


1 


.041 


Johnson .... 


...25 


1 


.040 


Brabston . . . 


... 9 


0 


.000 


Ramsey .... 


... 2 


0 


.000 


Enochs .... 


... 5 


0 


.000 


Brvan 


... 3 


0 


.000 


Y. M. C 


. A 


• 


Owing to counter 


attractions 


the attendance has not been very 


good at the meetings 


this week. 


We were sorry not to have 


more 


out, for both services 


were 


good- 


Friday night Mr. Owen gave us a 


good talk 


on •' 


Overcoming 


Faith.” He 


urged 


us to 


have 


faith like the 


faith 


of Abraham 


and of Peter. 


That as Peter did 


not stop to argue with the 


angel, 


and tell him 


that he could not 


pass the guards, and should he 


pass the guards he could not open 


the gate, but got up and followed 


him, trusting him in 


the fullest, 


so we ought to follow the 


com- 


mands of God and 


expect his 


promises and 


not stop to 


argue 


as to their possibility. It did 


our hearts good to see this 


“new 


man” making 


this noble 


effort 



even Christ escaped being tempt- 
ed of the Devil. How Satan plied 
his art most subtlely on Jesus, 
knowing that if he could only get 
Christ, the only plan for our re- 
demption, to fall down and wor- 
ship him, his battle would be 
won. But that Christ overcame 
Satan and saved the world. He 
said that just as the wind 
strengthens the oak and makes it 
take deeper hold upon the earth, 
just so does temptation strength- 
en us, if we overcome t«rem. This 
is voiced in the hymn: 

“Yield not to temptation 
For yielding is sin 
Each victory will fle-ip 
You some other to win. 



for his Master. 

We were very glad to have 
Prof. Erwin speak for us Sunday 
night. His subject, “Tempta- 
tion,” was very applicable to us, 
for as he said, “all have tempta- 
tions.” He told us how that not 

-ttA 



-A 



b^ 



The Word says that when 
Christ had gained the victory the 
Devil left him and angels came 
and ministered unto him. We 
often expect this to happen in our 
case. We win a victory. We feel 
good and feel that the Devil is 
gone and will never come back. 
But just set this down as a fact 
that just after you have won a 
victory. Satan is doing some of 
his most subtle work- For exam- 
ple, you may have g’ven over to 
do personal work, you have pray- 
ed and worked hard and souls 
have been saved. You feel that 
you have won a complete victory 
and that Satan will never have 
power over you again. But just 
about this time the old fellow 
comes along and says to you, 
“Just look what a work you 
have done. You are the best soul- 
winner here. What is the use of 
you spending so much time in 
prayer? You can jnst talk any- 
body into it.” If you don’t mind 
you will be following his sugges- 
tions. You do not recognize the 
fiend. You leave God out of it 
and depend on your slick tongue 
to do the work. Then the Devil 
has you going his way. We may 
never hope to get to the point of 
exemption from temptation in 
this life. As Prof. 'Erwin said, 
“This life is a great conflict and 
the greater the conflict the great- 
er the life.” Let us be men and 
not cowards in this great con- 
flict of life. We often hesitat.e, 
falter in the face of duty, and 
say, “Well, if we try we don’t 
succeed. We can’t do that.” 
Men, we are cowards if we say it. 
We must try. “Nothing attempt- 
ed. nothing done- - ” 

On the other hand there is a 



to do most anything, that if they 
were just president or had some 
high office they would be willing 
to work. But they refuse to do 
the small things. Men, we must 
begin with the small things. Do 
whatever comes to hand, and by 
so doing we will have strength in 
overcoming temptation. Unless 
we are taithful in small matters 
wemay not hope to gain greater 
positions. This is so in any world, 
intellectual, physical or any you 
please. If we hope to rise we 
must overcome the conflict. 



LOCALS. 

Mr. A. F. Moore will lead Y. 
M. C. A. Sunday night. 

There will be no Y. M. C- A. 
tonight. 

Mr. Tom Stennis was in Me- 
ridian last week. 

Remember field day, April 23, 
1909. 

i 

Mr. A. Boyd Campbell spent 
Saturday and Sunday in Norfield. 

Mr. R. B. Alexander is at home 
at present. 

Don’t say Francis to Albert 
Heidelberg. 

- 

Ed Brewer says he is so sorry 
that school will be out in about 
five or six weeks. He would like 
to see Belhaven continue through 
the summer. 



They say that the Junior chem- 
istry class is overjoyed at the fact 
that Dr. Sullivan has secured 
more gas for the labratory- Ton 
Stennis pronounces this a false 
alarm. 



A 



class who think themselves able 

oi- 



Mr. Frank S. Williams has re- 
turned from New Orleans. 



Mr. T. L. Baley has accepted a 
position as a member of the Cam- 
den High School faculty. 

Mr. “Crit” Nolan, an old Mill- 
saps boy, was on the campus last 
week. 



And was ever jolly as he went. 
“Tige” Applewhite. 

The A. & M. tennis team passed 
through Jackson last week en 
route to Clinton. 



Dr. Murrah left for Richmond, 
Va., last week where he is to at- 
tend a meetine of the Board of 
Education of the M- E. Church, 
South. Dr. Murrah is to preside 
over the assembly one day whi 1 ' 
there. 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



1R. <L [pepper 

l^abertjasGet 



anti 

fatter 



523 HAST CAPITOL STREET 

Full Line Suit Cases and Bags 

Fine Tailoring is Our Specialty 

Phone 1002 Jackson, Miss. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Jackson, Miss. 

Millsaps College offers courses leading 
to two degrees: B. A. & B. S. 

For Catalogue, address 

W. B. MURRAH, Pres. 



GOTO 



The last member of the Lyceum 
lecturers was the best of the 
season. 

Dr. A. A. Kern is to deliver a 
lecture at Clinton Saturday. 

The State University continues 
to uphold her reputation in the 
baseball line. We have recently 
noticed that the team won the se- 
ries with S. P. U. 

One of the Freshmen nas enter- 
ed the insanity plea for being so 
ignorant. 

Mr. C. R- Rew went home last 
week. 

Mr. M. L. Neill has returned 
from New Orleans. 

Mr. Holmes, of the Freshman 
class, went home last week. 

Mr. R. B. Sharborough, of the 
Senior class, is sick this week. 



r 

(11 


[i 


III 

III 


i \ 


1 


18 


FOR YOUR 


Refreshments 



EAT AT HIS 

RESTAURANT. 

Don’t Fail To 8ee Him 
Before Having Your 
Receptions. 

Phone 201. 502 E. Capitol St. 




Don’t walk by our beautiful 
display of wall papers without 
inspection. 



HALL-MILLER 
Paint and Glass Co. 

Wholesale Paints for All Purposes. 
Ill State Street. Phone 865. 

When clothes are soiled 
Have them boiled 
Get Eizzy 
Ring Izzy 

Jackson Steam Laundry. 

PHONE 730 



Come out to the anniversary 
and hear Judge Fletcher tonight. 

We are fortunate in having the 
Rev. Walter G. Harbin to deliver 
a lecture on next Friday night. 

Lee Robinson, of Centreville, 
an old Millsaps boy, was a dele- 
gate to the Sunday School con- 
vention- 



RAZORS 

Honed IBe 

All Work Guaranteed 

J. S. Duke 

Peg Bufkin, the old reliable, 
will do your typewriting quicker 
and cheaper than anyone else. 
Work guaranteed. See him at the 
Dormitory. 

Go to 

JACKSON MERCANTILE 
COMPANY. 

for Fancy Groceries and all kinds 
of Feed Stuffs. Same quality at 
lower prices. . Prompt deliverty is 
our motto. 

G. W. SISTRUNK 
Handles all Kinds of 

Good things to eat. 

Goods always fresh and prices 
reasonable . 

Nice line of Stationery on hand 

Give him a trial 

/v 



Student’s Fountain 
Pen $1.00 

will save you much trouble. 

Eyrich & Co. 



Kappa Sigma Reception. 

One of the greatest social suc- 
cesses of the college year was the 
annual spring reception given by 
t'ne Kappa Sigmas on Friday 
evening, April 16. The night was 
ideal for such an occasion and 
the hospitable halls of the local 
chapter were thrown open to wel- 
come the host of friends invited. 
This was the annual event, hence 
the number of guests was even 
larger than usual. Among this 
number were several members of 
the faculty and their wives, a fair 
delegation from Belhaven and 
the entire senior class besides the 
boys of Alpha Upsilon and a host 
of other friends. 

The spacious halls were most 
attractive in their simple decora- 
tions. Numberless pennants of 
other colleges and fraternities 
adorned the walls while bowers 
of ferns and roses here and 
there lent their charm to the 
scene. 



pelled to disband. The Kappa 
Sigma boys are adepts at enter- 
taining. 




The Best Shoe 

for a College Boy is the 

HOWARD AND FOSTER 
$3 50 and $4 00 

Guaranteed to be as good as any 
other Shoe costing $5.00 or less. 
We are always glad to accommo- 
date Millsaps College boys when- 
ever we can. 



A delightful salad course was | 
served, followed by a dainty ice 
and cakes in the usual Kappa 
Sigma design. The punch howl 
was of course a popular resort 
during the entire evening. 

“Sweeter the hours sooner to 
go” is certainly a true saying. 
Before any one realized it the 
time for “good nights” had come 
and the happy party was eom- 



Come to see us. 

TATOM SHOE CO. 

■ 

THE DANIEL STUDi 
College Photographer. 

Jackson, 

Miss. 

Capitol St., near Bridge. 



Do You Know 

that the KirkTand Boys have the 
best and cheapest Tine of Pennants 

on earth. See them. ase ° 

. 



: 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



QUAE FIANT, EX HOC COGNOSCES. 



VOLUME ONE JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. APRIL 30, 1909 NUMBER SEVENTEEN 



ATHLETICS. 

A Step in the Eight Direction. 

A letter J:o our editor from one 
of the most prominent ministers 
in the North Mississippi Confer- 
ence says: 

“The Winona District Confer- 
ence at Schlater on the 23rd inst. 
passed resolutions requesting the 
North Mississippi Conference at 
its next session to give its con- 
sent to leave all questions of ath- 
letics to the trustees and faculty 
of Millsaps College.” We think 
the management of athletics 
should be left to the trustees and 
Dr. Murrah and other members 
of the faculty because they are 
qualified to put proper restraints 
around the boys, and naturally 
know the needs ana conidtions 
better than any one else.” 

In closing our friend said: 
“You must handle the matter 
smoothly, and you stand a good 
chance to win. Don’t let hard 
things be said, but have all the 
boys •write to their fathers, and 
fathers to their respective minis- 
ters about the matter. This will 
do a great deal of &ood.” 

The Purple and White has 
thought all the time that Con- 
ference should let the board of 
trustees take charge or athletics 
but we have hesitated to say so, 
and it is with great gratification 
that we see a step in this direction 
by a board of prominent minis- 
ters. 

We sincerely hope that the mat- 
ter will be considered seriously 
by other conferences. 



Athletic Editor Resigns. 

On account of over work A. B. 
Campbell, athletic editor of the 
Purple and White, is compelled 
to resign- We are very sorry 
that Mr. Campbell has to resign 
for he has been one of the best 
and most efficient editors on the 
staff. He has always brought up 
his part well and his athletic 
dope has been as good as any ath- 
letic editor could write. 

In Mr. Campbell’s place Mr. 
J. M. Morse, the star first base- 
man of the Junior baseball team. 



has been chosen. Mr. Morse is 
a very enthusiastic athlete and 
bids fair to make an excellent 
athletic editor. 



From an Outsider. 

Mr. Ringer in talking to a re- 
porter for this paper said: “It 

has been my pleasure to witness 
a great many field day contests, 
but this has been the most inter- 
esting and best conducted con- 
test I have ever witnessed. You 
have some of the best material 
here I have ever seen. Some 
of youro athletes will break 
records some day if they con- 
tinue their training. Of course 
you have been handicapped 
today by the heavy track but 
next year you should be able to 
make time that will startle your 
most ardent supporters.” 

Another gentleman was heard 
to remark : ‘ ‘ This day has been 

a revelation to me in athletics- I 
have viewed it with an eye which 
is blind in conference. Hereafter 
I intend to stand by you in your 
struggle for intercollegiate ath- 
letics. _ 

Field Day. 

Field Day is over. The great- 
est day in the history of our col- 
lege is now a thing of the past. 
We will remember it as long as 
the memory of Millsaps College 
lingers with us. We will always 
think of the 23rd of April as an 
eventful one at an opportune 
time. 

It is due to Prof. Noble that we 
owe most for making Field Day 
the great success that it was. He 
put into the work his time, labor 
and money, and the student body 
feels greatly indebted to him. 

Manager Welch is also to be 
congratulated on the way he 
handled his part of the work on 
this occasion. It was due to his 
efforts that so many handsome 
prizes were awarded, and it was 
partly due to the prizes that so 
many contestants entered and 
worked so hard.' 

Tne students feel indebted to 
their friends in town and at Bel- 
haven who encouraged them by 



their presence and by the interest 
manifested in the proceedings. 
We want it distinctly understood 
that the good people of Jackson 
are always welcome at any time 
they choose to visit us. 

We are also very grateful to 
the Daily News and the Clarion- 
Ledger for the write ups they 
gave us, both before and after 
Field Day. 

And above all we wish to thank 
the faculty of our college for 
making this day possible for us. 
Without it there would have been 
a vacancy in our collegiate year 
that could have been filled by 
nothing else. 

Following is the list of winners 
of Field Day events- It will be 
seen that Mr. Buck . is college 
champion by his winning the hur- 
dle raee, the 220 yard dash, the 
standing broad jump, second on 
100 yard dash, and third on the 
ball throwing contest. By win- 
ning these he Avas credited wt'h 
more points than any other con- 
testant. 

Gymnasium Contest — Won by 
Kirkland. 

Throwing Baseball — Morse. 
Kirkland second. Buck third. 

Running Broad Jump — Davies, 
19 feet ; Carson second. Williams 
third. 

Putting Shot — Wasson, 35 feet 
1 inch ; Falcon second, Kirkland 
third. 

Quarter Mile 'Race — Kirkland 
first, Davies second. 

Running High Jump — Carson 
57 inches; Huntley second, Ther- 
rell third. 

Hurdle Raee — Buck. 15 1-2 sec- 
onds: Morse and Haley, 161-2. 

Standing Broad Jump — Buck, 
10 feet 3 inches: Carson second, 
Williams third. 

Egg Race — Kirkpatrick. 
Half-mile Race — Converse first, 
Thoms second. Brooks third. 

Standing High Jump — Davies, 
51 inches; Kirkland, second j 
Huntley, third. 

220-Yard Dash— Buck, first; 
Rickets, second; Morse, third. 

Tug of War — Preps won; eight 
preps held one end of a rope and 
eight men kicked from all other 



classes held the other, but the 
preps Avon both struggles. 

100-Yard Dash — Kyals, first; 
Buck’ second; Carson, third. 

One-Mile Race — Kirkland, first ; 
Campbell, second. (In this race, 
Avhich Avas the feature of the day, 
Kirkland Avon over Campbell by 
barely six inches). 

Three-legged Racs - — Bingham 
and Simmons. 

After the events had been pull- 
ed off, each contestant was enti- 
tled to one vote for the prettiest 
girl on the grounds. Miss Gussie 
Glenn Lamar Avas unanimously 
elected, and Avas then presented 
Avith a beautiful boquet of flowers 
bv the all-round champion “Sis” 
Buck. 

The boys then called for a 
speech from Miss Lamar Avho gra- 
ciously responded with a few well 
chosen Avords of thanks, which 
Avere greeted Avith rounds if ap- 
plause. The collegians then 
“capped the climax” by jsrivbier 
fifteen rahs for “Suga ' i” 



Sophs Win Rag 

By taking the game Wednesday 
afternoon the Sophs cinched the 
1909 penniant. There are sev- 
eral games to be played off yet, 
hoAvever. Two games Avere post- 
poned last Aveek which will be 
played in the near future. 

No one will say that the Sophs 
Avon in any way except by real 
hard work, and good ball playing. 
They are good hitters and good 
fielders. They are above all 
fighgters. We congratulate them. 



A Bit of Inconsistency. 

All of us remember the Rev- 
Mr. Galloway, Avho so bitterly op- 
posed intercollegiate athletics on 
the floor of the South Mississippi 
Conference, and who became so 
indignant at an article published 
in the Purple and White, and 
thundered his denuciations at us 
through the columns of the New 
Orleans Christian Advocate. Well, 
this same gentleman has a son 
who is a catcher on the Chamber- 
lain Hunt Academy ball teap’ raa _ 
(Continued on page three). 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



The Purple and White 

Published Weekly by the Junior 
Class of Millsaps College 

HOBT. H. RUFF .... Edltor-in-CtaUf 
E. C. BREWER .... Associate Editor 
A. B. CAMPBELL .... Athletic Editor 
MISS MARGARET SAUMS . Social Editor 
D. R. WASSON .... Y. M. C. A. Editor 

JOHN GASS Local Editor 

W. E. PHILLIPS Loca Editor 

M. L. NEILL Business Mgrr 

A. F. KELLY .... Assistant Bus. Mgrr 

All matter for publication should be ad- 
dressed to the Editor-in-chief. 

All business communications should be ad- 
• dressed to the Business Mgr., M. L. Neill. 

Entered as seacond class matter January 22, 
1909, at the postoffice at Jackson Miss., 
under act of Congress, March, 3, 1879 

Single Copy Per Annum 50 Cents 
Two Copies Per Annum 75 Cents 

EDITORIAL. 



Stay for Commencement. 

In order to remind the boys 
we have put in this article rather 
early and not so early after all, 
for if we stop to think we will 
see that there are only four or 
five more weeks of this session. 
If there are any preparations to 
be made in order to stay for 
commencement a student has am- 
ple time. 

Heretofore it has been the cus 
tom on the part of most of the 
students to rush off for home and 
other places just as soon as their 
final exaimnations are over. Com- 
mencement week is just as much 
a part of the college year as any 
other weelt and far more import- 
ant. Mora good can be derived 
from one commencement week 
then from several weeks of regu- 
lar college work. 

We ought to stay for com- 
mencement not only for the good 
we get out of it but because we 
owe it to the college and to the 
Senior Class. What do you sup- 
pose a person would think of a 
school if he were invited to de- 
liver the annual address and had 
only about 75 or 100 boys out c.’ 
250 or 300 to speak to? Very 
likely he would think that tie 
boys did not care very much foi 
their college. That's just th - way 
things are here. Out of 250 boys 
only about 125. possibly not more 
than 100. remain through com- 
mencement week. I say we owe 
it to the Senior Class, we surely 
do. Only once do boys and gti'is 
have the pleasure of graduating 
from this school- Why not make 
that time as pleasant as possible 
for them? The only way we can 
dn it is to stay here. We -can’t 

>ke them have a good time w>. 



, being at home or somewhere else 
j and they being here. 

Now boys, whether or not we 
have a good commencement this 
year is up to us. Let’s stay here 
and make this commencement the 
best in the history of Millsaps 
College. 

Besides having some excellent 
speeches from representatives of 
the students, there are always 
prominent speakers from a dis- 
tance- 

These few days will be the 
cream of the year’s work, so 
don’t fail to stay and hear it. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Since the work of the Young 
Men’s Christian Association is 
done by the committee system the 
necessity of the committeemen 
entering upon their work with 
the greatest diligence should be 
emphasized. To deal with such 
an important element as the life 
of man and with such mighty 
forces as the truths of the Bible 
and the world of missions, re- 
quires careful study of the work 
and a deep spiritual life. We 
must know our problems if we 
want our efforts to count for the 
most. Otherwise we will be 
found fighting “as one that beat- 
eth the air.” The principal rea- 
son for having committees is to 
give a change for the most im- 
portant departments of the asso- 
ciation to be studied. “To fail is 
not a disgrace, but to continue 
to fail in the same thing, because 
we have not taken time to think 
cut the reason for oar ianure, is 
no less than sinful. 

Formalism is a sin that is 
threatening all Christian organi- 
zations. If we would prevent the 
association from drifting into this 
channel we must know our prob- 
lems and seek divine guidance 
through the searching of the 
Scriptures and prayer. Then our 
movement will be a growing one. 
Too often we hear men say, “I 
have done all that I think is nec- 
essary,” when they have not 
trained their minds to think intel- 
ligently of their, work. We are 
anxious to believe that there is 
nothing to do, when at the same 
time the harvest is white and the 
fields have not been survey. 1 !. 
No man can be induced to play at 
trifles- If a work cannot prove 
itself hard enough and big enough 

^ an- 



and important enough to call 
out the heroic he will not con- 
tinue it. The vision of the im- 
portance of the work must be 
constantly enlarged by the study 
of the difficulties which must be 
surmounted. 

Another evil which hinders the 
work of committees is that they 
try to do all of their work at 
once in order to get it off hand. 
This ought not to be. Like Liv- 
ingston, who said when he de- 
cided to go to Africa. “It is my 
desire to show my attachment to 
the cause of Him who died for 
me by devoting my life to His 
cause,” and later, “from this 
time my efforts were constantly 
devoted toward this object with- 
out any fluctuations.” We, too, 
must show our devotion to our 
work by not attempting to do it 
by fits and starts but by making 
it an every day business. 

Every committee must have a 
regular time to meet and discuss 
the situation and needs in the 
special departments. Systematic 
work cannot exist without co- 
operation. Committeemen must 
settle on the same possible plan 
and after this plan has been 
formulated regular meetings must 
be held in order to make known 
their difficulties and learn how to 
overcome them. For a commit- 
tee to he unwilling to meet regu- 
larly means that they are willing 
to fail in their work. 

Interest is a primary requisite 
for success, and there is no bet- 
ter method for creating and re- 
taining interest than to have reg- 
ular meetings and discuss the 
work in hand. At these meetings 
there should be developed a fel- 
lowship of prayer, a part f bat 
must never he omitted. In a work 
thus begun there will he devel- 
oped a vision of something worth 
doing. Each one should feel that 
every turn has a part in shaping 
the character of those for whom 
this work is planned. 

Again the committee work is 
hindered when the chairman tries 
of the committee work is to train 
to do it by himself. One object 
lower classmen to become leaders. 
When the chairman fails to give 
these men work to 'do he fails to 
develop them and the work of 
the following session is cr.pp'e.d 
because tnen are not prenared to 
grasp the situation. Beside*? this, 
when the work is done -by one 
man it is hot as broad in its scope 



as when it is done by several- If 
the chairman does the work alone 
we have the fruits of his ideas. 
But if the work is done by a set 
of men we have the fruit from a 
combination of ideas. 

Men in all of life’s depart- 
ments have realized that they can 
no longer keep abreast with the 
spirit of the. time without organ- 
izing themselves into a body. 
They have found that better re- 
sults can be accomplished with 
less time, effort and money. So 
it is with committeemen in the 
Y. M. C. A. work. With persist- 
ent organized effort thus they 
will realize as a result from 
“something attempted, something 
done. ’ ’ 



In speaking of Rev. W. G. Har- 
bin’s lecture at the College Tues- 
day night, the Clarion-Ledger 
says: 

Rev. Walter G. Harbin deliver- 
ed an interesting address at Mill- 
saps College last night, before 
the faculty and student body on 
the subject of “The Noontide 
Vision,” the Scripture text being: 
“Whereupon, Oh, King Agrippa, 
I was not disobedient unto the 
Heavenly vision.” Acts 19:26- 

He was ■ appropriately and 
handsomely introduces vy Mr. R. 
H. Ruff, of the Junior Class. 

These words, he said, were 
spoken by a missionary. The 
vision he saw at high noon. The 
upon his life changed all the 
impact of that noontide vision 
springs of action, and reformed 
its course. The impact of his vis- 
ion formed character upon the 
race, changed the springs of its 
thought and remodeled all its 
history. 

The vision constantly before 
the mind of Christ Jesus through- 
out his ministry was the salvation 
of the world. When he met Saul 
of Tarsus in the noontide vision 
on the Damascus road he said: 
“I send thee far hence unto the 
Gentiles.” The vision of Christ 
became the vision of Paul. The 
vision of Paul was to become the 
vision of the Church. 

A noontide vision ! The visions 
of the Old Testament were night 
visions. Jacob’s life centered 
about two great nights. Isaiah 
saw his wonderful vision “the 
night in which King pzziah 
died.” The visions of the New 
TWlsmerit were of the day. Jot a 
saw all -the winders of PMim..s 



t 



PUBPLE AND WHITE 



“while he was in the spirit on the 

Lord’s day” Paul saw his life 

v 

enangmg, world changing vision 
at high noon. 

Paul’s vision was a vision i 
world-conquering missions. The 
missionary vision is the noontide 
vision of the Church. The infant 
Church leaped in response to the 
call of the noontide vision. Caes- 
area became an evangelistic cen- 
tre. Antioch, the vilest hell hole 
in the rolling East, awoke at the 
call of the Nazarene, christene.d 
the Church, broke, eown the last 
barrier in the way of the incom- 
ing of the Gentiles, and thrust 
paul out into his world-wide min 
istry. 

But the Church did not remain 
true to its early vision. Theo- 
logical strife took the place of 
heroic evangelism. The cham- 
pions of the Church went to war 
over prepositions, and died in de- 
fense of a diphthong. “When the 
vision faileth the people cast off 
restraint.” Tne dark ages closed 
in, and night settled thick upon 
a hopeless world. 

The fourteenth century wit- 
nessed a new dawning in history. 
The fall of Byzantime sounded 
the morning gun of civilization. 
A scholarly refugee from the fal- 
len city appeared on the streets 
of Florence, and from early morn- 
ing to late evening spellbound 
crowds listened as he rehearsed 
the classic hero-tales of Greece 
and Rome.. Literature had come 
back to the world. A German 
monk nailed a paper to a cathe- 
dral door, and Germany rose with 
sword in hand and a hymn upon 
her lips. Faith had come back to 
the Church. Knowledge revived- 
Science was recreated. Revolu- 
tions tore with bloody hand at 
grim foundations of immemorial 
wrong, and society was born 
again of fire and steel. Columbus 
found a new world. Galileo dis- 
covered a new universe. Art and 
literature had their Renaissance. 
Religion achieved a reformation. 

We bask in the full moontide 
of that morning. The world is 
awake. It is daylighgt every- 
where. Japan has a new civili- 
zation, China a new hope, Persia 

a constitution. Turkey a revolu- 

• -■ 

tiont and even icy Thibet has 
heard the gospel. 

In the van *rt the world’s on- 
sweeping march of , progress 
strides the missionary. Missions 
are the uooutid* visions .rtf .the 



Church in the noontide age of 
the world. 

Mr. Harbin then discussed va- 
rious practical phases of the mis- 
sionary movement and closed 
with an appeal for volunteers to 
this service. 



ATHLETICS. 

(Continued from page one). 

and who caught two games 
against French Camp Academy 
recently on the Millsaps diamond. 
Now we dare not say much but 
we are thinking a great deal. We 
cannot see how the gentleman ex- 
pected to carry his policies 
through with such an inconsist- 
ency glaring him in the face — and 
the strongest part of it all is that 
the boy played a good game. 
Sorry he can’t play on an inter- 
collegiate team when he comes to 
Millsaps — but perhaps his father 
will send him somewhere where 
he can make the ’varsity and 
play other schools away from his 
own college. 



Jumper, ss. 


. .4 


0 


0 


3 


2 


0 


Reports of committees, election 


Peeples, lb. 


. .0 


1 


0 


2 


0 


0 


of officers and adjournment. 


Till, If 


..1 


1 


0 


1 


0 


0 




Spann, 2b. . 


..4 


1 


0 


1 


3 


0 


Southern University Debate. 


Lewis, 3b. . 


. .0 


1 


0 


1 


1 


1 




Ricketts, p. 


2 


1 


1 


2 


0 


0 


Mullins and Ruff have just re- 


Galloway, If. 














ceived a communication from the 


& lb 


..3 


0 


1 


5 


0 


0 


Southern University stating that 


Davies, cf. . 


. .2 


1 


0 


0 


0 


0 


for unforeseen reasons the debate 


Lewis, rf. . 


. ,i 


1 


0 


0 


0 


0 


will be held at Greensboro and 


Haley, rf. „ 


. i 


1 


1 


0 


0 


0 


not at Birmingham as was ex- 


Juniors .... 


000 


000 


0—0 


0 


4 


peeted- 


Sophomores 


111 


006 


X— 


-9 


4 


1 


Our representatives have pre- 


Two-base Hit — Buck. 








pared good speeches and we are 


Struck Out- 


—By Ricketts 


7, 


by 


expecting SpceesA Thrtir oppo- 



Sophs Again Victorious. 



“Puss” Ricketts made himself 
famous Wednesday afternoon by 
pitching a no-hit, no-run game 
against the Juniors. The game 
only lasted seven innings, but 
during that time only two hits 
were made by the two teams com- 
bined. Ricketts had excellent 
control, and did not give free 
transportation to a single Junior. 

Morse, the elongated first-base- 
man, was on the firing line for 
the Juniors. He pitched gilt- 
edge ball, with the exception of 
his wildness. The iiopns were 
able to land only two in safe 
places, and but for the fact that 
he walked five men, hit four, and 
threw wild many times the game 
would have ended 0 to 0. The 
Juniors’ line-up was somewhat 
changed, but did not affect the 
strength of the team. 

Juniors — AB. R. H. PO 

Stennis. If. ... 3 0 0 0 

Gass, ss 3 0 0 0 

Morse, p 3 

Campbell, rf. . .3 

Brooks, c 2 

Crisler, c., lb.. .0 
Applewhite 2b, 
cf. :..... ’..2 
Phillips, lb. ... 2 
Johnson, 3b. . i2 , 0 0 
Whitson, cf. 2b. 2 0 0 



Morse 7. 

Base on Balls — Off Morse 5. 
Hit by Pitcher — Lewis 2. Till, 
W- B. Lewis. 

L T mpire — Collins. 



Classical Association Meets. 



nents are putting up the fight of 
their lives as they have lost twice 
in succession. Our representa- 
tives will leave on the 10th of 
May and speak on the night of 
the 12th. 



A. E. 
0 0 



0 

0 

0 

0 



0 

0 



2 0 0 
6 0 0 

11 1 
0 10 



Sophs- 



AB. R- H. PO. A. E 



Buck, c.^* 4 1 1 -6 1-0 



Prof. M. W. Swartz, of Millsaps 
College, left yesterday for Natch- 
ez, to attend the second annual 
meeting of the Classical Associa- 
tion of Mississippi. 

This meeting will be held in 
conjunction with the State Teach- 
ers’ Association, and many in- 
teresting papers are on the pro- 
gram to be read. The program 
follows : 

Reading of minutes of last 
meeting and appointment of 
committees. 

Our Craft. Its Use ana Purpose, 
M. W. Swartz. Millsaps College. 

Higher Standards, A. J. Aven, 
Mississippi College. 

The Value of Graduate Study 
for the Teacher of the Classics in 
the High School. Miss Fitz, Natch- 
ez Institute. 

Some experiences In Teaching 
High School Latin, Geo. G. Hurst, 
University Training School! 

Vergil in English, Christopher 
Longest. University of Missis- 
sippi- 

The Teaching of Vergil in the 
High School. Miss Neill, Oxford 
High School. 

The Study of Roman Customs 
and Dress as a Means of Keeping 
Class-room Interest Alive, Prof. 
Noble, Millsaps College. 

Efficiency in the Teaching of 
Second Year Latin. I. T. Gilmer, 

0 Laurel High School. 

The Fourth Year of High 
[School Latin. O. A. Shaw. Winona 
High School. 

The First Year’s Work in Lat- 
in: general discussion, led by J. 
E. Brown, Mississippi Heights 
Academy. 



Contest Goes to Greenwood. 

The Mississippi Intercollegiate 
Oratorical Contest, which takes 
place on May 14, is to be held in 
Greenwood. It wa3 thought once 
that it would go to Canton but 
by a vote of the officers of the 
association Greenwood was the 
lucky place. 

We hope to see every member 
of the faculty and every Millsaps 
student at this contest. The ex- 
penses will he very little as com- 
pared to the pleasure and good 
derived from the trip. Millsaps 
is going to win this year and we 
want all of our fellows to be 
present to cheer our speaker and 
show him that we appreciate 
what he has done for us. 



We can say nothing of the La- 
mar Anniversary other than it 
was a grand success. All the 
speakers filled then* parts with 
creit. Orator Brooks and Anni 
versarian Bailey knew their 
speeches well and delivered them 
so well that Judge Fletcher was 
afraid to speak for fear he would 
not do as well as they. Special 
mention, however, shoidd be made 
of Judge Fletcher’s address. We 
all saw very plainly from his ad- 
dress that he was also able to en- 
tertain a crowd of college stu- 
dents as jyell a S' prosecute a great 
criminal case or give instructions 
to a jury. 



P. C. Smashay. right tackle on 
last year’s Freshman team, stop- 
ped over en route to New Mexico 

- < .. H I ,1 ma 



m ordvr to 8ttery ^uisaps 

A good time is guarart^ 



trackeited. 
.ecd. 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



1R. C. pepper locals. 



^abertmsbei 




523 EAST CAPITOL STREET 

Full Line Suit Cases and (Lags 

Fine Tailoring is Our Specialty 



King H. Pullen, ’06, of the New 
Orleans Picayune, is spending his 
vacation in Jackson. 

What under the §un is the mat- 
ter with Bob Ruff? Are all of 
his ancestors dead or has his girl 
gone back on him? Possibly 
both, but the latter is more piaus- 



Phonk 1002 Jackson, Miss. 



ible. His face is as long as a 
clothes line and he is constantly 
muttering to himself — Rustoi* — 



Student’s Fountain 
Pen $1.00 

will save you much trouble. 

Eyrich & Co. 




MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Jackson, Miss. 

Millsaps College offers courses leadi 
to two degrees: B. A. & B. S. 

For Catalogue, address 

W. B. MURRAH, Pres 



RAZORS 



The latest mania for the pom- 
padour is the teddy-bear hair cut 



All Work Guaranteed 



Mr. E. H. Mounger is sick this 
week. 



J. S. Duke 



Peg Bufkin, the old reliable, 
will do your typewriting quicker 
and cheaper than anyone else. 
Work guaranteed. See him at the 
Dormitory; 



We were glad to have several 
of the Mississippi College stu- 
dents at the Lamar Anniversary, 
including Mr. Johnson, their rep- 
resentative to the M. I- O. A. 



for a College Boy is the 



The Rev. Dr. Hill, of Vicks- 
burg will preach the annual Y. 
M. C. A. sermon. 



Go to 

JACKSON MERCANTILE 
COMPANY. 

for Fancy Groceries and all kinds 
of Feed Stuffs. Same quality at 
lower prices.. Prompt deliverty is 
our motto. 



HOWARD AND FOSTER 



Mr. J. H. Brooks, of the Senior 
Class, went home last week. 



Guaranteed to be as good as any 
other Shoe costing $5.00 or less. 
We are always glad to accommo- 
date Millsaps College boys when- 
ever we can. 



Don’t Fail To See Him 
Before Having Your 
Receptions. 

Phone 201. 502 E. Capitol St. 



Will some one put Tom Phil- 
lips wise a3 to who Henry W. 
Grady was. 



G. W. SISTRUNK 



Air. L. B. Jones was at home 
several days last week- 

Mr. “Hump’’ Cam): mil is sick 
this week with the mmrj.-s 



Handles all Kinds of 



Come to see ns. 



TATOM SHOE CO 



Goods always fresh and prices 
reasonable . 

Nice line of Stationery on hand 
Give him a trial 



Ed Brewer, of the Junior Class, 
was sick for several days last 
week. 

The Junior History Class is 
glad to report that they have 
purchased the last text book for 
the year. 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 
College Photographer. 



The State University continues 
to uphold her reputation in the 
baseball line. We have recently 
noticed that the team won the se- 
ries with S. P. U. 



Jackson. 



Capitol St., near Bridge. 



Don’t walk by our beautiful 
display of wall papers without 
inspection. 

HALL-MILLER 
Paint and Glass Co. 

Wholesale Paints for All Purposes. 
Ill State Street. Phone 865. 



Dr. Murrah has returned from 
Richmond, Ya., where the Edu- 
cational Board of the M. E. 
Church, South, was in session 



Do You Know 



Mr. Crea Pugh;, of Shreveport, 
visited friends and elubmate-, on 
Ihe campus Sunday afternoon. 

Quite a number of the students 
•re going to take the State exam- 
ination Friday and Saturday. 
They wish 1 3 expound some of 
their stored up knowledge we 
suppose 



When clothes are soiled 
Have them boiled 
Get Eizzy 
Ring Izzy 

,UA«w>nAy inn Laundi 

ke them have a. good - 



that the Kirkland Boys have the 
best and cheapest line of Pennants 
on earth. See them. 



gyi 




A, < , ’ -ShM 






urn & j 


f i ' m 


% - J 







! 

y 

THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



QUAE FIANT, EX HOC COGNOSCES. 



VOLUME ONE 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, MAY 7, 1909 NUMBER EIGHTEEN 



ATHLETICS. 



Galloway Society. 



As it is very near the end of 
school and as all the class games 
have been played off there will 
not be very much more done on 
the athletic field this year. In a 
few weeks all of this year’s ath- 
letes will be going to their homes, 
some to come back next year, 
some to go elsewhere and some 
to stay away from school forever. 
To those who intend to come back 
we would like to urge them not 
to let their college spirit and de- 
sire for inter-collegiate athletics 
die down. From the late reports 
from the different district con- 
ferences we have no other idea 
than that we will have inter- 
collegiate athletics in every form 
during the next session. 

Now it is a sure fact that if we 
have intercollegiate athletics we 
are going to have players to 
represent the different teams. 
The best way to get these players 
is for us to come back ourselves 
and bring some good athlete and 
student with us. If during the 
summer we remain idle and do 
not talk up our interests we will 
come back to school next session 
with a‘ very gloomy prospect for 
athletics. Be sure not to say any- 
thing against the college because 
we haven’t had athletics hereto- 
fore. we will never succeed in 
that way. 



College Team Selected. 

Manager Stennis has finally 
chosen the college team. While 
thi '3 team will play no games we 
see that it is a good one and 
could well compete with the oth- 
er colleges- of the State. The 
following is the line up : 

Ricketts, catcher. 



Owing to the approaching close 
of the session, very little interest 
has been manifested in the So- 
ciety work here of late. The at- 
tendance Friday night was very 
small but the debate was fairly 
good. The question : Kesolved, 

That Great Combination of Cap- 
ital Is an Evil to the Country, 
was ably affirmed by Messrs. An- 
derson, Brown and Frederick 
Jones, while Messrs. Blount, 
Ramsey and Mayfield upheld the 
negative. The question was de- 
cided in favor of the affirmative. 

The impromptu debate was the 
central figure of the evening. 
After Mr. J. Hendrix Mitchell 
had made an earnest appeal for 
Woman Suffrage, the Rev. Willie 
N. Thomas arose and', as soon as 
the sergeant-at-arms could quiet 
the applause, he began to speak 
and with all the brilliance and 
eloquence of a Demosthenes he 
snatched victory from the jaws 
of defeat. Many said they 
thought that Mr. B. A. Boutwell 
had returned, while others con- 
soled themselves with the fact 
that he was from Sullivan’s Hol- 
low. 

The following officers were 
elected for the fourth term : Vice 
president, H. M. Frizell. record- 
ing secretary. Ramsey, ana assist- 
ant secretary, F. M. Blount. The 
following question was adopted 
for two weeks hence. Resolved, 
That United States Senators 
Should Be Elected by the Popu- 
lar vote. 



History Repeats Itself. 

The country has stood aghast 
while the press has told the story 
of the kidnapping of the Wnitla 
child. We have listened to this 





Morse, J. M., first base. 
Morse, W. E., second base. 
Peeples, D., shortstop. 
Peeples, A. R., third base. 
Spann, center field. 

Collins, W. E., right field, 
'jfaflv.e^se, left field. 

bite, pitcher, 
itcher. 



story with a great deal of in- 
terest and horror, congratulating 
ourselves, however, that it was 
far away and that our fair south- 
land would never experience any 
such terrible catastrophe. But 
oh horror of horrors'! Right here 
n this fair Southland; here in 
I'Lhis beautiful magnolia State; 



here in the capital city of Missis- 
sippi; yes, right here on our- cam- 
pus, a dastardly deed was done. 
Little “Fido,” the pretty little 
golden haired “purp” belonging 
to Caruthers Sullivan, the son of 
our professor, Dr. James Ma- 
gruder Sullivan, was shorn of his 
beautiful locks sometime be- 
tween the hours of one and four 
o’clock Friday mom. Not only 
was he clipped but hisyoung sis- 
ter “Gyp” and his elder brother 
“Jack” were abducted and kept 
in a dark dungeon for the greater 
part of the following day. 

At first the innoeent and angel- 
like Ed Brewer was suspected of 
this horrible crime, but traces of 
a much deeper and fouler plot 
were soon unearthed. Two high- 
ly responsible men of great ve- 
racity, Tom Stennis and Bob 
Ruff swore that tney had seen 
their roommates, who are no 
other than those two aeh villains 
and epobates, Mark Guinn and R. 
M. Brown, consorting together 
very much of late and that they 
had been laying a foul plot tv) 
kidnap Dr. James Magruder Sul- 
livan’s puppy dogs, and hold 
them for a ransom which would 
be no less than a pass in Junior 
Physics. 

To show their dearly beloved 
professor that they were daring 
and devilish men, they went even 
so far as to shear a few of poor 
Fido’s locks and leave them as a 
memento to show that they will 
do something desperate. 

As soon as all these facts were 
known all eyes were turned to- 
wards the rooms of these two 
malefactor^, but only their ab- 
sences were found. 

It is not certain when they had 
gone nor where we pious 
“purps” had been incarcerated, 
but through the diligent, magnifi- 
cent and brilliant work of the 
venerable mother Dr. James Ma- 
gruder Sullivan and his eldest 
son, Caruthers, they were at last 
seen ambling up the road at high 
noon on Saturday, at a pace char- 
acteristic of a mac after 
own funeral. 



home destroyers were enticing 
the little purps up to Houlka, 
the home of Mark Guinn, wuere 
he says that men get drua-c .md 
ride fence rails home, but while 
on their way they had taken 
more of their share of an article 
atrifle stronger than Mrs. Win- 
slow's Soothing Syrup, and the 
doggies made their escapade back 
to their home and fireside. These 
facts have not yet been verified 
by “Ant” Jones. Although he 
was asleep when the crime took 
place yet he knows all about it. 

COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM. 

Friday, June 4. 

11 o’clock a. m. — Freshman Prize 
Declamation. 

8 o’clock p.m. — Debate by Rep- 
resentatives of the Galloway 
and Lamar Literary Societies. 

Saturday, June 5. 

11 o’clock a. m. — Sophomore Ora- 
torical Contest. 

Sunday, June 6. 

11 o’clock a. m. — Commencement 
Sermonb by Bishop Seth Ward. 

8 o’clock p.m. — Sermon before 
Young Men’s Christian Asso- 
ciation. by Rev. Felix R. Hill, 
Jr., Vicksburg. 

Monday, June 7. 

9 ’clock a. m. — Annual Meet- 
ing of the Board of Trustees. 

10 o’clock a. m.— Graduating 
Speeches and Delivery of Med- 
als. 

8 o’clock p.m— Alumni Reun- 
ion. 

Tuesday, June 8. 

10:30 o’clock a. m.— Alumni Ad- 
dress by Rev. T. M. Bradley, 
Jonesboro. 

11 o’clock a. m— Annual Ad- 
dress, by Hon. C. H. Alexan- 
der, Jackson; Conferring of 
Degrees. 



Don’t fail to attend the lawn 
party at Prof. Huddleston s this 
evening. Every Millsaps boy is 



inviteu. 

It ijov.^ 11,8 thcce I wo j teed. 

--X — - — 













THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



The Purple and White 

Published Weekly by the Junior 
Class of Millsaps College 

ROBT. H. RUFF .... Editor-ln-Chl«-i 
E. C. BREWER .... Asmeiate Edito J 
A. B. CAMPBELL .... Athletic Editor 
MISS MARGARET SAUMS . Social Editor 
D. R. WASSON .... Y. M. C. A. Editor 

JOHN GASS Local Editor 

W. E. PHILLIPS Loca Editor 

M. L. NEILL . Business Mgr 

A. F. KELLY .... Assistant Bus. Mgf 

All matter fer publication should be ad- 
dressed to the Editor-In-Chief. 

All business communications should be ad- 
dressed to the Business Mgr., M. L. Neill. 

Entered as seacond class matter January 22, 
1909, at the postoffice at Jackson Miss., 
under act of Congress, March, 3,il879 

Bingle Copy Per Annum 50 Cents 
Two Copies Per Annum 75 Cents 

EDITORIAL. 



Remember the Fight. 

Our session is nearing a close 
and some of our boys have al- 
ready gone home. But before 
leaving it is neeessary that they 
be impressed with the importance 
of the great fight which lies be- 
fore us. That is the fight to have 
the question of intercollegiate 
athletics turned over to the fac- 
ulty and the board of trustees. 

Sinee the recent action of one 
of the conferences, our hoys have 
been very hard at work with 
their studies, playing some class 
games but rot with the wonted 
enthusiasm. They have gone 
about things in a manly way 
and have presented their side of 
the question in a fair and square 
way. 

So let’s make a campaign this 
summer to see every minister in 
the two conferences, with our 
student body from every part of 
the State it will be possible to 
see nearly every one personally 
and present the question. We 
must also win our parents over 
and get them to interest the 
preachers. 

What wa desire is to get the 
conferences to turn the question 
of athletics over to the faculty 
are men of the highest ability, 
men who have made a special 
study of college problems. It is 
nothing but right that they should 
have control of it, as this ques- 
tion is always under the super- 
vision of the faculties and boards 
of trustees of other colleges and 
universities. It is impossible for 
two hundred and fifty men to 
thoroughly understand all ques- 
tions which relate to the manage- 
ment of a college. Some of these 
men have never even seen the 



college yet as it is their vote 
counts for as much as our pres- 
ident’s. 

This does not mean intercolle- 
giate athletics, but the bringing 
of the question into the hands 
of men who best know the needs 
of our college. Surely with a 
board of trustees consisting of 
such men as our own Bishop Gal- 
loway, the venerable Dr. Black, 
our honored founder, and other 
men of great character, no harm 
can be done. 

Don’t antagonize those who 
oppose us in the conferences, for 
they are men of power and good. 
It is by their sacrifices that our 
college has been made possible 
and they are deeply concerned in 
everything that pertains to our 
welfare, so we have only to show 
them that this step is necessary 
for the welfare of our college 
and they will give us their hearty 
support. 

It is a significant as well as a 
pleasing fact that every Millsaps 
man who has gone out from our 
walls i 3 standing as solid as a 
phalanx on our side. This should 
be enough to convince every per- 
son who opposes intercollegiate 
athletics, that after a man has 
spent from four to five years at 
a college and understands its 
needs, that he will come out and 
advocate intercollegiate athletics. 

So let’s make a thorough, 
earnest and energetic campaign 
to see every Methodist minister 
in Mississippi before school opens 
this fall. If we do I believe that 
they will be willing to turn it 
over to the board of trustees and 
faculty when the conferences 
meet, however, it may be settled 
when they take hold of it. The 
men who oppose us are honest 
in their opinions and beliefs and 
have not the least hostility to- 
ward the college. So if we will 
only show them the real condi- 
tion of things as they really ex- 
ist here, they will be equally as 
earnest in favor of athletics. 

The recent action of the Wino- 
na District Conference means 
much. They passed resolutions 
memorializing the North Missis- 
sippi Conference to turn the ques- 
tion over to the faculty and 
board of trustees. This is en- 
couraging as this conference con- 
tains some of the ablest preach- 
ers in Mississippi and it wes 
brought without the stu- 

idents asking *° r -^e exp.vu 



quite a number of district con- 
ferences to pass the same resolu- 
tions in a few weeks. So get 
busy, fellows; it’s up to us. 



WOMAN’S DEPARTMENT 

We are glad to note how rap- 
idly letters are coming to us and 
although it is impossible for us 
to answer all of them directly 
upon their receipt yet we hope in 
time to be able to satisfy all our 
questioners. This department has 
already seemed to become very 
popular but we want the public.' 
whether subscribers to this paper 
or not, to write to us Tor mis- 
information desired along any 
lines from the question of apos- 
tolic succession and predestina- 
tion to the chemical and physical 
properties of Chili saltpetre ! — 
Ed. 



Jackson, Miss. April 18, 1909. 

Dear Editor — I write to you in 
regard to some freckles which 
my stepmother says disfigures 
my countenance very much. 1 
think that I have about nine or 
ten. I find that it is impossible 
for me to remove them. I cannot 
myself count but eight but Tom 
says that there are two under 
my left eye and I guess he knows. 
Can you advise me how to re- 
move them. 

Just as sure as God made little 
apples we, the editors of this phe- 
nomenal division of this paper 
are up against it. Ye gods and 
little fishes, kings and collar but- 
tons ! What in the world do we 
know about removing freckles. 
We do not desire to transform 
anyone’s countenance into geo- 
graphical map picking each, by 
describing two under the left eye, 
six inches from the apex of the 
nose and apply as directed. A 
countenance bounded on the 
north by rats and puffs, on the 
south by ruching and on the east 
and west by Rosalind paint 
would be easy enough to de- 
scribe and locate both by the 
Cartesian and Polar systems any 
point therein contained. We 
have, however, taken pains to 
consult a specialist for skin dis- 
eases and he gives the following 
as a sure remedy : Upon rising, 
apply buttermilk. tA 10:30 dis- 
solve some nail-rust in clear wa- 
ter and applv externally. Con- 
tinue the process at an interval 
of two hours until every sign r 



removed. This suggestion may 
prove a good one but we advise 
that the writer of the above let- 
ter stay under cover until night 
and then sally forth in the dark. 
This will remove them from the 
prying eyes of passerbys. But, 
in conclusion we would fain 
quote what we read in another 
woman’s paper in regard to the 
same thing: “Boils may come 

and boils may go, but freckles 
are with us forever.” 

Jackson, Miss., April 19, 1909. 
Dear Editor — I was the happy 
participant at a picnic not long 
ago and since then I have been 
infested with red-bugs or poison 
oak or something, which I have 
not as yet been able to remove. 
Will you kindly, advise me where 
I can get what I will need for 
their hasty removal. 

Here is where the first laws of 
man and nature conflict. The 
first law of man is self-defense. 
The first law of nature is live 
and let live. If we advise her 
to scratch in self-defense we 
would be violating the law of na- 
ture, and encourage bloody mur- 
der. while on the other hand she 
writes for a remedy as we take 
it in self-defense. We were try- 
ing to see if in any way we could 
figure the insanity plea into this 
and thereby an outlet for so 
bloody a proceeding, but we find 
neither hereditary nor temporary 
silliness. The act of going on the 
picnic was deliberated and as is 
always the case, one day is “pic- 
nic ” and the next is “pick tick.” 
We cannot offer any advice ex- 
cept “root hog or die,” which 
would be more appropriate ad- 
vice to the army which is doing 
the invading stunt. 

Jackson, Miss, April 19, 1909. 

Dear Editor— I don’t know 
whether you have ever been in 
love or not. I have loved one 
young man for several years but 
my one trouble lies in my ability 
to make him tell me that he cares 
anything for me. Now that leap- 
year ha 3 passed what am I going 
to do? His name is Arthur and 
he is rather tall and slim, with 
light hair and is a Sophomore. • 

If we tell her to hit him over 
the head with a rolling pin, he 
will sue us for damages. If we 
advise her to use kind treatment 
and thus win his love 
sr up our office. T 



PURPLE AND WHITE 



this paper would personally 
rather fall in a sewer pipe than 
to fall in love and maybe Arthur 
is the same way. We cannot ad- 
vise in this case and freely ac- 
knowledge it. We would indeed 
be glad to receive any suggestion 
that anyone would offer a 3 we 
wish to please all. Wait until 
next leap year and then do your 
asking, is the only way we see 
out of this. 



Y. M. C. A. 



I The interest taken in the Asso- 
ciation seems to be waning. What 
has become of those good resolu- 
tions made during the meeting! 
We know that examinations are 
near at hand and we are very 
busy, but we should not neglect 
our Cnristian duties. If you can- 
not attend on Friday night, sure- 
ly you can come on Sunday 
nights. Of course you would 
not put up the excuse of study- 
ing on Sunday night. 

It is not right to put a man to 
the trouble of getting up some- 
thing to say anl then let nim say 
it to empty chairs. Another rea- 
son, I suppose, for the small at- 
tendance is on account of the 
early hour of the meeting. You 
must remember that the days are 
getting longer and you must get 
ready t.o come to the service be- 
fore dark. 

We must not neglect Christ 
and fall by the wayside in the 
N last hour, for if we are ever 
going to need Him it will be in 
these last trying hours. He is a 
friend that is able to help and is 
willing to help, provided we try 
to help ourselves. I hardly think 
He would help a lazy man. A 
great man said once that there 
was no place in heaven for a lazy 
man, and I think he was about 
right. 

Mr. Anderson talked to us Fri- 
day night on the subject of 
“Faith in Prayer.” His text 
was, “Whatsoever ye ask in my 
name I will do it.” He encour- 
aged us to have faith in God and 
believe that we would receive the 
things we ask for. He said that 
we ought to take Christ as a 
personal frieiuJ and try to feel 
that we are talking face to face 
with Hi mand that He is not 

away off somewhere. The great- 
— — f of the lai ... 

our prayer life is 

i realize God as 

— i — - ; <■ 



an omnipresent Father. Anoth- 
er fault is our double-mindedness, 
our inability to concentrate our 
thoughts. We know not whether 
to attribute this fault to the evil 
spirit or to some psychological 
working of the mind. From the 
contiguity of thoughts or the as- 
sociation of ideas with the ob- 
jects for which we are praying 
our mind wanders away from the 
real object. 

Mr. Thomas led the service 
Sunday night. He impressed us 
with the beauty, the greatness 
and the great cost of Heaven. He 
acknowledged that he did not 
know what Heaven was like nor 
where it was. but that what he 
did know was that we should be 
satisfied and if we were satisfied 
what more could we wish for. 
He also pictured to us his idea of 
the awfulness of Hell. 



Lawn Party. 

w 

This afternoon, beginning at 
half-past four o’clock, the Mill- 
saps Jewels will serve refresh- 
ments on Prof. Huddleston’s 
lawn, the proceeds to go to the 
charitable work of the society. 
The five socials given by the Jew- 
els in February was quite a suc- 
cess from a business standpoint 
as well as socially, and the host- 
esses have been urged frequently 
to entertain again. 

No program has been prepared 
for this afternoon’s affair, and 
so no admission will be charged. 
The Jewels will be glad to see 
all their friends and their friends’ 
friends in a social' way. and inci- 
dentally to sell— until the supply 
gives out — the product of their 
skill in the line of ice cream, 
fruit ices and cake. 

Everybody is invited. 

Lamar Society. 

The Lamar Literary Society 
was called to order promptly at 
8 o’clock by President Augustus 
Foster Kelly. 

It can be truthfully said the 
program for the evening was the 
best rendered in the Lamar Hall. 
The orator and declaimer were 
both present and delivered strong 
and touching speeches. They are 
to be commended for the great 
amount of time and work they 
spent preparing ^bese speeches. 
As a general rule tfie orator and 
declaimer are absent nd this of 



course detracts considerably from 
the program. 

But let us not forget the de- 
bate. Never before in the history 
of the society has there been 
such bursts of eloquence as spout- 
ed from the mouths of John Ma- 
hogan Crisler and Cicero John- 
son. The word pictures they 
painted would have at one mo- 
ment the hall fairly ringing with 
shouts and at others the whis- 
pers of an infant could have been 
heard. Shouts came from all 
quarters “Demosthenes is sur- 
passed and Cicero outclassed. One 
of the oldest niembers of the so- 
ciety openly declared that he had 
never heard such speeches since 
way back in the 80 ’s when his 
Uncle Sebastin. ran for constable 
against one Elmire Jones, and 
was defeated by a very small 
vote. Another said that he had 
heard Mr. Bryan and Mr. Roose- 
velt and a host of other good 
speakers but had never in all his 
life, thirty-one years, heard any- 
thing to come up with that 
speech of Mr. Johnson’s. 

When the argument closed the 
president ordered the judges, 
Messrs. Guinn, Carson and Buf- 
kin, to retire to the ante-room 
and make up their decision. After 
having remained in the ante- 
room only three hours the judges 
returned, and announced that 
they were unable to reaeh an 
agreement, as there were no 
points made on either side. 

There will be only one more 
meeting of the society this ses- 
sion, and that next Friday even- 
ing. The program for that night 
promises to be a good one and 
we hope to see a goodly number 

The program is as follows : 
present. 

Debate — “Resolved That It 
Would Be for the Best Interest 
of Our Nation for It to Enlarge 
Its Navy.” 

Affirmative — McClure, Guinn, 

Green, A. A. 

Negative — Wimberly, Steen, 

Ray. 

Declaimer — Graham. 

Orator — Monger. 

All members are requested to 
be present. 



Quite a number of the boys and 
girls took the State examination 
given for teachers last Friday and 
Saturday. We suppose they wish 
to impart some of their stored up 
kno r °dge ( 1 ). 



LOCALS. 



Mr. J. M. Morse is ill this 
week. 

The climate is still] affecting 
Mr. Randolph Moore ’3 health. 

Mr. W. D. Cameron was init- 
iated into the order of the Phi 
Delta fraternity Tuesday night 

Miss Knowles is not at school 
this week on account of sickness 
in the family. 

Miss Mary Boley spent several 
days in Canton last week. 

Mr. A. B. Campbell was unani- 
mously elected the leader ol‘ the 
yelling. 

W. A. Williams, ’07, who has 
had a highly successful year as 
1 principal of the Edwards High 
j School, passed through on his 
way to Natchez. W T irt has been 
unanimously elected principal for 
another year. 

Mr. T. S. Borlton, an old Mill- 
saps boy, was visiting friends on 
the campus Monday. 

Messrs. Applewhite, Mullins. 
Welch and R. H. Ruff attended 
the State Teachers’ Association 
at Natchez. 

Dr. A. M. Muckenfuss, of the 
chair of chemistry at the Univer- 
sity. was a welcome visitor last 
week. 

One of the features of the 
State Teachers’ Association was 
the addresses of Prof. Swartz and 
Prof. S. G. Noble. 

For special prices on $35 suits 
of clothes call on Hendrix Mitch- 
ell. 

Mr. D. T. Ruff, who was a 
member of the graduating class 
of last year, is on the campus at 
present. Tom is going to make 
up some work in oijder to secure 
a B. S. degree. 

Mr. T. P. Ramsey, of Durant, 
went home last week on account 
of some trouble with his eye3. 
He will not return until next 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 




that the Kirkland Boys have the 



WE MAKE SPECIAL PRICES FOR PRINTING 

Association Minutes 



and School Catalogs 



and all kinds of Book Work. 

We not only print Books, but we print Newspapers, 
Posters (any size), School Programs, Wedding Invi- 
tations, Letter Heads, Note Heads, Bill Heads, 
Statements, Visiting Cards; in fact anything that can 
be printed. 

No Orders Too Large For Our Capacity, None Too Small For Our 
Most Prompt and Careful Attention. 

Write For Prices. 

Hederman rotifers. 

New Building Cor. Pearl and Congress Sts. 
JACKSON. MISSISSIPPI 



It is Easy 
to Shave 

When you have one of our dollar or $5.00 Safety Razors, there 
being no danger of cutting yourself, no trouble of sharpening 
blades and you will find it such a convenience to oe able to 
shave quickly and comfortably, without waiting. Free trial and 
money back, if you are not pleased. 



Eyrich & Co, 



GOTO 



— Miss Mattie Nell Cooper, who 
has been teaching school in Green 
"| county, js at home on the cam- 
i pus at present. 



k>« wu« Refreshments 

CAT At HIS 

RESTAURANT. 

Don’t Fail To See Him 
Before Having Your 
Receptions. 

Phone 201. 502 E. Capitol St. 















■1 \ 


J 



Don’t walk by our beautiful 
display of wall papers without 
inspection. 

HALL-MILLER 
Paint and Glass Co. 

Wholesale Paints for All Purposes. 
Ill State Street. Phone 865. 

MTLLSAPS COLLEGE 

Jackson, Miss. 

Sllllsaps College offers courses leading 
to two degrees: B. A. <& B. S. 

For Catalogue, address 

\V. B. MURRAH, Pres. 



Mr. R. B. Alexander says he is 
going to begin studying in a few 
days. 

Grady Butler will lead the Y. 
M. C. A. tonight and Oscar 
Rainey will lead Sunday night. 

The Rev. L. E. Alford, of Long 
Beach, Miss., conducted the de- 
] votional exercises at chapel Mon- 
day morning. Bro. Alford was 
the first ministerial student to 
graduate at the institution. 

Mr. S. E. Williamson, of Col- 
lins, was on the campus to see 
frienda last week. 

Ike Enochs heard the fire bell 
several days ago and said “Lis- 
ten at the wedding bells.” 

Mr. Bob Ruff, editor-in-chief of 
the Purple and White, is ill at 
present. 

Mr. J. M. Morse, of the Junior 
class, has been appointed athletic 
editor of the Purple and White. 

When clothes are soiled 
Have them boiled 
Get Eizsy 
Ring Izzj 

Jackson Steam laundry. 

PHONE 730^. 



best and cheapest line of Pennants 
on earth. See them. 

RAZORS ^ 

Honed 15e 

All Work Guaranteed 

J. S. Duke lk 

tR. C. ipepper 

^ at)CraaSlln The Best Shoe 

and , 

for a College Boy is the 

HOWARD AND FOSTER 

523 EAST CAPITOL STREET $3 50 and $4 Q0 

Full Line Suit Cases and Bags 

Fine Tailoring is Our Specialty Guaranteed to be as good as any 
Phone 1002 Jackson, Miss, other Shoe costing $5.00 or less. 

We are always glad to accommo- 

Go to 

JACKSON MERCANTILE date Millsa P s College hoys when- 

COMPANY. ever we can. 

for Fancy Groceries and all kinds 

, Come t.o se° us. 

of Feed Stuffs. Same quality ab 

lower prices. . Prompt deliverty is TATOM SHOE CO. 

our motto. 

— I __ ______ ^ ^ — _ _ __ — — 

G. W. SISTRUNK 

„ ,, „ „. . , THE DANIEL STUDIO 

Handles all Kinds of 

Good things to eat. College Photographer. 

Goods always fresh and prices Jackson, 

reasonable . ^ 

Nice line oj. Stationery on hand Capitol St., near 
$> a him a trial T 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 
College Photographer. 



Jackson, 



Capitol St., near ,' p 

T 



Do You Know 







The Purple and White. 





QUAE FIANT, EX HOC COGNOSCES. 


■ 


VOLUME ONE 


JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, JUNE 5, 1909. 


NUMBER NINETEEN 




Kappa Sigma Banquet. 


Episcopate, Mississippi is placed 


Men’s Christian Association, and 


are the speakers and their sub- 



The annual Kappa Sigma ban- 
quet was held at the Edwards on 
Thursday night. It has been a 
custom with alpha upsilon to en- 
tertain their alumni brothers at 
a banquet given in their honor. 
It is always looked forward to 
with great expectations and it 
ushers in the social features of 
the commencement. The banquet 
this year even surpassed those 
of former years in number, bril- 
liancy and good cheer. 

So fast did time fly and so un- 
confined was joy that it was two 
o’clock when the gallant fraters 
and their fair sisters were com- 
pelled to say good bye. 



in that of Bishop Hoss, of Ten- 
nessee. The late bishop’s mantl; 
eoukl not h«rve descended on one 
more worthy, or who will come so 
near filling his place. From im- 
pressions of personal acquaint- 
ance no less than his reputation 
as a preacher and publicist, the 
Herald congratulates the Metho- 
dist churches and congregations 
of the State upon the succession 
of Bishop Hoss to the place held 
by the late eminent and lamented 
Bishop Galloway.” 

The death of Bishop Galloway 
leaves a vacancy in the line of 
bishops which must soon be filled, 
and it is the earnest wish of the 



a copy sent to his bereaved fam- 
ily. 

T. A. Stennis, 
W. A. Welch, 
Robt. H. Ruff, 
Committee From Young Men’s 
Christian Association. 



Mr. Charlton A. Alexander was j friends of Dr. W. B. Murrah that 



toastmaster and he acquitted him- 
self in his usual graceful manner. 
The following toasts were given 
by other members of the frater- 
nity: 

Toasts. 

The Ladies — Robt. Ricketts, 
nhe Kinetic Energy m « uoat 
— Thos. L. Bailey. 

What Kappa Sigma Means to 
Me — Robt. M. Brown. 

John Henry on Frats — J. A. 
Alexander. 

Comfessions of a Kappa Sigma 
Badge — F. E. Gunter. 

Some Kappa Sigma Secrets — 
Robt. H. Ruff, 

The following menu was served 
after the brothers ana sisters had 
listened to the thrilling strains of 
Kappa Sigma music: 

Menu 

Celery Olives 

Consomme 

Fish Saratoga Chips 

Chicken on Toast 

Mashed Potatoes 

Punch 

Waldorf Salad 

Brick Ice Cream* Assorted Cakes 
Roquefort Cheese 

Water Crackers 
Coffee 



he may be chosen. He is learned 
in language and skilled in theolo- 
gy, is an able representative of 
the great church to which he be- 
longs, is a preacher of force and 
pastor of power, possessing the 
highest order of executive abil- 
ity, and would reflect credit upon 
the high office and the Methodist 
denomination should he be elected 
bishop. — Clarion-Ledger. 



DR. MURRAH FOR BISHOP. 

The Vicksburg Herald prints 
-the following item which will 
meet with ready endorsement: 
“It has been published that Li 
the assignment of the territory 
of the late Bishop Galloway's 



In Memoriam. 

Whereas, God in His infinite 
wisdom has seen fit to take from 
our midst, 'our dearly beloved 
friend and fellow student, A. C. 
Anderson, and / 

Whereas, Knowing his life to 
have been noble and upright, and [ 
appreciating the beautiful Chris- 1 
tian example which he has given 
us, therefore be it 
Resolved, First, That we. the 
student body, bowing our heads 
in humble submission to the Di 
vine decree, do sorrowfully 
mourn this great loss. 

Second, That as members of the 
Young Men’s Christian Associa- 
tion and Personal Workers Band, 
we have lost one of our most un- 
selfish and loyal workers. 

Third, That we extend our pro- 
found sympathies to the bereay; 
ed parents and his Ceart-broken 
brother. 

Fourth, That a copy of these 
resolutions be inserted in the col- 
lege publications, a copy spread 
«>ii, the minutes of the Young 



Commencement Exercises. 
Friday, June 4. 

11 a. m. — Freshman Prize Dec- 
lamation. Following are the 
speakers and their subjects: 

The Speech That Made History 
— R. D. Peets. 

The Political Isolation of the 
South — J. B. Kirkland. 

Eulogy on Lamar — Robert E. 
Steen. 

An Appeal to the Citizens — D. 
D. Cameron. 

Bunker Hill Oration — W. E. 
Smith. 

Stars and Stripes — D. W. Buf- 
kin. 

Address to Confederate Sol- 
diers — G. C. Slark. 

Irish Patriotism — E. H Green. 

8 p. m. — Debate by represent- 
atives of the Galloway and Lamar 
Literary Societies. Th* speakers 
from the Lamars are J. W. Crislet 
and A. B. Campbell: for tiia Gal- 
loways. W. R. Applewhite and F. 
S. Williams. Question : Resolved 
that the Cabinet system of Eng- 
land is better than the Commit-1 !* 
System of America. 

Saturday, June 5. 

11 a. m. Sophomore Oratorical 
Contest. The following are the 
speakers and their subjects : 

The Need of the Age — James 
Lewis Buck. 

The New Tariff and the Aver- 
age Citizen — Millard Bishop 
Jumper. 

The Feasibility of Mr. Taft’s 
Views— Robert Earlie Stuart. 

The Spirit of Mechanism — Fred 
William Wimberly. — 

Sunday, June 6. 

11 a. m. — Commencement Ser- 
mon by Bishop Seth Ward. 

8 p. m. — Sermon before Young 
Men’s Christian Association by 
Rev. Felix R. Hill, Jr. 

Monday, June 7. 

10 a, m. — Seior Contest and De- 
livery of Medals. The following 



jects : 

National Immortality — Thomas 
L. Bailey. 

The Spirit of the Age — Joseph 
Howard Brooks. 

Favoritism in Legislation — Rob- 
ert J. Mullins. 

Twentieth Century Tendencies 
— Basil Ferdinando Witt. 

8 p. m. — Alumni Reunion. 

Tuesday, June 8. 

10.30 a. m. — Alumni Address 
by Rev. T. M. Bradley. 

11 a. m. — Annual Address, by 
Hon. C. H. Alexander. 

Conferring of Degrees. 



We wish to remind the fellows 
of the College Calendars which 
have been gotten out by Dr. 
Walmsley, our efficient secretary, 
at much cost of time and labor. 
All of the calendars have not yet 
been disposed of and it should be 
the duty and privilege of every 
collegian to carry one of these 
home with him as a souvenir of 
(be session. None of the college 
publications make as appropriate 
gift as one of the calendars. 

Other institutions tret out a cal- 
endar every year and would as 
soon think of dropping their 
monthly magazine as they would 
dropping it. And certainly Mill- 
saps students are not willing to 
admit by their conduct they are 
behind other students in their 
loyalty to their college and inter- 
est in her publications. 

Let us arouse from our lethar- 
gy and get behind all of our pub- 
lications and push them to the 
front. We can either help by 
essential as the other. If you 
Essential as the other. If you 
are a mediocre and dead set on 
remaining one, go home and stay 
there or go to some other insti- , 
tution which is more in need of 
your kind than Millsaps is, and 
let some good, energetic, appre- 
ciative fellow take your place. 

So fellows let’s show our ap- 
preciation for what our prolessor 
has done by getting a calendar 
or else we will brand ourselves as 
cheap and unappreciative, and in 
the future our calendars will be 
as a tale that has been told. 



The Purple and White 

Published Weekly by the Junior 
Class of Millsaps College 

ROBT. H. RUFF .... Editor-in-CbieJ 
E. C. BREWER .... Associate EditoJ 
A. B. CAMPBELL .... Athletic Editor 
MISS MARGARET SAUM8 . Social Editor 
D. R. WASSON .... Y. M. G. A. Editor 

JOHN GASS Local Editor 

W. E. PHILLIPS . .... Loca Editor 

M. L. NEILL Business Mgr 

A. t. KELLY .... Assistant Bus. Mfff 

All matter for publication should be ad- 
dressed to the Editor-in-Chief. 

All business communications should be ad- 
dressed to the Business Mgr., M. L. Neill. 

Entered as seacond class matter January 22, 
1909, at the postofflce at Jackson Miss.', 
under act of Congress, March, 3, 1879 

Single Copy Per Annum 50 Cents 
Two Copies Per Annum 75 Cents 



With this number of The Pur- 
ple and White volume 1 comes to 
a close. Launched under unfa- 
vorable circumstances, with the 
cry coming from all sides, “It 
can’t be done,” with many crit- 
ics and few helpers, are some of 
! the things our weekly has had to 
contend with in its short life. 
But its experimental stage is now 
over and its day of usefulness 
should be at hand. 

The Purple and White was not 
organized to antagonize any move- 
ment or to attempt to take the 
place of either Collegian or Boba- 
shula, but merely to be a supple- 
ment to their work. We have 
fought for athletics, have stood 
for higher standards in our lit- 
erary work, have endeavored to 
make our Y. M. C. A. a more 
potent factor for good upon the 
student life — in fact we have tried 
to make our paper represent 
every phase of college life, doing 
such work as only a weekly can 
do. Whether or not any good has 
been wrought is not for us to say. 
but one thing is sure, the paper 
has been appearing from week to 
week since it was launched, con- 
trary to all predictions, and will 
continue to appear another ses- 
sion. 

We trust the fellows will not 
forget some of the policies that 
have been advocated, especially 
that of athletics, and will not 
cease from their untiring efforts. 
Let’s all see our pastors this sum- 
mer and impress upon them as it 
has never been done before our 
great need of intercollegiate ball. 
Intercollegiate games, afid it 
alone, will give that strong heart 
beat which is so necessary to-give 
life and tone to our insti- 
tution. Let us be so enthused In 
our campaign that, like the old 



THE PURPLE 



.Roman in reference to the de- 
struction of Carthage, we will end 
every speech by saying “This 
prejudice against college athletics 
must be destroyed.” 

In conclusion we wish to thank 
the faculty for the Kindness they 
have shown the members of the 
staff and the advice which they 
have given upon all important 
questions which arose. We also 
wish to thank those of the stu- 
dent body who have remained 
loyal and did everything to pro- 
mote our cause. To our friends 
we will say the staff has done the 
best it could under the prevailing 
circumstances and that we have 
no pleas to make or excuses to 
render for anything we have done. 

With the experience we have 
gained, we hope to make The 
Purple and White much stronger 
another year. Under no circum- 
stances can we afford to let it 
die, and if the student body will 
only give us their co-operation, it 
will be an assured success. 



One feature of the commence- 
ment exercises which promises to 
be of unusual interest is the 
Alumni Reunion which takes 
place Monday afternoon, June 7. 
A banquet had been planned but 
will be omitted on account of 
Bishop Galloway’s death. 

The alumni meetings have not 
been attended heretofore as they 
should be and it is encouraging 
to know that the old fellows are 
waking up to their duty. There 
should be no place, so dear to an 
alumni as his Alma Mater except 
his home. It is the duty of each 
one to return to his old college 
once a year and meet the fellows 
and talk over old times. It keeps 
a bnan from becoming old; it 
keeps him in touch with his col- 
lege and makes him more inter- 
ested in her progress. 

The graduates of a college are 
a .very potent factor in determin-- 
ing the weal or woe of their fos- 
ter mother. This force can be 
rightly used only by organization 
and unity of purpose. It is to be 
hoped that quite a number of the 
alumni will be present and that 
they will form a more perfect or- 
ganization and get something in 
view to work for. 

We trust that these old Mill- 
sapers will have a great old time 
at their reunion and will go home 
believing more firmly in their 



AND WHITE 



alma mater than ever before. 

The Alumni meeting takes place 
this time Monday afternoon. The 
banquet will be done away with 
on account of the death of Bishop 
Galloway. The old fellows are 
counting on a great old time so 
reports and invitations say. The 
following is a program of the 
meeting : 

Alumni Program. 

History Makers of the College 
—II. B. Watkins, ’99. 

People I Have Known — J. H. 
Phenix;. ’04. 

The Faculty — R. B. Ricketts, 
’98. 

Polities on the Campus — Jeff 
Collins, ’08. 

Dr. Ackland — Tom Ruff, ’08. 

Tricks of the Trade — J. T. Mc- 
Cafferty, ’02. 

A Debt We Owe — J. L. Neil, 
’06. 

Best Method of Alumni Organ- 
ization — C. A. Alexander, ’03. 



Belhaveu Commencement. 

Perhaps the most enjoyable of 
last week’s events were the re- 
citals and graduating exercises of 
Belhaven College. For four nights 
the chapel was filled with Mill- 
saps boys and others who claim 
that Belhaven is the place to see 
good looking girls and have a 
good time. 

This year’s senior class was the 
largest in the history of the in- 
stitution. There were twelve who 
received diplomas and several 
more who received certificates in 
certain branches of work. 

To the girls and to the faculty 
we want to extend our sincere 
thanks for the way in which they 
treated us during commencement 
week and also during the whole 
college year. 



Mullins and Ruff report a great 
time while in Greensboro at the 
Millsaps-Southern University de- 
bate. They claim that the Uni- 
versity boys are unequaled when 
it comes to showing a man a good 
time. Although defeated, South- 
ern University receiving two 
votes and Millsaps one, they claim 
that the good time they had was 
worth the question. 

On the night of the 7th the Pi 
Kappa Alpha fraternity will en- 
tertain the faculty and their fam- 
ilies, the senior and their aluiriii 



1 



from over the States. Their an- 
nual reception is one of the fixed 
events of commencement and is 
always looked forward to with 
great pleasure. 

A delightful menu has been ar- 
ranged, the design being carried 
out in fraternity colors. Their 
spacious halls will be thrown 
open to their guests at 8:30 an(^ 
all feel sure that they will even 
surpass their former excellence in 
entertaining. 

Prof. Ben Tindall, president of 
the M. 1. O.Ol, was on the cam- 
piis visiting friends. 

Dr. Murrah and family have 
planned for an extensive Euro- 
pean tour for the summer. 



The following paragraphs are 
taken from the Mobile Register : 

The third annual debate be- 
tween Millsaps College of Jack- 
son, Miss., and the Southern Uni- 
versity was held in the University 
chapel last night. The Southern 
University with the negative side 
of the question was awarded the 

decision. 

. • 

The question read as follows : 

Resolved, “That the Time Has 
Come When the United States 
Should Abolish Her Protective 
Tariff.” Millsaps College was 
more than creditably represented 
by Robert Mullins and Robert 
Ruff, and the Southern Univer- 
sity by J. Marvin Pennington and 
Lymann C. Brannan. The con- 
testants for the two colleges were 
radically different in their treat- 
ment of the subject. The Mill- 
saps contestants argued as to the 
injustice of the whole protective 
tariff system from an economic 
and moral standpoint, making a 
dear differentiation between a 
protective tariff and a tariff for 
revenue. Their argument was 
superb and involved a deep treat- 
ment of the subject as an eco- 
nomic one. The question seemed 
to have been decided on a mere 
technicality as to the time of the 
abolishment, which was ably con- 
tended for and brought out by 
the Southern University. 

Mr. Mullins had a very strong 
argument for Millsaps. Mr. Pen- 
nington for the Southern Univer- 
sity followed him and brought 
out the time feature. Mr. Robert 
Ruff of Millsaps came next and 
delivered one of the strongest 



PURPLE AND WHITE 



and best speeches ever delivered 
by an undergraduate student in 
the University chapel, and many 
thought he had the best speech of 
the evening. He possesses a mag- 
nificent personality and gives 
promise of a brilliant future. Mr. 
Brannan, for the Southern -Uni- 
versity. came last and debated 
splendidly. 



SOCIAL. 

Although the athletic season is 
passed for the session, neverthe- 
less the interest has not waned 
nor have the students forgotten 
the lively contests on the field. 
On the evening of May 17th. the 
young lad'es of the Freshman 
Class entertained jointly their 
football and baseball teams. The 
invitations carried out the class 
colors to perfection and upon each 
was written a very appropriate 
verse, “Defeated but not Dishon- 
ored.” 

The Galloway Society Hall was 
charmingly decorated in the class 
colors, light blue and gold. Every 
one entered into the spirit of frol- 
ic and before they knew it it was 
time fo leave. A guessing con- 
test resulted in Mrs. Ervin’s win- 
ning the prize, a large picture of 
the Freshman baseball team, 
while Mr. Cavett and Miss Graves 
together captured the booby. 

On Wednesday evening, May 
19, the Sophomore girls entertain- 
ed in honor of their athletes. It 
was their great pleasure this year 
to entertain the champion teams, 
and the large pennant bearing the 
word “Champions” proved to all 
that the girls were proud of the 
fact. The Lamar Hall was made 
gay for this occasion with pen- 
nants and decorations of blue and 
gold. One of the features of the 
entertainment was the songs ren- 
dered by the Sophomore quartet 
and finally those in which all 
joined. A set of questionse was 
given around to be answered in 
football or baseball terms. Miss 
Carrie Wharton was the fortunate 
winner of the prize. 

Refreshments were served. 

On Tuesday night, June 8th, 
the Kappa Alpha Fraternity will 
give its annual commencement re- 
ception at its handsome home on 
West street. This is always the 
crowning social event of the fra- 
ternity year and the K. A.’s in- 



tend to make the reception sur- 
pass its former standard of ex- 
cellence this year, and uphold 
their reputation as excellent en- 
tertainers. On this occasion they 
will be the hosts of the members 
of the faculty and their families, 
the Senior Class and many of 
their Alumni besides a host of 
their lady friends. With the K. 

A. reception commencement comes 
to a close. 

At a meeting of the Athletic 
Association Tuesday morning the 
following officers and managers 
were elected for next year: 

President — A. B. Campbell. 

Vice President — C. E. Johnson. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Prof. J. 

B. Walmsley. 

Baseball Manager — A. Boyd 
Campbell. 

Football Manager—' ‘ Bish ’ ’ 
Terrell. . 

Track Manager — J. B. Kirk- 
land. 

Prof. Noble athletic manager in 
the faculty. J. E. Wamslev, sec- 
retary and treasurer. 

R. D. Peets, manager of baseket 
ball. 



On May 12 a deep gloom was 
east ove rthe entire student body 
by the death of our friend and 
comrade, A. C. Anderson. The 
causes that led up to this sad and 
tragic death are too well known 
to need repeating here ; hence 
we give a sketch of his life, and 
its influence upon the boys at 
Millsaps. 

Bro. Anderson entered the pre- 
paratory department at Millsaps 
three years ago ; he was not here 
long before he had endeared him- 
self to his classmates. But this 
splendid life was too rich in those 
higher attributes, to be loved and 
admired by one class alone. Thus 
with the development of his life 
eame that broadening of influence, 
that was destined to touch the 
life of every boy on the campus. 

Bro. Anderson’s implicit confi- 
dence in God made his life beau- 
tifully considerate with the Di- 
vine Life. His high conception 
of friendship is nowhere better 
seen than in his death. Indeed, 
“Greater love hath no man than 
this, that he lay down his life for 
his friend. 

Then it is not strange that this 
life should be so admirably gift- 
ed for leadership — so wonder- 



fully endowed with influence, 
when we think of its crowning 
virtues, Faith and Friendship. - 

So optimistic was our friend 
that he saw good »n every man. 
and seeing the good sought to 
lift the man into a higher life. 
Surely no one has wrought bet- 
ter than he who has so recently 
gone from us, and he whom we 
loved so dearly. 

Bro. Anderson had given his 
life to the sacred work of the 
ministry: the call to him was 
based upon the universal needs of 
mankind, too narrow were the 
walls of a cloister for this life; 
hence the answer was “Here am 
I send me, send me.” Thus with 
the divine doctrine of the unim 
sal brotherhood of man fixed in 
his life, he declared his willing- 
ness to work under other skies 
and among other people than his 
own. 

Was his life finished? Let us 
answer in the words of onr be- 
loved friend and teacher, Prof. 
Ricketts: *“His was a finished 
life.” 



Messrs. R. J. Mullins and R. H. 
Ruff have returned from Greens- 
boro, Ala., where they joined 
Southern University in the an- 
nual debate. Messrs. Mullins an - 
Ruff handled the affirmative of 
the question: Resolved, That 

Protective Tariff Should Be Abol- 
ished, and although they were not 
victorious, we were ably repre- 
sented. This is the third annual 
debate and we have won in each 
contest prior to this one. 

We are all o. k. and satisfied 
with their work. 



LOCALS. 

We are glad that the cramming 
time for exams is over. 

Prof. Swartz is going to do M. 
A. work in the earlier part of the 
summer at the University of 
Chicago. 

Eugene Morse spent this week 
at Forest, Miss. 

Mr. V. L. Terrell is sick this 
week. 

roctor and Mrs. Murrah enter- 
tained the Senior Class at a very 
elaborate dinner Wednesday aft- 
ernoon. 




Mr. W. A. Williams, of the 
Class of ’07, spent several days 
on the campus with friends last 
week. 

Mr. D. T. Ruff, of the Class of 
’08, is in school at present. Tom 
is making up some work in order 
to secure a B. S. and M. A. de- 
gree as he graduated in the B. A. 
department of the institution last 
year. Tom is said to perform 
many miracles in Dr. Sullivan’s 
labatory. 

Prof. Jas. Blount, of Blount 
University, is spending the week 
on the campus this week. He says 
he is going to take law next year 
at the University of Chicago. 

Prof. Moore will not be a mem- 
ber of the Millsaps faculty next 
.year as he is going abroad for 
further study in the modern lan- 
guages. 

Dr. J. M. Sullivan and father 
spent several days this week at 
Oxford attending a meeting of 
the University Alumni. 

Tom Stennis says he is a great 
lover of science, especially in the 
form of chemistry, while Bob Mul- 
lin’s hobby is B. Y. P. U. chem- 
istry. 

Miss Jennie Swayze and Miss 
Mamie Cooper, of Yazoo City, are 
spending the week with Miss An- 
nie May Cooper. 

✓ 

Mr. Dunlap Peeples has the 
mumps this week. 

Messrs. H. A. Stennis and Ther- 
rell have decided to take up a 
new occupation in life. They are 
going to perform very charitable 
stunts and care for the sick. Also 
they are going to keep halls in 
perfect ouder. 

Many of the Juniors and Sen- 
iors are writing to their fathers 
this week for the price of extra 
examinations. Nuff said. 

We are glad to note that so 
many ot the o >ys me g >imr tc re- 
main for the commencement, as 
this is the true way to bring the 
college to a glorious close. 

Mr. J. L. Haley went home last 
week. 



Joe Carson and Tom Phillips 
were seen yesterday setting in 
the grand stand at League Park 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 




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MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Jackson. Miss. 

Mil Jsaps College offers courses leading 
to two degrees: B. A. <fc B. S. 

For Catalogue, address 

W. B. MURR\H, Ay. 



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Nice line of Stationery on hand 

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College Photographer. 

Jackson, 

Miss. 

Capitol St., near Bridge. 



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